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David Schwantz

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Just got my kit to make igniters last night. It does have instructions, but do you guys have any well earned do and don'ts on making them? Thanks.
 

kuririn

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Don't smoke a cigarette when adding the acetone. :eek:

Seriously though, the mixture will harden if not stored in an airtight container.
(Assuming you're talking about the Quick Dip, as they have several mixtures.)
It can be reconstituted with more acetone if it's thick and pasty, but not when it has dried rock hard.
Check the consistency every couple of weeks or so.
Dip as many igniters as you can in one sitting. It can do hundreds.
 
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David Schwantz

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Was not going to smoke, but I have it sitting on my reloading bench :)
 

GalantVR41062

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I store my containers in a Mason jar with a simple stir stick. I have had the acetone stay in the container for months, then mix it before and as I use it.

I used Quick burst, some left over delay element shavings and black powder to make my initiators very energetic:
Estes sonic ignitors
Estes BP ignitors
Aerotech first fire minis

VideoCapture_20200628-013603.jpg


These work well with my 12volt launch box flying rockets at the parks etc.

~John
 

David Schwantz

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Thanks John. I am going to try to make them like Wildmans with that little tube around the compound. Do you just mix in the BP with the dip?
 

GalantVR41062

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I used a small mixing cup, mix the stuff and dipped the initiators. I was not sure I would want the entire batch mixed that way.
 

cerving

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I got some that I haven't used yet. They tell you to use it within something like 4 days, and that it's not reconstitutible. I've been waiting for a dead day so I can dip a whole package of Chinese ematches.
 

David Schwantz

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Hi Bat, I had looked at those already. So that is a choice. Thanks.
 

Buzzard

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I use Quickburst products, but also have used and like the Frankum igniters. Not a bad price for a pack of 10.

Chas
 

prfesser

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How to explain the difference between mixtures and compounds?
A mixture can have different compositions. "Pure maple syrup" is actually a (chemical) misnomer, because it's a mixture of sugar (several different ones) water, and a bunch of flavorings. Some brands have more sugars than others do. In fact maple syrup is made by changing the composition of sap---removing water by boiling the sap and increasing the proportion of sugars and flavorings.

A compound always has the same composition. Pure table salt (sodium chloride) is a compound that always contains 22.99 g of sodium and 35.45 g chlorine for every 58.44 g salt, no matter where it comes from (the numbers are from the periodic table). Sea salt, kosher salt, etc. are technically mixtures, though they always have very high concentrations of pure sodium chloride.

Pure ammonium perchlorate is a compound, always has the same proportions of hydrogen, chlorine, nitrogen, and oxygen, no matter what the particle size or source. APCP is a mixture because it can have different proportions of AP, binder, catalyst, aluminum, magnesium, etc.

Best -- Terry (username relevant:))
 

neil_w

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A compound always has the same composition. Pure table salt (sodium chloride) is a compound that always contains 22.99 g of sodium and 35.45 g chlorine for every 58.44 g salt, no matter where it comes from (the numbers are from the periodic table). Sea salt, kosher salt, etc. are technically mixtures, though they always have very high concentrations of pure sodium chloride.
To add a bit of flavor to this discussion...

Table salt (at least in the US) is almost always a mixture, containing (in addition to NaCl) an iodide, possibly dextrose, and possibly anti-caking agents, although indeed pure table salt can be purchased (I'm not sure I've seen it in a store, though). Kosher salt is never iodized, and is often virtually pure NaCl (some brands may add anti-caking agents). That, along with its larger crystal size, is why it is generally preferred in cooking.

Sea salt is another matter altogether.
 

Bat-mite

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A compound is an adhesion of atoms to form a new substance. A mixture is different elements or compounds mixed together without any molecular adhesion.

As an example, two hydrogen atoms and an oxygen atom form H2O, or water. Two hydrogen atoms and two oxygen atoms form hydrogen peroxide, which is poisonous if ingested. Neither of these is the same thing as just mixing some liquid hydrogen with some liquid oxygen.
 

schneijt

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Has anyone tried the Frankum Performance launch pads?
Yes! His launch pads are great. Very easy to set up, not too heavy or complex, and priced well. I bought one for my local club to use, as they didn’t have a big pad for my really big rockets that I love to fly. Just beware that the stock blast deflector is aluminum, and he recommends you use a stand-off to keep the rocket a couple feet from the blast deflector. Not knowing that, I didn’t do so and punched a hole through it with the first flight. I asked him if he could make a steel one to replace it, and he did for us.

Note that you’ll need to do some drilling and such to attach your rail to his pads using your method of choice. If you don’t already have them, some hardened cutting drill bits in various sizes and some cutting oil are good to have.
 
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