Plant life at your launch site

terryg

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What kind of plant life or scenery have you seen while chasing down your rockets.

Barrel cactus responds to the monsoon rains in Tucson, Az
 

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DabCat

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Here at the rocket range on Lucerne Dry lakebed, there is a large abundance of a plant well known among visitors to the lakebed. Better known as "dirt", dirt can be found on nearly every surface of the lakebed. The smooth tan surface of the dirt results a beautiful, picturesque scenery, very popular among photographers who all have a common love for rocketry. During the rainy season, the dirt can morph colors, and change into a beautiful shade of darker brown.
Screenshot_20220815-184147_Gallery.jpg

In all seriousness though, we do have beautiful sunsets and the mountains in the distance make for a beautiful scenery. Not much in the way of plant life though except for the various clusters of rocket (and trash; don't release your mylar balloons!!!!) eating bushes.
 

bjphoenix

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We fly in a farm and on a small field that would be considered a vacant lot. The farm usually has some form of grass, not too hard to find rockets in. The vacant lot has weeks that can be 6" tall stalks or they can be 5' tall full blown green weeds that make recovery very difficult. On the positive side both fields are always relatively soft so fin breakage is not a problem.
 

terryg

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Here at the rocket range on Lucerne Dry lakebed, there is a large abundance of a plant well known among visitors to the lakebed. Better known as "dirt", dirt can be found on nearly every surface of the lakebed. The smooth tan surface of the dirt results a beautiful, picturesque scenery, very popular among photographers who all have a common love for rocketry. During the rainy season, the dirt can morph colors, and change into a beautiful shade of darker brown.
View attachment 532709

In all seriousness though, we do have beautiful sunsets and the mountains in the distance make for a beautiful scenery. Not much in the way of plant life though except for the various clusters of rocket (and trash; don't release your mylar balloons!!!!) eating bushes.
I recall a night launch at Lucern. A very clear night with stars everywhere and the moon rising over the mountains, as I recovered my rockets.
 

Donnager

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corn.. and grass.. And among the grasses we have a few milkweed plants, bulrushes in the ditches, and other assorted wildflowers flowers n such

For me as well. They land great on short mowed sod. Finding them in the corn can be a trick.

I think they spray for most of the odd "non grass" stuff.
 

astronwolf

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We have a dreadful assortment of glossy buckthorn, multiflora rose, canadian thistle, poison ivy, poison hemlock, wild parsnip, teasel, and a host of other invasive plants the local "conservationists" seem very keen on preserving.
 

Rob Campbell

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We have a dreadful assortment of glossy buckthorn, multiflora rose, canadian thistle, poison ivy, poison hemlock, wild parsnip, teasel, and a host of other invasive plants the local "conservationists" seem very keen on preserving.
Cool avatar. I'm probably one of the few who knows where it came from.
 

astronwolf

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Cloud William doesn't care about the nasty plants that steadily encroach our field. He fights a war of attrition.
 
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