Quote? What is your favorite quote?

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"The cause of Freedom and the cause of Peace are bound together."​

~Léon Blum​
 
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"Life is like an onion. You peel it off one layer at a time, and sometimes you weep."​
CARL SANDBURG​
 

"Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble."​
JOHN MADDEN​
 
"Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome."​
ARTHUR ASHE​
 
Criminals will continue to commit crime until we as a society make it more painful for them to commit the crime than not commit the crime.
 
John Keates, the poet who wrote Ode to a Grecian Urn, died at 25 years old or tuberculosis. I have long thought that the famous line of that poem, "Beauty is truth, truth beauty" to be the kind of romantic clap-trap that one expects from a young man who never fully grew up.

I would argue that while beauty is not, in itself, goodness, beauty is a good attribute and we should care more about it - particularly in our architecture and art.
I agree, beauty is both important and lacking in our world. But with one caveat. Architecture is taught at art schools, and also at engineering schools*. Beauty has an important place in architecture, yet architects who view what they do as primarily art have a tendency to make impractical buildings (that I personally also find un-beautiful). Frank Lloyd Wright designed some excellent buildings, but also said of one of his houses, I paraphrase, "When you live in such a beautiful place, who cares if the roof leaks?"

If there are any real architecture aficionados here, you might know the names Simon Eisinger and/or Sebastian Gray. They are cousins, my cousins, and both educated at MIT.
 
John Keates, the poet who wrote Ode to a Grecian Urn, died at 25 years old or tuberculosis. I have long thought that the famous line of that poem, "Beauty is truth, truth beauty" to be the kind of romantic clap-trap that one expects from a young man who never fully grew up.
While I can understand where you're coming from with that interpretation, I can kind of see what Keates is saying if I consider that truth and beauty should both be things that are uplifting and inspiring.
 
Reminds me of something I read decades ago.
Don't remember who said it, but I shall paraphrase:
"The most beautiful flower in the world will not last one generation if it does not have the hardiness to survive in the wild."

As for Tolstoy's quote, I don't interpret it as saying that all things beautiful aren't good.
I see it as saying that just because something is beautiful does not equate that with being good.
It may be good, it may not.
It should be evaluated on its' own merits, in addition to beauty.
 
John Keates, the poet who wrote Ode to a Grecian Urn, died at 25 years old or tuberculosis. I have long thought that the famous line of that poem, "Beauty is truth, truth beauty" to be the kind of romantic clap-trap that one expects from a young man who never fully grew up.


I agree, beauty is both important and lacking in our world. But with one caveat. Architecture is taught at art schools, and also at engineering schools*. Beauty has an important place in architecture, yet architects who view what they do as primarily art have a tendency to make impractical buildings (that I personally also find un-beautiful). Frank Lloyd Wright designed some excellent buildings, but also said of one of his houses, I paraphrase, "When you live in such a beautiful place, who cares if the roof leaks?"

If there are any real architecture aficionados here, you might know the names Simon Eisinger and/or Sebastian Gray. They are cousins, my cousins, and both educated at MIT.
My mom was a historical building consultant for a few years and she had/has a friend who worked on a Loyd building, she said it’s everything she can do to make it not fall over!
 
While I can understand where you're coming from with that interpretation, I can kind of see what Keates is saying if I consider that truth and beauty should both be things that are uplifting and inspiring.
I agree with the idea you see in Keates; truth and beauty do have that in common. I just don't see it there in Keates's words; I see him seizing on one common characteristic and concluding that these things are the same. Some say I'm "poetically impaired", and they're right.


As for Tolstoy's quote, I don't interpret it as saying that all things beautiful aren't good.
I see it as saying that just because something is beautiful does not equate that with being good.
It may be good, it may not.
It should be evaluated on its' own merits, in addition to beauty.
Agreed. There are many things that are both beautiful and good, likewise ugly and bad. But there are plenty of things that are the reverse, and it's the belief that pretty bad things and ugly good things don't exist that Tolstoy derides. I would even grant that being good helps make a thing beautiful (figuratively) but it's not enough, and the absence of goodness does not condemn a thing to ugliness.

And that's why I brought up the Keates thing. The world is full of beautiful lies and ugly truths, just as it has beautiful truths and ugly lies. And I would grant that being true helps an idea to be beautiful, but is not enough by itself. The two pairings of characteristics - goodness and beauty; truth and beauty - are very similar, in this and other ways.

So, to bring this back around to quotes:
When I see the clouds form a black summer windstorm​
That uproots the harvest and hurls it away​
In the midst of such anger, destruction and danger​
The storm's even beautiful in its own way​

Not to be confused with Ray Stevens's song of the same name.
 
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“To affect the quality of the day, that is the highest of arts.”​
HENRY DAVID THOREAU​

Make you own day great and don't let anyone else ruin it.
 
“If you don't have time to do it right, when will you have the time to do it over?”​
JOHN WOODEN​
 
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