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pets are like children esp when sick

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CharlaineC

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Ok so the past few days my dog noah has been acting strange. its been scaring me but today it got worse when he lost all function is his back legs. so my father and I rushed him to the vet. after what felt like an eternity we finlly where seen. the docter basicly said its his back due to his breed dachound. they gave him a cortizone shot and some meds to take home. I have to keep him caged intill he shows signs of feeling in his back legs. I'm so scared it hurts. i'm sorry for dropping this here but you all are like my extended family.
 

mach7

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Sorry Noah is having a rough time. How old is he?

My thoughts are with you.
 

Peartree

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Charlaine,

Sorry to hear about your friend. I know someone who might point you to more help or at least provide moral support. Susa's Sunroom is a place where a lot of pet owners hang out. Susa (Sue) has a dachshund that has had a similar problem on and off. I don't post there but I know some of the folk there. Good people, I'm sure they'll be very helpful and supportive. Politics is fair game and a frequent topic of conversation but it has to stay polite.

http://www.runboard.com/bsusassunroom

PS. If you say some rocket nut sent you, Sue will know it was me...
 

davel

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I can sure relate to the thread subject. We just went through something similar with our Shih Tzu. She suddenly became hesitant to walk and would lay down as soon as you set her down. Would go out to do her job, but then refuse to move and need to be rescued.

Long story short... she had a partial ACL tear in her right knee. Pain killers and rest and after a month she is just about back to normal - a bit more spoiled than before though.

Actually, it's worse than a kid. At least a kid can tell you when/where it hurts. In an animal, you are pretty much left guessing if they hurt or not.

Take care of that little guy. Give him a couple of scritches for me.
 

MarkII

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Ok so the past few days my dog noah has been acting strange. its been scaring me but today it got worse when he lost all function is his back legs. so my father and I rushed him to the vet. after what felt like an eternity we finlly where seen. the docter basicly said its his back due to his breed dachound. they gave him a cortizone shot and some meds to take home. I have to keep him caged intill he shows signs of feeling in his back legs. I'm so scared it hurts. i'm sorry for dropping this here but you all are like my extended family.
Sorry to hear that Charlaine. I have taken care of several generations of pets over the past 30 years, so I know what you are going through. :(

And, believe it or not, I also kind of know what Noah is going through, too, because I suffer from a similar problem (with very similar symptoms), even though I'm a different breed of dog... ;)

MarkII
 

rokitflite

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You know MY feelings about furry critters... My thoughts are with you and Noah.
 

Pippen

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Sorry to hear that, Charlaine. I've got a big ornery cat that I'm crazy about and it's always upsetting when he's sick.
 

Gillard

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Charlaine,

Sorry to hear about your dog, i remember when my dogs have been ill, you would bear the pain for them if you could.
 

CharlaineC

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I hate haveing to have him caged. he is in the living room but it sucks I fear he thinks he is in trouble.
I have no clue what to do. I pricked his feet today and nothing. I was able to get him to eat some pasta and gravy so he got his morning meds. I was able to get him to go potty but not poo. i'm doing all the research i can. I'm also researching doggie wheel chairs most likely if we have to go this rout I will build it myself.
 

GaryT

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I for one Completely! Understand, I've been married for over 20 years with NO kids, So my Dog Kain (English Bull Terrier) IS! my son, Not to mention my 3 cats and 100 Gallon salt water fish tank, To be Honest I like animals MUCH! more than People, Best! of luck. -G-
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El Cheapo

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Hopefully that'll do the trick? Did your Vet mention anything about it "not" being a mild stroke? It might be completely unrelated but one of my horses had a mild stroke, two actually. Both times she regained use of her back end. She lived the good life for another six years. She just walked a little slower.
 

CharlaineC

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no they never said. they where tring to keep the price down for me. I wounder if I could teach him to use my old wheel chair. then again might cause trouble too:).

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davel

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Strokes are extremely rare in dogs. On the other hand, back problems are quite common in dachshunds. If the vet puts Noah on long term NSAIDs (Rimadyl, Deramaxx, Metacam, ect), just be sure to keep a close look out for side effects.

http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2006/506_nsaid.html
 
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Pippen

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If you're having trouble getting food and/or meds into him, try chicken baby food.
 

chanstevens

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Yup, found that out about a month or so ago when my 15-yr old Shorgi (Sheltie/Corgi mix) developed a case of Vestibular Syndrome. We thought it was a stroke from the symptoms, scared the holy crap out of us. :(


what_is_canine_vestibular_syndrome
Not to scare/depress anyone, but our 6-year old dog recently went through a spat that the vet thought, best case, was vestibular syndrome because the other suspects were basically not curable (stroke, brain tumor, etc.). Doped her up on steroids, seemed to revive her for a couple days. Vet said it would take a couple weeks to play out if vestibular. 10 days and it started getting worse, so went 2 hours north to a neurologist, who took a brain X-ray and said "for about $3000 we can learn which of 4 different things is about to kill her, possibly extending her life between 2 weeks and 6 months". I was out of the country and just debilitated from the shock/grief, and my wife and son had to deal with this. Vet gave her a massive dose of steroids, knocking out her immune system, hoping that would at least alleviate the most likely of the 4 potential threats. No luck--the dog died while I was on the plane heading home.

My boss seemed surprised that I'd treat this as a personal emergency and reschedule to get home. I tend to think anyone who thinks dogs/pets are "just animals" has either never had a dog or never deserved one...

I hope all works out with yours, Charlaine, as you've had some tough breaks and certainly deserve the unconditional love of a good dog.
 

MarkII

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I'm no vet, nor am I very experienced with dogs (the canine kind), but I just have a gut feeling that it is arthritis or a disk problem, or both. If it is, then cortisone epidurals, followed by NSAIDs and rest should help, but watch out for gastric irritation. The doggie wheelchair may not be a bad idea, if it takes the stress off of the affected area and allows it to heal. He may not need it permanently. Consult with your vet.

We humans have a propensity for developing lower back injuries, but we have some advantages over quadripeds. As part of our evolution of upright posture and bipedal locomotion, we developed very strong trunk and abdominal muscles; these are all but absent in animals that walk on four legs. Our body parts are all arranged in vertical fashion to be centered and balanced on two relatively long and strong legs. The human spine functions as a vertical column, and it is very resistant to the pull of gravity that would cause it to collapse upon itself. The body layout of a quadriped, such as a canine, is all horizontal, with the body parts all hanging in a sack underneath the spine. The spine in four-legged creatures acts sort of like a suspension bridge, spanning the horizontal distance between the shoulders and the hips, with extensions to support the head and to supply a tail.

Muscles in the animal's back act as the suspension cables for this bridge, keeping it straight and in line. Canines, like people, lose strength and muscle mass as they age. So as dogs get older, the muscles that suspend this spinal bridge get weaker, causing the bridge to sag. Because the backbone in all vertebrates also contains the spinal cord, this sagging can cause some pressure or pinching of the spinal nerves that exit the backbone between each vertebral member. This is a common cause of spinal arthritis, and all quadripeds, including dogs, will develop arthritic backs eventually. In dog breeds that have long spines, the strength needed to keep the spine straight and level is greater, and so the inevitable weakening of the stabilizing muscles has a greater or at least more rapidly developing impact on the health of the spinal nerves. Dogs with relatively short legs have less bone mass and muscle and connective tissue mass in their legs to absorb the shocks and stresses of normal activities like walking and running. So the combination of short legs and a long spine is a sure recipe for trouble for a quadriped. Guess which dog breed is known for having a long spine and short legs?

MarkII
 

sandmantoy

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I used to have a Boxer she passed away at age 14, it has been 3 1/2 years since she passed and I am just now ready to get a new pup. Best thing for a human soul is letting a pet be part of your life. Being a dog person I feel your pain and hope for you the best. I like animals better than people. I am picking up my new pup this weekend.
 
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MarkII

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I used to have a Boxer she passed away at age 14, it has been 3 1/2 years since she passed and I am just now ready to get a new pup. Best thing for a human soul is letting a pet be part of your life. Being a dog person I feel your pain and hope for you the best. I like animals better than people. I am picking up my new pup this weekend.
I have never kept a dog (well, not permanently), but I sure could go for one that looks like that! :)

MarkII
 

Pippen

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How's your pup doing this morning, Charlaine?
 

evil ed

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I hope someday to be as good a person as my dog thinks I am.
 

CharlaineC

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well this morning he is tring to walk he has some feeling (not much but some) he tries to stand in the tub when he goes potty but it is still hard. He is drinking again witch is good. I'm aching like mad. I really hate haveing him caged even though it is for his own safty.
 

davel

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That's good to hear Charlaine. From all the reading I did when investigating what might be our dog's problem, rest is the proper treatment for disc issues. It's hard, and it's a long road back, but keeping his activity to a minimum will be his best chance of a full recovery. I'm sure he knows you are only doing what is best for him.

Please keep us advised.
 

Mikus

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a spat that the vet thought, best case, was vestibular syndrome because the other suspects were basically not curable (stroke, brain tumor, etc.). Doped her up on steroids, seemed to revive her for a couple days. Vet said it would take a couple weeks to play out if vestibular.
Ach that sucks, sorry to hear it. The vet told us basically the same thing, if it didn't clear up in a couple of weeks it would be from something that would kill her. We got lucky and other than a persistent head tilt and some lingering unsteadyness she improved.
 

CharlaineC

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Ok so its now 0435 I woke up at 0400 to go potty so i put noah in the tub to potty as well. he is standing a little better on his hind legs not long but a little better. I am so happy that he is recovering. I woulder If I wore of on him. hehe. (ahh the joys and pains of walking how i love it) I have rehab this morning so I might be bringing him with me as i normally do but I am thinking of having him lay in my lap in the steam room this time or ask if one of the heat wraps can be ut on his back. I am going to call the vet and ah her what she thinks first. The heat has always helped me.

Thank you all so much.
 

MarkII

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Ok so its now 0435 I woke up at 0400 to go potty so i put noah in the tub to potty as well. he is standing a little better on his hind legs not long but a little better. I am so happy that he is recovering. I woulder If I wore of on him. hehe. (ahh the joys and pains of walking how i love it) I have rehab this morning so I might be bringing him with me as i normally do but I am thinking of having him lay in my lap in the steam room this time or ask if one of the heat wraps can be ut on his back. I am going to call the vet and ah her what she thinks first. The heat has always helped me.

Thank you all so much.
It might help with some of the discomfort, but as other people and I have mentioned, rest is the main thing, and the healing will take some time. I realize that it is probably hard to make Noah understand that, though, just as it is hard to make some of us bigger dogs understand and cooperate with the treatment plan. (I speak from personal experience... ;) ) Again, the vet is the best source for advice on this.

Mark
 
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