SCALE - Saturn V Gallery

Discussion in 'Scale' started by Boosterdude, Feb 25, 2011.

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  1. May 23, 2012 #31

    [POW]Eagle159

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    Fixed it!
     
  2. May 23, 2012 #32

    Rocketbuilder

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  3. May 23, 2012 #33

    Verna

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  4. May 23, 2012 #34

    rocketguy101

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    This is my Centuri 1/100th model. Build thread here on YORF...

    DSC_2023_cropMR.jpg

    DSC_2014_cropMR.jpg

    DSC_2015_cropMR.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 8, 2012
  5. May 23, 2012 #35

    mperdue

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    Some shots of my 1:70 scale Saturn V.

    bld15-02.jpg

    nasa fleet-sm.jpg

    bld16-07.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 7, 2012
  6. May 23, 2012 #36

    rocketguy101

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    nice...the nasa fleet shot: all of those are 1:70 scale?
     
  7. May 23, 2012 #37

    JAL3

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    That's the Apogee version isn't it?
     
  8. May 23, 2012 #38

    [POW]Eagle159

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    I wanted some color on mine! White and black are a little simple for me.
     
  9. May 23, 2012 #39

    mperdue

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    Yes, they are. The Saturn 1B is a modified Semroc model, the Saturn V is the Apogee kit and the rest are scratch built.
     
  10. May 23, 2012 #40

    mperdue

    mperdue

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    Yes, it is. I also have the Sirius Saturn V that I like a bit better but the Apogee is the same scale as my "fleet" and my Launch Utility Tower.
     
  11. Aug 7, 2012 #41

    JAL3

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    Bump for editing
     
  12. Feb 7, 2009 #42

    JAL3

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    Apogee Saturn V (#05026) Basic Information.

    [​IMG] Apogee Components

    MODEL NAME: Saturn V Also known as:

    NUMBER: #05026

    Introduced:
    Final Year:
    Designer:

    Type: Scale
    Motor Mount: 1x29mm
    Recovery: Parachute
    Stages: 1
    Length: 62.20" (157.99 cm)
    Diameter: 5.60" (14.22 cm)
    Span:
    Weight: 17.00 oz (481.94 g)

    Mfg. Description: The Saturn V rocket may be gone — but it will never be forgotten. After all, it was the only rocket used to put men on the surface of the moon.

    The 1/70th scale Apogee Saturn V is the largest kit version in the world that doesn't require a special waiver to launch. It stands well over 62 inches tall and 5.6 inches diameter. Erect it on your desk and it will nearly touch the ceiling. People coming into the room will have no choice but to look "up." It is the similar situation when looking at the real moon rocket, which stood 363 feet in the sky. It's big, and you gotta look up at it.

    There is so much surface detail on the rocket, you can count the number of stringers (on the corrugated sections) and compare it to the real vehicle. You'll be able to immediately tell that this was a model build for scale enthusiasts like you. It will mesmerize you for hours on end as you slowly inspect every square centimeter of its surface. It will ignite your imagination as you dream about what it must have been like to have been an engineer working on it, or an astronaut to ride it into space.

    When you are finished building the model, you will have a huge sense of accomplishment and a can-do attitude to tackle other complex rockets. If you can build this one, you can build any rocket kit!

    The Apogee Saturn V is more than just space memorabilia. When you look at this new rocket, you'll be awe struck by its size, and commanding presence. Your eyes will be glued to it, like it has cast some sort of hypnotic trance on you. It demands your attention, like a Marine Drill Sergeant barking in your face.

    We mean it when we say "museum quality." These models of the Saturn V and the Saturn 1B (built by Tim Doll), are on display at the Seattle Museum of Flight. Other museums have displayed our Saturn V model too.

    Its Fun To Build! Upon seeing it, you'll relive the glory days of the space program, and the pride that swells up due to the achievement of man walking on the moon. You'll feel like you were a integral part of the launch team.

    While being a Skill Level 5 kit, this rocket will not be difficult for you to build. The instructions are detailed, and easy to follow. Instead of a printed manual with complicated text and fuzzy illustrations, these instructions are video clips that you watch.

    You just slip the instruction DVDs into your computer and turn the electronic pages with your mouse. Each page has a short movie that explains what is done in each assembly step, as well as how to perform the technique. Everyone that has watched the videos has commented that these are the best kit instructions ever made for a model rocket.

    By following the techniques in the video instructions, your completed model will be a flawless work of art. People will marvel at the way you have the tube so smooth, and the paint applied with such crisp edges.

    And besides building a museum-quality display model, your rocket can be launched in the sky! Yes, it was really designed to be blasted off into space. (Apogee 2012 Web Ad)


    Advertising Liveries

    [​IMG] 2012 Web Ad


    Face Card(s)



    Instruction Header(s)





    First post in this thread featuring this rocket.

    See Also: LINKS
    EMRR
    RocketReviews
    Mfg. Page


    If you have any additional information on this rocket and/or catalog photos please let us know.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012
  13. Feb 7, 2009 #43

    JAL3

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    Centuri Saturn 5 (KS-12 or #5142) Basic Information.

    [​IMG] Centuri Engineering

    MODEL NAME: Saturn 5 Also known as: Saturn V

    NUMBER: KS-12 or #5142

    Introduced: 1969
    Final Year: 1983
    Designer: Keith Niskern

    Type: Scale, Cluster
    Motor Mount: 3x18mm
    Recovery: Parachute
    Stages: 1
    Length: 43.6"
    Diameter: 3.96"
    Span:
    Weight: 9.9 oz

    Mfg. Description: This real flying model of the world's most powerful space rocket is an excellent project for any modeller. Standing over 43" tall, the Saturn 5 is a real beauty both on display and in flight. Powered by a cluster of 3 engines, it climbs hundreds of feet up to "apogee", then separates into two parts and ejects 3 parachutes. The APOLLO space craft descends gently on its own 24" parachute while the main body returns safely with two big 24" chutes. Launch your SATURN 5 many times. Kit includes complete assembly and operating instructions plus tech report on clustering techniques. (Centuri 1969 Catalog)

    =====

    An intricately designed and detailed version of the famous Moon-shot workhorse, this flying model of the world's most powerful rocket is a challenge to the most qualified rocketeer. Standing almost 4 feet tall on its removable display engine nozzles, this breath-taking Saturn V draws admiring crowds from every corner of the launch site. Powered by a cluster of three engines, it climbs hundreds of feet to "apogee", separates into two parts, and ejects three parachutes. The Apollo spacecraft returns gently on its own 24: parachute while the main body descends gently on two big 24" chutes. Launch your Saturn V many times over. It is designed to take it. Kit includes complete assembly and operating instructions. Bonus features include a Technical Information Report on cluster ignition (TIR-52) and a historical Saturn data booklet. (Centuri 1970 Christmas Catalog)

    =====

    Scaled from official NASA blueprints, this kit is an exact scale replica of the rocket that landed men on the moon. Not a "shake together" kit, the SATURN V is intended for rocketeers who have built a few beginner type kits. Due to the excellently engineered and precisely fabricated components, the SATURN V is certainly not beyond the scope of the average rocketeer who wishes to experience the pride that comes from creating his own "model rocket masterpiece". Construction is thoroughly explained in a well illustrated 12 page construction booklet. The kit features "full depth" corrugated wrappers with intricate external details molded right in. Vacu-form tail fairings and hollow core fins simplify construction and provide greater flight strength. Fully detailed engine nozzles lend a "complete look" for display purposes. Molded plastic APOLLO capsule and full color authentic decals complete the kit.

    Performing as beautifully as it looks, the SATURN V lifts slowly and realistically from the launch pad. Rising rapidly under power and coasting to apogee, the SATURN deploys its colorful parachutes. The spacecraft descends slowly on its own 20" chute while the main body swings lazily earthward on a pair of large 24" chutes. A Tech Report on "Clustering Techniques" is included as background info for launching this 3 engine show stopper. (Centuri 1971 Catalog)


    Advertising Liveries

    [​IMG] 1969 Catalog [​IMG] 1970 Christmas [​IMG] 1971 Catalog


    Face Card(s)

    [​IMG]

    Instruction Header(s)

    [​IMG] [​IMG]


    First post in this thread featuring this rocket.

    See Also: LINKS
    EMRR
    RocketReviews
    Mfg. Page


    If you have any additional information on this rocket and/or catalog photos please let us know.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2013
  14. Oct 14, 2012 #44

    Orion

    Orion

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    FLARE, my local rocket club, hosted the 40th anniversary commemoration ceremonies of the Apollo 17th lunar mission. In attendance were Harrison Schmitt and Jan Evans, widow of astronaut Ronald Evans. Since the Apollo 17th mission was launched at night, we did a re-enactment with a night launch using my Estes Saturn V #2157 which I had modified by putting 21 led lights on it. We had various other activities that involved rocketry such as launching scale models of space rockets that led up to the Apollo missions. Below are two photos of my Saturn V, one at the test flight prior to the ceremonies (incomplete paint job) and one at the event. The launch pad was built by fellow FLARE member Dave Kovar. The Saturn V was launched with an E18-4 engine.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  15. Oct 14, 2012 #45

    Orion

    Orion

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    Here is a shot of my Saturn V taken by my son.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Oct 21, 2012 #46

    mbauer

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    One of my favorite rockets. I've built two of the Estes. One from the 1985 to launch with my kids and another in 1986 when the first suffered a CATO. Two years ago I sold the newest one to aparent that was launching rockets with his kids for $20.

    Now I design them using cardstock and compressed air to launch them. here are some photos of the Stomp Rocket (27" tall), a newer compressed air at 6ft tall and finally the newest design at 1/32 scale (10.4ft tall). The photo with the just completed six model also shows the 27" along with the Estes I still have.
    27" tall
    Saturn V-1.JPG
    6ft tall
    airtank.jpg
    Sat V Ready to Go.JPG

    1/32 scale redraw
    Saturn V Done-6.jpg


    I plan to repair the estes one of these days. Besides the cato, on the 4th flight it went balistic into the ground and destroyed the upper portions. It was rebuilt, but not using the correct paper. The escape tower was completely destroyed and was not fixable.

    6ft tall, Estes, 27" tall Saturns
    Done.JPG

    Mike
     
  17. Jul 22, 2013 #47

    jcato

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    {Note to the reader: The original of this post was posted in July 2013 - during the 44th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon. Moderately significant updates to the story occurred on July 16, 2014 - the 45th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch. These updates are noted with the "{7-16-2014 update:.... }" immediately preceding the updated text. Due to the 10 photo limit to TRF posts, a secondary post was added in 2014 to contain the additional photos - in post #52 a few posts below this one - and links are provided here to point to that 'addendum' post. -- jhc.}

    In the spirit of those intrepid explorers who, 44 years ago this hour were on their way home from mankind's first steps on another world - and in the spirit of remembrance of Neil Armstrong who, for the first time is no longer with us, I figured it would be an appropriate time to share some other remembrances of that special time in human history. Attached are some photos from the 20th and 30th Anniversary Commemorations of the Apollo 11 launch - from Kennedy Space Center conducted by myself and my friend, Earl Cagle. I can't put my hands on any from the 25th (that we also attended) - but may be able to track some of those down at a later time.

    The vehicle for the first commemoration was a vintage Centuri 1:100 scale Saturn V kit - lovingly constructed (over about a full year) by Earl Cagle. This vehicle was modified to a 5 engine cluster (based on prior development on my Centuri Saturn V) - having a main 24mm composite (AeroTech E10 or E15) with 4 outboard Estes mini-A3 in the scale locations - ignited by flashbulb thru a microswitch in the launcher that sensed first motion (from the E15) and fired as the rocket lifted off (the mini A's came 'online' about half-way up the tower). The tower was a 'semi-scale' effort by myself - built back in the spring of 1970 (with the best available info I had at the time) and the pad was a true-scale effort - built in the spring and summer of 1989 immediately before the Commemoration - the data of which was the result of extensive research over the preceding year of the LC39 facilities. The whole effect was enhanced by a 'Flame Trench Device' (FTD) - a pyrotechnic flame/smoke generator initiated at T -9 seconds - simulating the thrust build-up of the real Saturn. There were several versions of the the FTD, including custom formulations - but the device used in the commemorations were specially manufactured G-25 dual-ended motors prepared for us by AeroTech.

    The 20th Anniversary Commemoration (our 'Mission AS-506-20') was conducted from the Press Site at Launch Complex 39 on 16 July 1989 as part of a broader celebration that day (an open house for the NASA employees and friends). Our setup and launch was immediately in front of (and coordinated with) the countdown clock that actually counted down the real Apollo 11 launch. The launch audio of the final minutes of the Apollo 11 launch commentated by Jack King - the 'Voice of Apollo Launch Control' was played and synchronized with the countdown clock. This was attended by about 500 of the NASA family - sitting in the bleachers - and, upon liftoff, they cheered as though it was a real Apollo mission lifting off. A real special day.

    Preceding those (B&W) photos from the actual commemoration are some 'setup photos' done for NASA prior to the actual event (in late June of 1989) - taken here locally (south GA) at what we called 'Flight Readiness Firing #2' (FRF-2) as the second test flight of all the hardware.

    506-20_FRF-2-006_1564x1024_q80.jpg 506-20_FRF-2-011_1024x1638_q80.jpg 506-20_FRF-2-013_1024x1635_q80.jpg 506-20_FRF-2-015_1024x1609_q80.jpg
    506-20_T-11-22_1024x687_q80.jpg 506-20_T+20-05_1024x687_q80.jpg 506-20_jhc-after_w-kids_1024x689_q80.jpg


    {7-16-2014 update:
    One thing I failed to mention in the original writeup was that our vehicle had a payload to signify the special nature of this mission. There were several items in this 'kit' that was carried onboard (inside the S-IVB stage): 1) We drafted up a special commemorative document that I had printed on archival paper - 10 copies of which was onboard; 2) A full (32 stamps), unbroken mint sheet of the Apollo 11 Commemorative stamp issued by the USPS (Sept. 1969); 3) Two Apollo 11 mission patches; & 4) A photo of Earl's long-time family pet (a Bassett hound) that had recently passed away. It was our intention to have the Apollo 11 crew sign the (flight) documents, but that was not to be. After the mission, we broke up the mint sheet of stamps, mounted one on each of the 10 Commemorative documents and disbursed them to various individuals who played a role in making this whole event possible - including the Apollo 11 crew (not that they helped necessarily - but it was obvious that they should receive a copy). In the addendum post below is a copy of the document (with stamp) and an interpretation document that was attached to the back of each (framed) document - explaining the design and significance of each item in the document - along with a distribution list of where each of the 10 copies went. (Earl's father (professional photographer) helped us out with the matting and framing). We got a response from Neil Armstrong's Administrative Assistant thanking us for it and Earl received a personal, handwritten 'Thank You' from Michael Collins.}

    These documents are below in post:

    http://www.rocketryforum.com/showthread.php?19611-SCALE-Saturn-V-Gallery&p=732582#post732582


    We returned to KSC in 1994 for the 25th Anniversary (Mission AS-506-25) and conducted this launch at the Visitor's Center immediately north of the Rocket Garden (with a few additional flights from the crew over in Tampa) - this time with an Estes Saturn V (the previous vehicle was retired after 506-20) built by myself. Same general setup - and launched, again, in synchronization with the actual audio of the Apollo 11 countdown. NASA had moved the ceremonies here to the Visitor's Center and our launch was introduced by Jack King and we got a "Well done!" by Rocco Petrone after the launch was over. In the true spirit of Apollo, we had a 'splashdown' in the reflecting pond to our north (Earl retrieved the vehicle with 'Hornet II' - an inflatable raft - braving the alligators in the pond (really!)). No photos of that event are immediately available here - but we've got them packed away here somewhere. Was able to meet several others from the program at that time - including a photo op with Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise and I talked Bob Sieck (prime Shuttle Launch Director) to accepting the position (downgrade <g>) and autographing my program as the 'Assistant Launch Director - Mission 506-25'.


    {7-16-2014 update:
    One thing I always (+-) had with me with these 'missions' at KSC was my (original) copy (the book) of the Time-Life "To The Moon" commemorative book/record set (I'm sure many of you remember this set - released in the fall of 1969) - in case an autograph opportunity presented itself - which happened on several occasions, particularly in 1994. While I'm still looking for the photos (of the 25th - I think Earl has most of them), I did scan some of the pages of these autographs. After the flight of 506-25, many of the dignitaries at the event gathered in the Press Center there at the Visitor's Center (not within public access) and I was able to garner quite a few here. The large portion of these occur on the title page of "To The Moon". Besides the obvious ones of Petrone, King and Crippen, some of the others may need explanation (going CCW from upper left): Donald Buchanan (ML - middle left - above Petrone's) was the 'main man' who oversaw the build-up of LC39 and his signature appears (as the final approval authority) on practically every engineering document of that era. A year or two after this event, Earl and I spent an entire afternoon at his home there in Titusville talking with him (on video) about those days during the 'heyday' of Apollo; Walt Kapryan (LL) was the Deputy Launch Director of Apollo 11; Ed Harrison (BL) was our main Public Affairs liason in the planning on this - and was reluctant to sign here - until I insisted; Paul C. Donnelly was Launch Operations Manager for Apollo 11; and Hugh Harris was Director of Public Affairs (at that time (1994) - not during Apollo 11).

    The day before this (July 15) was the dedication of the Center for Space Education there at the Visitor's Center (over on the west side adjacent to the Rocket Garden). It was here that Earl and I encountered Bob Sieck and where I 'coerced' :) him into autographing (on the CSE program) as 'Asst Launch Director' for the (upcoming - the next day) 506-25 mission (which he didn't quite understand the significance of the numbering, but graciously "took the assignment" and autographed accordingly :) ). This is also where we had a moment or two with Fred Haise (and each got our photo op) along with an autograph or two.

    During all this, Homer Hickam ("The Rocket Boys" and "October Sky") was there at the Visitor's Center and I took a moment to thank him for the example he set for all the young 'future engineers' coming up - which (I think) is why he made my autograph a little more special - which was on page 8 - the intro to the 'Prologue' section of "To The Moon".}

    The scans of these documents appear below in post:

    http://www.rocketryforum.com/showthread.php?19611-SCALE-Saturn-V-Gallery&p=732582#post732582


    {7-16-2014 update:
    Since we had a pretty good record with NASA, plans again came together for us to make yet another trip for the 30th Anniversary in 1999 (Mission AS-506-30). In the lead up to 506-30, the local paper got wind of all this (well, they already were following this in prior years) and a friend who works there gave us a nice 'send-off' article about 2 weeks before 506-30 (he was actually able to have the paper send him to KSC along with us - got his Press Pass and all - and says the Press Conference with the Apollo 11 crew was, "the high point of my career - I was *this close* (motioning about 8-10 feet) to Neil Armstrong!!!" His son (teenager) also helped us with the launch. I include a scan of this - which also gives a little more history - but, mainly, it has a lift-off shot of the vehicle (this a test flight a few weeks before 506-30). With Earl and I all involved with actually getting the FTD ignited in synchronicity with the countdown audio (my job) and then getting the vehicle in the air (Earl's job), "Lift Off" shots are (were) few and far between - so, at least here, folks can get an idea of what the experience is like (I understand, today, we'd just set up a smart phone and video the whole sequence digitally for upload - but one must remember the time - 15 to 25 years ago - and the technology available (at least to us) then). The photo quality isn't all that good - but one can get a feel for 'the liftoff experience' - with the FTD (Flame Trench Device) plus a cup or two (maybe 1/2 pound) of carpenter's chalk and fire extinguisher powder that was 'dumped' into the flame trench when the main motor ignited - to be blown out and enhance the smoke effect.}

    506-30-ccn_main_1300.jpg


    Two weeks later, we loaded up 'the facilities' in a U-Haul and headed south once again - with another Estes vehicle - built by Earl and myself - and were part of the (static) setup for the groundbreaking (which occurred exactly at 9:32am) of the Apollo Memorial on the banks of the Indian River in Titusville on the actual anniversary (16 July 1999). This was attended by Astronauts Wally Schirra and Gene Cernan (who made some references to our setup in their words to the guests there) among others - and the vehicle flew the next day (17 July), again at the Visitor's Center (not even 10 feet from where the launch occurred in 1994) - but this was not part of any real formal ceremonies (mainly, because NASA didn't have any - it was just a scheduled event there at the Visitor's Center for the public to attend). NASA, instead, had a banquet at the Saturn V Center that evening - to which we were invited and were able to meet and speak a few words with some of the 'famous ones' (Earl with Neil Armstrong, myself with Buzz Aldrin and Charlie Duke) along with both of us speaking a moment or two with Andrew Chaikin ("A Man on the Moon" - which led to the HBO/Tom Hanks mini-series "From the Earth to the Moon") as well as a few others from the Apollo program. Attached are some photos from the Apollo Memorial groundbreaking ceremony -- one with us with Jack King and another with George Mueller. (See some additional scans/documents in the 'addendum' post below). Some special days (but still pales in comparison to those days in 1969) and carries many special memories.

    apollo-506-30-cagle-king-cato_1024.jpg apollo-506-30_Apollo park w-George Mueller.jpg


    Obviously, this post can't end without extending a heartfelt "Thank You" to all those that made this possible - extending even to those of our family who helped with local logistics - to the folks at Estes Industries (Mary Roberts and Bob Cannon in particular) for more than one of their famous Saturn V kits (as well as some writeups in MRN) -- and Gary Rosenfield at AeroTech for those 'special motors' that made this launch experience all the more realistic - but, for sure, the individuals at NASA that opened doors, worked the issues and 'stepped out in faith' to allow us to be a part of their celebration of Mankind's Greatest Adventure (as this surely was). Particularly, a 'Thank You' MUST go to Mary Jo Tippett and Ed Harrison (of NASA Public Affairs) who went above and beyond in every sense of the word. These were memories for a lifetime and all the above individuals are fundamental to helping make those memories a reality.

    -- john.


    edits:
    early 2014: Corrected the 30th Anniv events/dates at the Apollo Memorial ceremony - it was the *groundbreaking*, not the 'dedication'

    7-16-2014: Added additional text re: the 20th Anniv Commemorative items and further expansion to the 25th and 30th commemorations.

    7-21-2014: Some additional edits, spelling corrections and 'smoothing' of the flow of the writing.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2014
  18. Jul 22, 2013 #48

    luke strawwalker

    luke strawwalker

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    EXTREMELY cool stuff! Congrats! OL JR :)
     
  19. Jul 24, 2013 #49

    estowe

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    Here are my little scale models in commemoration of Apollo.
    saturns_house_1.jpg saturns_office_1.jpg

    My local rocket club SoAR is having a lunch in Commerce, GA on Aug 17,18 and I'm launching both of them.

    Everett
     
  20. Jul 24, 2013 #50

    qquake2k

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    Holy MOLY that's a big Saturn V! They're both gorgeous, too! I hope you'll post flight photos and videos.
     
  21. Jul 24, 2013 #51

    vcp

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    SaturnV.jpg

    FWIW the 3D printable SaturnV on Thingiverse: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:45316 works out surprisingly well. The smaller one in the pic is the original size of the .stl files, at about 12" tall. The larger one is an 180% upscale of that, which was the largest my printer could do without slicing up the model further. These are shown without any touch-up at all, and I'd say they are certainly worthy of taking some time to paint. Haven't given it much thought, but I'd think either would be capable of a flight conversion as well.

    Gary
     
  22. Jul 16, 2014 #52

    jcato

    jcato

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    Some Apollo Commemorations - Addendum - 16 July 2014:

    The original text is in post #47 (immediately above - edited 7-16-2014)...

    http://www.rocketryforum.com/showthread.php?19611-SCALE-Saturn-V-Gallery&p=568068#post568068

    ... and the new (7-16-14) referenced photos/scans/documents are here:

    The Commemorative document flown on AS506-20 (1989):

    506-20-doc+prov.jpg 506-20-doc interp.jpg


    Some of the 'souvenirs' from AS506-25 (1994):

    506-25-autographs_petrone_king_etc.jpg 506-25-autographs_AMF_sieck_haise_crippen.jpg 506-25-autographs_hickam.jpg


    ... and the items from AS506-30 (1999):

    The first of Jack King and George Mueller (+ a few others) at the Groundbreaking for the Apollo Exhibit (see pictures in the original post - at the end). As to the banquet the following day, I took my "To The Moon" autograph book to the Commemoration Dinner, but the situation didn't really 'fit' with bothering all these people with their autographs - however Charlie Duke graciously complied (This page is the frontispiece (page 122) to the Apollo section of "To The Moon" ). I also provide a scan of the program for the Commemoration Dinner to give an idea of the extensive dignitaries in attendance. I just about trimmed out the menu - but I suppose there's some merit in seeing how nice a banquet NASA put together, so I left that in...

    506-30-autographs-king_mueller.jpg 506-30-autographs_duke.jpg 506-30-banquet_1024v.jpg

    -- john.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2014
  23. Aug 22, 2014 #53

    jcato

    jcato

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    I've created some Google Earth placemarks for the locations of AS506-20, 506-25, and 506-30 here:

    20th Anniversary - 1989:
    View attachment AS506-20 Launch.kml
    View attachment AS506-20 Landing.kml

    This is a Ground Level View that mimics the view up the Crawlerway ramp (our model, not the real one) with the VAB in the background (see the original post (#47) - the second B&W photo):
    View attachment AS506-20 Ground Level view.kml

    (Even the open doors in the VAB is the same (wow!)) :)


    25th Anniversary - 1994:
    View attachment AS506-25 Launch.kml
    View attachment AS506-25 'Splashdown'.kml


    30th Anniversary - 1999:
    Apollo Memorial (location of groundbreaking):
    View attachment AS506-30 Apollo Memorial - US Spacewalk.kml

    View attachment AS506-30 Launch.kml
    View attachment AS506-30 Landing.kml

    (You can just left-click on the '.kml' link and select 'Open With' and it should open in Google Earth without needing to browse for the application - the placemark will be placed in your 'Temporary Places' folder (that you would need to move to more permanent location prior to closing Google Earth.) Alternately, you can save the placemark on your hard drive and open from there.)

    -- john.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2014
  24. Aug 23, 2014 #54

    Micromeister

    Micromeister

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    Heres my Estes Saturn-V and Pad 39 gantry complex.

    Saturn-V flt 041-c-sm color liftoff_04-23-72.jpg

    Saturn-V flt 139c-sm_Goddard SFC 2pic_07-18-99.jpg
     
  25. Aug 23, 2014 #55

    jcato

    jcato

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    John, from the dates (5-18-70), it appears we were building our LUT's at exactly the same time (I was taking a few classes at the local Jr. College in the spring of 1970 and working on my LUT at that time). Interesting parallel. What prompted your project? (When I saw that tower on the back of the Centuri catalog, it was a 'done deal' - I *had* to have a LUT, no exceptions <g>).

    I'm curious how many LUTs there are out there - have you ever heard?

    -- john.
     
  26. Aug 23, 2014 #56

    Micromeister

    Micromeister

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  27. Aug 24, 2014 #57

    jcato

    jcato

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    Yeah, I know -- I'm a Moderator over there <g>

    (and for those who are not aware and would like to look things over (there's a really decent archive of stuff from LC39), go check it out:

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/LUT_Group/info )

    Well, as least ONE does (i.e. me <g>).

    One of our members ('Cyana') is a radiologist in Austria and long ago passed 'fanatic' status in this -- and has done an incredible *PAPER* model of the Crawler (presently available) -- see:

    http://www.microartwork.com/html/crawler_transporter_1-96_model.html

    ... and is now working on the LUT - here:

    http://www.microartwork.com/html/lut_1-96_model.html

    Once this is finished, he will then do the Saturn V -- but this is some really beautiful work.


    I'm truly saddened to hear that (again... as I think I remember you telling that story previously (can't remember where - but I do remember it)). Mine has survived - including a trip over to Auburn during college as well as a few other disasters - but it's still here. While only semi-scale (the hammerhead crane is pretty close to true-scale - but it was built in the early summer of 1989, right before AS506-20), but I would be heart broken to lose any part of it.

    I (strongly) encourage you to start that planning for another one. I know trying to 'pick up the pieces' and strengthen yourself emotionally to 'start over' is many times hard - but once you get started, all the thrill of building it will return. As I always say, "You build it the first time to see how to build it the second time." Just think of all the improvements you can incorporate into "The Next Build"!

    I not able to find your name in the membership over at the LUT_group - but if you're not a member, please do sign up and browse around over there -- it will inspire you. I would have been 'weak-kneed' if this resource had existed back in 1970 when I was building my original LUT. Now that we've got some expanded file space (up to 2Gb from 100Mb), I'm fixing to start uploading some more 'interesting' drawings that I couldn't previously due to no storage space. IOW, "It's a good time to build a LUT".

    It has been my plan (after 506-25 in 1994) to build a pad complex in 1:48 scale (just think of the pad at 40 feet long !!! <g>) But I'm still plugging away at trying to do that (just found some surplus floppy drive motors - cheap - 10 for 2.99 (i.e. 30c each) - that will just fit (i.e. be completely hidden) in the tower swing arm hinges, so, if I can work out 5v-3phase power for them (what they are), I'll be able to (almost) drive the swing arms the way NASA did (NASA used hydraulics, I'll use electricity - but the location of the 'motive force' will occur in the scale location)).

    "Small moves, Elle. Small moves." (Eleanor Araway's (Jody Foster) father in the movie "Contact")

    That's what it's all about.

    Get over there to the LUT_group.... really.

    -- john.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2014
  28. Apr 28, 2017 #58

    Steven

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    One of these days I may dust off my Centuri version and do a build on it.
     
  29. Aug 1, 2019 #59

    Jay Chladek

    Jay Chladek

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    Estes #1969 Saturn V, issued early 2019. This model took every trick learned on the previous Saturn V kits from Estes and Centuri and improved them. The wraps, capsule, display engines, fins and the capsule are all new molds. A new blow molded SLA cone has also been added to the mix meaning no more need to roll a paper transition section and trying to get it look good.

    The model pictured below was built over a nearly 6 month period and represents SA-506 (Apollo 11). I added detailing to the BPC (command module) and the Service Module to get a more accurate look than Estes recommendations. Decals were a combination of Estes and Space Model Systems markings designed for the Revell 1/96 Saturn V kit.

    She flew once on July 16, 2019 on an Estes composite E30-4T. Estimated flight altitude was about 300 feet and except for the escape tower popping off (easily re-glued) there was no damage to the rocket on landing. She is now retired to my display shelf.

    Estes kits.jpg esvpad1.jpg esvpad2.jpg esvpad3.jpg
     

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