Quantcast

Removing paint dams?

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

Rktman

Eric
TRF Supporter
Joined
Mar 5, 2017
Messages
1,241
Reaction score
181
What's the best technique for removing paint dams where two colors meet?
 

Nathan

TRF Supporter
Joined
Apr 20, 2012
Messages
2,130
Reaction score
437
Lightly sanding with 1000 grit then 2000 grit will get rid of the paint ridges left after removing masking tape. But the area sanded will have a flat finish so it will be necessary to polish with car polish after sanding.

Usually when I have paint ridges I just leave them there until after I spray clear coat. I always wet sand and polish the clear coat which also removes any paint ridges.
 

Sooner Boomer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2011
Messages
3,203
Reaction score
771
Lightly sanding with 1000 grit then 2000 grit will get rid of the paint ridges left after removing masking tape. But the area sanded will have a flat finish so it will be necessary to polish with car polish after sanding.

Usually when I have paint ridges I just leave them there until after I spray clear coat. I always wet sand and polish the clear coat which also removes any paint ridges.
One important tip - WET sand! This keeps the sandpaper from clogging up.
 

Jason328K

Active Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2012
Messages
41
Reaction score
0
When I've had a dark color next to a light color I've had the problem of the dark being ground into the light color even when wet sanding. Any tips for solving that issue?
 

Nathan

TRF Supporter
Joined
Apr 20, 2012
Messages
2,130
Reaction score
437
When I've had a dark color next to a light color I've had the problem of the dark being ground into the light color even when wet sanding. Any tips for solving that issue?
I have seen that happen with wetsanding but it was only on the surface and easily came off with some polish (automotive swirl remover polish).
 

Jason328K

Active Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2012
Messages
41
Reaction score
0
Thanks. I'll try the polish next time I have that problem.
 

Rktman

Eric
TRF Supporter
Joined
Mar 5, 2017
Messages
1,241
Reaction score
181
Lightly sanding with 1000 grit then 2000 grit will get rid of the paint ridges left after removing masking tape. But the area sanded will have a flat finish so it will be necessary to polish with car polish after sanding.

Usually when I have paint ridges I just leave them there until after I spray clear coat. I always wet sand and polish the clear coat which also removes any paint ridges.
I tried some Rust-Oleum clear enamel over my colored enamel paints and it did some weird stuff, like dissolving some spots and bubbling up patches of the underlying paint. I made sure not to lay it on too heavy. Any idea why it would do that? Bad batch maybe?
 

Micromeister

Micro Craftman/ClusterNut
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
15,074
Reaction score
47
Location
Washington DC
Wet sanding with 600 to 2000 grit sandpaper is one way to remove really thick Heavy a Paint dams but as Nathan mentioned it really dulls down the finish.
A better way is to use 3m Perfect-it-III for those really thick Heavy paint dams or (preferred) 3m Finessit-II just takes a bit longer as it is a much finer Polishing medium.
Leaves the areas smooth as a babies but and High Gloss to boot.
Both materials are on the expensive side (22.00 +) a quart but well worth it in providing a method of removing surface imperfections, dust, hair and paint dams without dulling the surface.
Using ONLY Finessit-II I've removed not only mulit-color paint dams. but also actual "Brush marks" from Rattle Can & Hand painted camouflage PMC paint patterns. To the touch there is no difference in paint level.

RKTman: I think I've mentioned before if you really want to get into proper paint techniques Please Visit www.narhams.org website. from the left hand menu go to the Library section. Once there look for the Tech Tip folder. Down load (FREE) Tech Tips-002 to 005 on prep and Finishing. These in depth studies will take you from Raw Wood & cardboard to babies butt smooth finishes ANYONE can produce from rattle can and bottle paints. I've updated these Tech Tips recently with new data and techniques that should help answer many of your questions.

170_F104-G-StarFighter-PMC_32nd.jpg
 

Rktman

Eric
TRF Supporter
Joined
Mar 5, 2017
Messages
1,241
Reaction score
181
Wet sanding with 600 to 2000 grit sandpaper is one way to remove really thick Heavy a Paint dams but as Nathan mentioned it really dulls down the finish.
A better way is to use 3m Perfect-it-III for those really thick Heavy paint dams or (preferred) 3m Finessit-II just takes a bit longer as it is a much finer Polishing medium.
Leaves the areas smooth as a babies but and High Gloss to boot.
Both materials are on the expensive side (22.00 +) a quart but well worth it in providing a method of removing surface imperfections, dust, hair and paint dams without dulling the surface.
Using ONLY Finessit-II I've removed not only mulit-color paint dams. but also actual "Brush marks" from Rattle Can & Hand painted camouflage PMC paint patterns. To the touch there is no difference in paint level.

RKTman: I think I've mentioned before if you really want to get into proper paint techniques Please Visit www.narhams.org website. from the left hand menu go to the Library section. Once there look for the Tech Tip folder. Down load (FREE) Tech Tips-002 to 005 on prep and Finishing. These in depth studies will take you from Raw Wood & cardboard to babies butt smooth finishes ANYONE can produce from rattle can and bottle paints. I've updated these Tech Tips recently with new data and techniques that should help answer many of your questions.
I have some Finesse-It II and tried it, but maybe just didn't rub it in long enough. I'll give it another try with a good dose of patience thrown
in.
 

Rockiteer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2017
Messages
106
Reaction score
0
I have had tremendous success with ordinary baking soda with my model trains and static models over the years. My technique involves smearing a blop of dampened baking soda on the surface in question using an old toothbrush and simply rotate in a circular fashion till the paste dries then apply either some more water or another dose of dampened baking soda. To cleanse simply immerse the area then wipe away any residue. Remember, baking soda is a mild abrasive also used as an inexpensive way to whiten teeth! Got glowing compliments from one of the IPMS (International Plastic Modelers Society) judges at the 2005 national convention in Phoenix, AZ about the surface of my WWII Type VIIc u-boat model and how the camouflage pattern blended seamlessly without any inclination of masking whatsoever. Was rather proud of that compliment if I do say so myself.
 

Rktman

Eric
TRF Supporter
Joined
Mar 5, 2017
Messages
1,241
Reaction score
181
I have had tremendous success with ordinary baking soda with my model trains and static models over the years. My technique involves smearing a blop of dampened baking soda on the surface in question using an old toothbrush and simply rotate in a circular fashion till the paste dries then apply either some more water or another dose of dampened baking soda. To cleanse simply immerse the area then wipe away any residue. Remember, baking soda is a mild abrasive also used as an inexpensive way to whiten teeth! Got glowing compliments from one of the IPMS (International Plastic Modelers Society) judges at the 2005 national convention in Phoenix, AZ about the surface of my WWII Type VIIc u-boat model and how the camouflage pattern blended seamlessly without any inclination of masking whatsoever. Was rather proud of that compliment if I do say so myself.
Thanks, I'll try it on an isolated area first. It tends to dull the paint and so far other methods have chipped the paint dam line, making it uneven.
 

timbucktoo

Well-Known Member
Staff member
TRF Supporter
Global Mod
Joined
Jun 13, 2014
Messages
8,114
Reaction score
1,278
Location
Cocoa Beach
I have some Finesse-It II and tried it, but maybe just didn't rub it in long enough. I'll give it another try with a good dose of patience thrown
in.
Wet sanding requires a lot of patience but it will remove the paint dams!
 

Rktman

Eric
TRF Supporter
Joined
Mar 5, 2017
Messages
1,241
Reaction score
181
Wet sanding requires a lot of patience but it will remove the paint dams!
How do you prevent chipping along the demarcation line between the 2 colors? That's the problem I'm having, so that the line between the colors is no longer razor sharp as tiny flakes from the topmost color break off. I'm wondering if it has anything to do with my laying down a clear coat first along the tape line to seal it and prevent bleed through when I applied the 2nd color.
 

timbucktoo

Well-Known Member
Staff member
TRF Supporter
Global Mod
Joined
Jun 13, 2014
Messages
8,114
Reaction score
1,278
Location
Cocoa Beach
How do you prevent chipping along the demarcation line between the 2 colors? That's the problem I'm having, so that the line between the colors is no longer razor sharp as tiny flakes from the topmost color break off. I'm wondering if it has anything to do with my laying down a clear coat first along the tape line to seal it and prevent bleed through when I applied the 2nd color.
Never heard of the chipping as you describe but I only put clear coat on after all paint is applied.
What I do to prevent bleed through is hit the taped area with the same color I am painting over. This way any bleed though is same color and will seal tape and prevent topcoat from bleeding through.
 

Nathan

TRF Supporter
Joined
Apr 20, 2012
Messages
2,130
Reaction score
437
How do you prevent chipping along the demarcation line between the 2 colors? That's the problem I'm having, so that the line between the colors is no longer razor sharp as tiny flakes from the topmost color break off. I'm wondering if it has anything to do with my laying down a clear coat first along the tape line to seal it and prevent bleed through when I applied the 2nd color.
I only wet sand after I have sprayed clear coat, usually 4 or 5 coats. Check out my L3 Certification Build thread. I am now in the process of doing a 4 color paint job with lots of paint edges that need to be smoothed out. I'll be wet sanding it (all 14 feet of it) after I spray the clear coat.
 

Zeus-cat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
4,594
Reaction score
800
I have had tremendous success with ordinary baking soda with my model trains and static models over the years. My technique involves smearing a blop of dampened baking soda on the surface in question using an old toothbrush and simply rotate in a circular fashion till the paste dries then apply either some more water or another dose of dampened baking soda. To cleanse simply immerse the area then wipe away any residue. Remember, baking soda is a mild abrasive also used as an inexpensive way to whiten teeth! Got glowing compliments from one of the IPMS (International Plastic Modelers Society) judges at the 2005 national convention in Phoenix, AZ about the surface of my WWII Type VIIc u-boat model and how the camouflage pattern blended seamlessly without any inclination of masking whatsoever. Was rather proud of that compliment if I do say so myself.
Can you post a photo of the U-boat?
 

mpitfield

Moderator
Staff member
TRF Lifetime Supporter
Global Mod
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
Messages
4,903
Reaction score
431
Location
Toronto, Ontario
I lightly block sand with 600 wet between colours, but lightly. You just want to knock it down a bit then deal with making it flush on your clear. But a block is your friend in this case.
 
Top