Roadrunner Rocketry

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

TNmike

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 13, 2017
Messages
50
Reaction score
0
Are they still manufacturing motors? Nothing on their website indicates they are defunct. Yet ThrustCurve says they are not in production, and I haven't seen anything to confirm they are still in business. So, what is it? Inquiring minds want to know.
 

TNmike

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 13, 2017
Messages
50
Reaction score
0
Bummer. I wished there were 2 or 3 more who made single use motors.
 

mikec

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 9, 2009
Messages
2,554
Reaction score
405
Yes, these looked like good motors, and they were even certified for use in California. I'd be curious to know what the story with RR was -- they used molded cases like Aerotech's.
 

manixFan

Not a rocket scientist
Joined
Feb 15, 2009
Messages
2,230
Reaction score
1,320
Location
TX
They were great motors, I flew dozens of them without a single issue. I still have one or two left to fly but haven't flown anything small for a while. At one launch I flew 7 RR motors which was probably the most fun I've ever had at a launch.

RR also caused AT to up their game. After RR came on the market, Gary moved to molded cases and regular two-wire ignitors for his F & G motors. So anyone who buys a SU F or G motor today is still benefitting from RR motors. (Darkstar motors had those as well but were long out of production.)

RoadRunner is also now out of production unfortunately.


Tony
 

RoyAtl

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
1,422
Reaction score
50
Location
Atlanta Metro
Four years ago, I inquired about becoming a vendor for RoadRunner at our launches, and the owner wrote back saying he no longer had time for the business, and did not see that changing in the future. Now four years later, and that doesn't seem to have changed.

And yes, the five motors I purchased and used were very good.
 

samb

Lifetime Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
4,094
Reaction score
502
Location
Plano, TX
Shread is a punk rocker ?!? Who knew. :wink:

A Roadrunner F45 was my first AP motor back in 2007. You never forget your first one. :)
 

jsdemar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Messages
2,763
Reaction score
788
Roadrunner motors were manufactured by Ellis Mountain. After Robert Ellis' untimely passing, there weren't many other options for the owner. It was a significant investment for a small market when they decided to mold the casings. Other custom jigs were made to help reduce the labor cost. I had the pleasure of visiting Bob several times when I used to live 30 minutes from him. A great loss to the hobby when he died.
 

cwbullet

Obsessed with Rocketry
Staff member
Administrator
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Global Mod
Joined
Jan 24, 2009
Messages
28,048
Reaction score
5,588
Location
Glennville, GA
I think Roadrunner and Ellis are two fo the single motors I really miss.
 

cwbullet

Obsessed with Rocketry
Staff member
Administrator
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Global Mod
Joined
Jan 24, 2009
Messages
28,048
Reaction score
5,588
Location
Glennville, GA
i really wish some one had the formulas.
 

jsdemar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Messages
2,763
Reaction score
788
The formulas were simple low-solids, good for pourable processing. The other thing that made them long-burn was the grain geometry Ellis used.
 

Bdpeters

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2017
Messages
51
Reaction score
10
Location
utah
they are great motors, got a couple left. looks like they are still certified but it looks like the G80 is expiring dec 30th.
 

dvdsnyd

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 9, 2012
Messages
292
Reaction score
100
John, Do you have any more information on the grain geometry? I assume it differed quite a bit from simple bates grains?

The formulas were simple low-solids, good for pourable processing. The other thing that made them long-burn was the grain geometry Ellis used.
 

jsdemar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Messages
2,763
Reaction score
788
John, Do you have any more information on the grain geometry? I assume it differed quite a bit from simple bates grains?
They were C-slots, mostly. I think some larger long-burn motors were offset long cores.
 
Top