Question: Can you "unmix" a liquid?

Discussion in 'The Watering Hole' started by OverTheTop, Jun 16, 2019.

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  1. Jun 16, 2019 #1

    OverTheTop

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    Question: Can you "unmix" a liquid?
    Answer: It depends.




    :cool:
     
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  2. Jun 17, 2019 #2

    Zeus-cat

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    That was really cool.
     
  3. Jun 17, 2019 #3

    jqavins

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    Yes, it's cool. But the answer isn't "It depends"; the answer is "No, but you can fake the mixing part in a really cool way."
     
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  4. Jun 17, 2019 #4

    Steve Shannon

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    Of course liquids can be unmixed. That’s what distillation does.
     
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  5. Jun 17, 2019 #5

    Bat-mite

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    As well as centrifuges for separating plasma from hemoglobin.
     
  6. Jun 17, 2019 #6

    Wallace

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    Mythbusters did the reverse footage "foolery" thing, was really cool. They do build giant cyclonic waste separators in another part of my shop, but I suspect that's more about separating solids from liquid waste...
     
  7. Jun 17, 2019 #7

    Charles_McG

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    Or fractional crystallization.
     
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  8. Jun 17, 2019 #8

    Jim Hinton

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    Yes you can unmix fluids in a variety of ways. That is a whole lot of what we do in water treatment.

    Jim
     
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  9. Jun 17, 2019 #9

    OverTheTop

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    I stumbled on the video as part of an investigation in to how to mix fluids. Not entirely trivial in the way we need to do it.
     
  10. Jun 18, 2019 #10

    Wallace

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    Freezing? Or would that just be considered "separating" liquids?
     
  11. Jun 18, 2019 #11

    Steve Shannon

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    Unmixing is separating.
     
  12. Jun 18, 2019 #12

    dhbarr

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    Why do they call it applejack if it doesn't taste like apples? :-D
     
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  13. Jun 18, 2019 #13

    Wallace

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    And at what point does an increaser become a reducer? This is exactly the kinda &@#$ that keeps me up at night....
     
  14. Jun 18, 2019 #14

    Wallace

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    And don't get me started on "Flammable" and "Inflammable"..
     
  15. Jun 18, 2019 #15

    OverTheTop

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    I believe one is of English and one is of French origin, hence the two slightly different words.
     
  16. Jun 18, 2019 #16

    jqavins

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    No, "flamable" was an error that stuck. "Inflamable" means "can be inflamed", but looks and sounds like the opposite of "flamable", a la visible and in ivisible, tolerable and intolerable, etc. So flamable appeared as an erroneous back creation, and now we can't get rid of it.

    Isn't that when you turn it around? But when does a twig become a stick, or a stick a log? When does a wire become a rod? (I could go on.)
     
  17. Jun 18, 2019 #17

    OverTheTop

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    No. Latin origin (sorry, I thought I remembered French, and that could still be the case too ;)).

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/flammable-or-inflammable
    "The Latin Inflammare
    That would make sense—if inflammable had started out as an English word. We get inflammable from the Latin verb inflammare, which combines flammare ("to catch fire") with a Latin prefix in-, which means "to cause to." This in- shows up occasionally in English words, though we only tend to notice it when the in- word is placed next to its root word for comparison: impassive and passive, irradiated and radiated, inflame and flame. Inflammable came into English in the early 1600s.

    Things were fine until 1813, when a scholar translating a Latin text coined the English word flammable from the Latin flammare, and now we had a problem: two words that look like antonyms but are actually synonyms. There has been confusion between the two words ever since."
     
  18. Jun 18, 2019 #18

    dshmel

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    While never featured in an episode, there was a super molecular liquid separator in the bat cave that is a convenient method for separating liquids:

    SMDS.gif
     
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  19. Jun 18, 2019 #19

    Charles_McG

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    Try a different distillery.
    (Mine tastes like apple blossoms, rather than apple juice.)
     
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  20. Jun 18, 2019 #20

    Peartree

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    Flammable means the same thing as inflammable, its the same with ravel and unravel, loosen and unloosen, thaw and unthaw.

    English is just weird.

    Merriam Webster: When "un" Isn't Negative
     

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