Perseverance Mars mission thread

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

JLP1

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
150
Reaction score
148
I understand the winds can get pretty high at times how do they keep it from getting blown over when it's parked ? Maybe a lame question but was just wondering. I know that if I don't pay attention out at the RC field a sudden gust can blow my planes over. Do they park the rover over it to provide some protection or must it stay out in the open all of the time?
 

davel

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
593
Reaction score
45
Keep in mind the density of the Martian atmosphere is only about 1% that of Earth. With such low density, even high winds put little force on an object.
 

JLP1

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
150
Reaction score
148
Yep didn't think about the atmosphere being so thin....
 

kuririn

BARGeezer
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
6,043
Reaction score
3,895
Location
Hawaii
I have read that they are going to try to push Genie over the next 4 flights to go as fast and as far as possible to test the envelope and learn as much information as possible for future designs.
Mimi Aung (Project Manager) said that she wouldn't be surprised if it crashes.
Maybe she's been watching too many Starship videos. 😁
 

Peartree

Cyborg Rocketeer
Staff member
Administrator
Global Mod
Joined
Jan 6, 2009
Messages
5,457
Reaction score
924
Location
Alliance, Ohio
I have read that they are going to try to push Genie over the next 4 flights to go as fast and as far as possible to test the envelope and learn as much information as possible for future designs.
Mimi Aung (Project Manager) said that she wouldn't be surprised if it crashes.
Maybe she's been watching too many Starship videos. 😁
She said something to the effect that they felt they could squeeze in four flights within the 30 day window. It seems that Genie was not designed to, and no one expect her to, survive beyond that 30 day window anyway. If that is the case, there doesn't seem to be anything to be gained by "playing it safe."
 

Funkworks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2018
Messages
1,404
Reaction score
1,003
Yep didn't think about the atmosphere being so thin....
Maybe enough to squeeze out 1kW per day with a wind turbine!

  • Step 1: Send robots to build a wind turbine.
  • Step 2: Use the turbine to charge batteries.
  • Step 3: Use the batteries to make oxygen with MOXIE. ("Aboard NASA’s Perseverance rover, MOXIE creates oxygen on Mars")
  • Step 4: Um ... burn the oxygen to warm a seed and grow a vegetable.
Who wouldn't want a Martian vegetable.
 

Winston

Lorenzo von Matterhorn
Joined
Jan 31, 2009
Messages
9,412
Reaction score
1,545
Perseverance Rover Panorama in 4K UHD

Made with MastcamZ images from Perseverance Rover / Sol 059 / Jezero Crater / Mars. Source data was denoised, repaired, graded and rescaled for this film.

 

kuririn

BARGeezer
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
6,043
Reaction score
3,895
Location
Hawaii
Aerial photos shot by Ingenuity:
First pic
1619436370338.png


Second pic
1619436404417.png


Third pic
1619436460519.png


You can see Percy's tracks. Also Genie's landing leg pads on the left and right sides.
Pics 1 and 2 you can also see Genie's shadow on the bottom.
Amazing.
 

Winston

Lorenzo von Matterhorn
Joined
Jan 31, 2009
Messages
9,412
Reaction score
1,545
The tech specs:

Mars Helicopter Technology Demonstrator
2018 AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference


Ingenuity overcomes watchdog issue for first extraterrestrial powered flight
April 20, 2021


Ingenuity uses Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 801 processor with a Linux operating system as the system controller. This is connected to two flight-control microcontroller units (Mto perform the necessary flight-control functions. It also carries an IMU and a Garmin LIDAR Lite v3 laser altimeter for navigation. Data is relayed to the Perseverance through a low power Zigbee wireless link using a 900MHz SiFlex 02 chipset providing 250 kbit/s bandwidth.

Ingenuity uses a ProASIC3 FPGA for the sensor fusion via an ARM Cortex-M1 soft processor, but it is the dual redundant flight controllers that are the key. These are based on the Texas Instruments TMS570LC43x, based around the ARM R5F real time floating point microcontroller core running at 300MHz. This would be where the watchdog timer issue was. Interestingly the flight code is public and has been uploaded to GitHub (https://github.com/nasa/fprime).


 
Top