Rocket Video Q's

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ssthor

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I am looking to build my first rocket with a video camera and have a few preliminary questions before I start. I have an Aerotech ARCAS and a X10 camera.

1. Does it matter, in regards to stability, where the camera and shroud is located? That is, I would like to utilize the payload bay and do not know if the camera's location will effect the stability.

2. The camera itself will be pointed down the body tube. What techniques have been used to mount the camera?

3. What materials and techniques have been used to mount the shroud?

4. What techniques and materials have been used to house the electronics inside? I was thinking of using velcro (very light weight).

Any information will be highly appreciated.

Thanks,

:cool:
 

hokkyokusei

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Originally posted by ssthor
I am looking to build my first rocket with a video camera and have a few preliminary questions before I start. I have an Aerotech ARCAS and a X10 camera.

1. Does it matter, in regards to stability, where the camera and shroud is located? That is, I would like to utilize the payload bay and do not know if the camera's location will effect the stability.

2. The camera itself will be pointed down the body tube. What techniques have been used to mount the camera?

3. What materials and techniques have been used to mount the shroud?

4. What techniques and materials have been used to house the electronics inside? I was thinking of using velcro (very light weight).

1. It does matter where you add any weight of course, but I would expect that adding weight to the payload bay of the HV Arcas will increase stability. Beware though, that if you add too much weight, it may lead to overstability.

2. I'm not sure how big/heavy the X10 camera is, but sandwiching it between a pair of lightweight centring rings might work.

3. I've used paper, with a light wrap of fibreglass. I've seen others use carved balsa, half a plastic nose cone, a section cut from a phenolic tube - lots of methods of doing this.

4. I bult my camera into a lightweight frame (with centring rings), and then packed it into the payload bay with disks of expanded polystyrene. The nose cone was secured using plastic rivets.
 
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