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Pro Level Rockets???

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acesb422

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I want to move into some of the bigger rockets that use G size motors. But i am wondering what is it that makes them pro level?? Is it what it takes to build them or what they require to fly. I look at Hobbylinc and all the rockets i think would be fun to fly are all pro level. I just want to know what that all includes. Thanks for the help!
 

Pantherjon

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Just a named category Hobbylinc came up with..Nothing really HARD about the rockets listed in their 'Pro Series' listing..
 

RoyAtl

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I want to move into some of the bigger rockets that use G size motors. But i am wondering what is it that makes them pro level?? Is it what it takes to build them or what they require to fly. I look at Hobbylinc and all the rockets i think would be fun to fly are all pro level. I just want to know what that all includes. Thanks for the help!
Might've been a leftover term from a long time ago when Estes offered their "Pro-Series" rockets.

The Aerotech rockets are a little different from standard model rocket construction in that they use a combination of plastics and cardboard, and along with the four LOC rockets they require CA and/or Epoxy for construction, and larger launch equipment. But that's about it.
 

MarkII

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It is salesman-talk for "more expensive kits."

Mark K.
 

MattieShoes

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I want to move into some of the bigger rockets that use G size motors. But i am wondering what is it that makes them pro level?? Is it what it takes to build them or what they require to fly. I look at Hobbylinc and all the rockets i think would be fun to fly are all pro level. I just want to know what that all includes. Thanks for the help!
Having recently built my first Aerotech rocket, I'd say they're easier than a lot of the Estes type kits, especially the older ones from when I was a kid. They introduce a couple things that aren't found in the little hobby kits like their baffle system and through-the-wall fins, but the actual building is easy and the instructions are clear. The hardest part is getting the fins to snap into place... You have to use a fair amount of force but you don't want to accidentally crease the body tube.

I also recently got my first LOC kit, and it's just as easy as the smaller kits, though the kit did not come with any sort of motor retention scheme -- They leave you to your own devices there.
 

kelltym88

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Try Madcow Rocketry http://www.madcowrocketry.com/servlet/StoreFront

I do not have anything against Aerotech, but Madcow has some great kits to get you started in this area, and they are super easy to build. And the customer service is top notch. They have motor retention options available, too.
 

MarkII

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It is salesman-talk for "more expensive kits."

Mark K.
I should add that they are more expensive because they are usually larger and the components are made from sturdier materials. But "professional level kit" isn't a phrase or a concept that is used in hobby rocketry; it is salesman-speech. I think the web store is just trying to say that these kits aren't for rank beginners, and, as I mentioned before, to provide some shorthand way of saying why they are more expensive than the other kits there. If you are buying online, it can be hard to see just from the little pictures that are attached to each product listing why those rocket kits carry much higher price tags than the kits from, say, Estes or Quest. The "professional level" label gives you sort a clue that they are indeed different from the other kits.

Mark K.
 

UPscaler

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It is salesman-talk for "more expensive kits."

Mark K.
:roll:


There really isn't much difference. I believe they just mean it requires slightly more skill than your average low power rocket.

A good rocket that is tall, and flies great for a good price is the Aerotech HV arcas, I have one and love it. It is a scale model of a military sounding rocket, and is, I believe, 60% scale.

Another great company to consider is Madcow Rocketry. They have some nice mid and high power kits available.
 

mkadams001

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My Ni Hao kit is designed for the person who wants to enter into mid power and use 29mm motors. It is easy to build and I put a lot of detail into the instructions. This is part of the reason that I started my company was to provide a way for those moving up from low power to mid power can do so without feeling intimidated by what would appear to be a more difficult build.
 

MattieShoes

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I should add that they are more expensive because they are usually larger and the components are made from sturdier materials. But "professional level kit" isn't a phrase or a concept that is used in hobby rocketry; it is salesman-speech. I think the web store is just trying to say that these kits aren't for rank beginners, and, as I mentioned before, to provide some shorthand way of saying why they are more expensive than the other kits there. If you are buying online, it can be hard to see just from the little pictures that are attached to each product listing why those rocket kits carry much higher price tags than the kits from, say, Estes or Quest. The "professional level" label gives you sort a clue that they are indeed different from the other kits.

Mark K.
Indeed, size is tough to get a feel for online. Here's an image of my barracuda (one of the aforementioned "pro" rockets) next to an estes swift (RIP) and a pepsi can. While I'm sure you pay a little bit of a premium for a kit with decals an instructions vs. scratch building, the parts in the kit are surely significantly more expensive than the little hobby rockets.

scale.jpg
 
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