3D Printing Rule requirement for fiber reinforcement for M+ motors and 3D printed fincans

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

Dustin Lobner

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Sep 3, 2019
Messages
176
Reaction score
74
Hi everyone,

I know there's a rule in place saying that any M or larger rocket with a 3D printed fincan needs to have fiber reinforcement...or something like that? I just went through the safety/rules section on the Tripoli website and can't find anything about it in terms of specifics.

Does this mean that the material itself needs to be reinforced (with carbon fiber or fiberglass or whatever), or can you print something and then laminate it with carbon fiber or fiberglass lay up?

Thanks!

Dustin
 

rharshberger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2014
Messages
9,266
Reaction score
1,367
Location
Pasco, WA
Hi everyone,

I know there's a rule in place saying that any M or larger rocket with a 3D printed fincan needs to have fiber reinforcement...or something like that? I just went through the safety/rules section on the Tripoli website and can't find anything about it in terms of specifics.

Does this mean that the material itself needs to be reinforced (with carbon fiber or fiberglass or whatever), or can you print something and then laminate it with carbon fiber or fiberglass lay up?

Thanks!

Dustin
Currently afaik the only restriction is that a 3D printed fincan may not be used for L3 cert. Unless maybe you are refering to tip to tip and or laminating.
 

Dustin Lobner

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Sep 3, 2019
Messages
176
Reaction score
74

Dustin Lobner

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Sep 3, 2019
Messages
176
Reaction score
74
I think that was your subconscious telling you not to launch a 3d printed rocket without proper reinforcement. I would listen to that little voice :)
Hahahah, yeah. My main issue is I have this filament that I really like (Matterhacker's Tough PLA). Amazing layer to layer adhesion, and it bends before it breaks. I've tried various "filled" filaments (fiberglass, carbon, etc) and they're always strong one way but that z-axis weakness rears its ugly head in the form of bad layer to layer adhesion. I *think* I can do better with a thick-walled Tough PLA print. Nice part is, for part of my job, I run a mechanical test lab, so I can find out for sure. But I'm not sure that filled plastic is the best thing for that either. TBD.
 

alexzogh

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2010
Messages
651
Reaction score
115
I'd love to see your test results if you are willing to share.
 
Top