Queensland ute driver going 100kph uses knife to battle brown snake trying to bite him between his legs

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OverTheTop

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Funkworks

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I suppose my story involving a slinky doesn't really compare.

So anyway, a slinky fell by my feet while driving so I quickly picked it up.
:blowingbubbles:
 

TSMILLER

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You “quickly” picked up a slinky?
I envision grabbing the first coil and going from there!
 

Funkworks

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You “quickly” picked up a slinky?
I envision grabbing the first coil and going from there!
I had visions of having my feet entangled with the pedals. But it was the mini version, so the whole thing came up in one swift scoop. But yeah. I guess it's not quite in the same league as 3-6 foot, attacking, venomous snake, followed by speeding, a police interception, and an ER visit.
 

OverTheTop

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Browns are far more aggressive than the red-bellied blacks. I have been chased by a brown that got a bit annoyed I was too close to it (I hadn't seen it).
 

SecondRow

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TIL:
what a ute is;
that I don’t want to go to Australia. I think I’ll go to New Zealand again, where not everything will try to kill me.
 

RocketDestroyer

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Many years ago my wife and I lived in Mackay, Queensland in a duplex. One night as we were drifting off to sleep we were woken by yelling and the sounds of a pitched battle in the flat next door. The next morning I asked the neighbor what the commotion was all about. He said his wife had gone down to the laudry room to get the washing and had been surprised by a large snake. I asked him what kind of snake it was and he replied that it "was a bloody dead snake." I never liked going down to our laundry room after that night. I never met a snake while we lived there and I'm glad I didn't. There was this huge spider...
 

boatgeek

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Australia is safe if you are sensible, mostly 😂.
Ahem. I give you the gympie stinger (aka suicide bush). Take it away, Wikipedia:

Contact with the leaves or twigs causes the hollow, silica-tipped hairs to break off and penetrate the skin and inject the toxins.[10] The hairs cause an extremely painful stinging sensation that could last from several hours to 1–2 days, recurring to a lessening degree for several months or more whenever the area is touched, exposed to water, or subjected to temperature change. The injured area becomes covered with small, red spots joining together to form a red, swollen welt. The hairs are also believed to be released to the air when the plant is cut or cleared in large areas. Workers without respiratory protection have reported sneezing, runny noses, mild nasal bleeding and throat irritation while cutting or clearing. Ernie Rider, who was slapped in the face and torso with the foliage in 1963, said:

For two or three days the pain was almost unbearable; I couldn’t work or sleep, then it was pretty bad pain for another fortnight or so. The stinging persisted for two years and recurred every time I had a cold shower. ... There's nothing to rival it; it's ten times worse than anything else.
 

OverTheTop

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Ahem. I give you the gympie stinger (aka suicide bush).
Yeah, you don't want to run into one of those. Those silica needles are full of multiple (over a dozen IIRC) neurotoxins. Learn what they look like and stay away from them. Not entirely common in the rainforest. Mainly near the margins and near man-made disturbances in the forests. If a horse runs into one of them the cure is shooting it.
 

jd2cylman

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Yeah, you don't want to run into one of those. Those silica needles are full of multiple (over a dozen IIRC) neurotoxins. Learn what they look like and stay away from them. Not entirely common in the rainforest. Mainly near the margins and near man-made disturbances in the forests. If a horse runs into one of them the cure is shooting it.
What good is shooting the plant??? A little late isn't it? :dontknow: :cool::cool:🤪
 

Cape Byron

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So, in what region of Australia do I have the least chance of being killed by the flora and/or fauna?
Well, that's a question. Prolly no further than Customs at the airport. :D 🇦🇺

Seriously, you get used to having this stuff around you. The worst thing that has ever bitten me was a 2 metre Diamond Python. Hurt like hell, but not poisonous. ;) He was sunning himself on the deck I didn't see him and got too close. Bare feet... ouch. Not his fault, they're usually quiet enough to just be around with no dramas.
 

SecondRow

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Honestly, it's not the fact that there are so many things that can really muck up your day that gets me. It's that all those things seem to want to hang out in your homes.
 

Cape Byron

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Pythons are fine, really, although they will eat your chickens. Or, just crush them and say 'That's too big to eat, let's try another one...'

We have maybe six living around the farmhouse. Also Red-bellies, Browns, and we once had a Rough-Scale (very venomous) in the cutlery drawer...

Most Aussie critters are cute as and make living in the bush fantastic. The dangerous ones, well, just realise they are out there and wear shoes and gloves in the garden.

Spiders, well, part of life. Oh, we have Mosaic Scorpions on the property too.
 

dhbarr

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Et's the drup beahs you need to watch out for.
 

OverTheTop

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Ok, and Funnel-webs, and Redbacks. But the people are really nice :p.

Personally I have never been bitten by snakes, spiders or crocs. Bats and lizards yes. I have handled a lot of wildlife over the years. FYI I have seen redback inside our house, and I could probably find some outside if I went looking right now.
 
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ghostfather

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When I was down for Thunda Down Under last year, didn't see much in the way of dangerous critters in the Queensland bush.

There was no shortage of beer, though.
Interesting "discussions" when I asked which is the better beer, VB or XXXX. Aussies take that too seriously. ;)
 

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