=scale= data needed - Freeflight Atmospheric Scramjet Test Technique (FASTT)

brianc

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Recently this item caught my eye-
https://www.atk.com/newsreleases2005/2005-12-15-test.asp
Alliant Techsystems (NYSE: ATK), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR) successfully ground-launched and flew a hypersonic scramjet-powered vehicle from the Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va. in a pre-dawn launch on Saturday, Dec. 10. This was the first-ever free flight of a scramjet-powered vehicle using conventional liquid hydrocarbon jet fuel. The launch and flight test were part of the Freeflight Atmospheric Scramjet Test Technique (FASTT) program sponsored by DARPA and ONR.
A December 2005 Wallops newsletter indicates the FASTT was launched by a Terrier-Orion.

However, the only =scale= data info I can find on this vehicle, is it's (approx.) 106" long x 11" diameter.

Anybody got some insider info or pics?

EDIT: Hmmm. Could the HyFly program be it (or related)? Pic on this page-
https://www.atk.com/AdvancedWeaponSystems/advanceweaponsystems_hyfly.asp

Using an innovative flight-test technique, ATK is providing key program risk reduction by carrying out a series of flight experiments employing low-cost, two-stage sounding rockets to transport airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered missile demonstrators to appropriate hypersonic speeds and altitudes.

Initial flight tests of an un-powered airframe at Mach 6 and approximately 60,000 feet have been highly successful. The next series of tests will use a fully operational scramjet engine integrated to the airframe.

Looks like FASTT is part of the HyFly program- https://www.darpa.mil/body/news/2005/hyfly_test.pdf

So.... Does anyone know what the inlet shroud looks like?
 

bobkrech

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This is it for public consumption. From https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/munitions/hyfly.htm

hyfly-image1.jpg


hyfly-image2.jpg
 

brianc

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Originally posted by bobkrech
This is it for public consumption. From https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/munitions/hyfly.htm
Thanks. Already had those.

The DARPA press release says "Following separation from the booster, the vehicle jetisoned
the inlet shroud and the scramjet ignited..."

That suggests the nose doesn't look like those pictures for boost configuration. I'm curious
to find out what the shroud looks like and how it separates (splits into two or more pieces?)
from the vehicle.
 

bobkrech

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I wouldn't be surprised if the entire vehicle is shrouded to aid in cover separation.

The 2005 Sounding Rocket Handbook describes the payload sections for the Improved Orion as:

"The standard payload for the Improved Orion has a principal diameter of 14 inches and utilizes many nose cone shapes. The normal payload length varies from 72 to 100 inches although this is not the maximum envelope. Payload diameters as small as 4.5 inches are flown on the Orion and performance characteristics are most favorable for 85 to 150 pound payloads.

Standard hardware includes a separable clamshell nose cone and an Orion standard ignition system. Separation systems can be provided to separate the payload from the motor during ascent."

and for the Improved Terrier Orion as:

"Payload configurations supported by this vehicle include 14 inch and bulbous 17.25 inch diameters. Payload weights ranging from 200 to 800 pounds can achieve altitudes of approximately 200 to 80 kilometers respectively.

Available support systems include the standard 14 inch Ignition Recovery Module Assembly (IRMA), ACS systems, and nose cones of various configurations. The complete cadre of 17.25 inch diameter support systems is available for use with the bulbous payloads. These include fixed and deployable nose cones; fine, course, rate control, and magnetic ACS systems; separation and despin systems; and forward and aft recovery systems."

If I had to guess, I'd assume a clamshell payload section covering the entire missile.
 
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