Quantcast

Payload ideas

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

dragon_rider10

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2009
Messages
699
Reaction score
0
My recent purchase of a Nova payloader got me to think about what I might put in that clear tube.

Any interesting and educational payload suggestions? I know you're not supposed to launch live animals, so no bugs in this one. Other than altimeters and electronics, what are some suggestions?

I've tried to convince my daughter that one of her "Polly Pockets" would survive just fine, but she's dead set against it.
 

MarkII

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
8,212
Reaction score
9
That clear payload capsule presents some possibilities.

How about a micro-camcorder?

http://www.rocketryforum.com/showthread.php?t=6119

Another idea: slip in a couple of cyalume lightsticks (or coil up a cylalume necklace) into the capsule and launch it near dusk (pretty easy to do at this time of year). Your daughter can still play with the light sticks or necklace for a few hours afterward. If you are in a cold location, try not to let the light stick get too cold or else it might not be too bright. Keep it inside your coat while you set up your launch pad and prepare the rocket. Take it out and activate it, and then put it back inside your coat while it gets going. Then right before you are ready to launch, take it out and put it into the capsule, step back away and commence the countdown. Don't wait until it's too dark; launch it just a little before sunset, when things are getting dim but not totally dark.

You could also put Santa or a reindeer in the capsule and give them a ride.

MarkII
 
Last edited:

Micromeister

Micro Craftman/ClusterNut
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
15,074
Reaction score
37
Location
Washington DC
Many of us use our Clear payload section models as the basis for Night flying models. Filling these with custom built LED, Strobe or even bulb type battery powered NITE (Night Illumination Tracking Equipment) systems. Just about any size Clear Payload section can be converted in one way or another. Biggest thing is these custom illumination systems are fun to build, even for the youngest of rocketeers. I've had kids as young as 6 building simple LED/battery packages that they soldered up themselves....Only instructional and supervisorary "overlooking" by the adults LOL!!! It is/was a lot of fun for everyone in the group.

The NOVA Payloader is one of my almost yearly night flying vehicles, it's the model on the far right in the first pic below:)
Hope this helps.

221a1-sm_MM NITE-2000_LEDS payloader_12-03-99.jpg
 
Last edited:

TWRackers

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
2,117
Reaction score
1
My recent purchase of a Nova payloader got me to think about what I might put in that clear tube.

Any interesting and educational payload suggestions? I know you're not supposed to launch live animals, so no bugs in this one. Other than altimeters and electronics, what are some suggestions?

I've tried to convince my daughter that one of her "Polly Pockets" would survive just fine, but she's dead set against it.
Don't know if your daughter wants to hear this, but there is a precedent for that....

http://www.rocketryforumarchive.com/showpost.php?p=448692&postcount=13

:hohoho:
 

Pippen

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
1,969
Reaction score
3
Don't know if your daughter wants to hear this, but there is a precedent for that....
:
Barbie has been aloft as well!
http://www.airspacemag.com/space-exploration/You_Go_Girl.html?c=y&page=1

Be careful what you promise since there's no guarantee that a rocket will be recovered, lest Polly winds up tragically hanging from a tree or languishing on the roof of a school building. Much better it happen to an expendable crewman than a favorite toy. :p If you're wanting to involve your daughter, I'd suggest a trip to a thrift shop for an inexpensive launchable toy figure purchased for that purpose.
 

Gillard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
1,970
Reaction score
1
both my kids have a favourite toy where the world would come to an end if it was lost, and in a box at work there are identical toys just in case the unthinkable ever happened. you could do the same and launch "a spare" keeping the original in your pocket just in case......... she would never have to know!
 

MarkII

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
8,212
Reaction score
9
Barbie has been aloft as well!
http://www.airspacemag.com/space-exploration/You_Go_Girl.html?c=y&page=1

Be careful what you promise since there's no guarantee that a rocket will be recovered, lest Polly winds up tragically hanging from a tree or languishing on the roof of a school building. Much better it happen to an expendable crewman than a favorite toy. :p If you're wanting to involve your daughter, I'd suggest a trip to a thrift shop for an inexpensive launchable toy figure purchased for that purpose.
Use the person from the Enterprise landing party who is wearing the red shirt.

MarkII
 

KerryQuinn

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 6, 2009
Messages
136
Reaction score
0
More interesting use of clear payload bays....

1) If you are into "forrest mims" types electrical projects... how about connecting a solar cell to a small rechargable battery (or maybe a capacitor) and then launching it (at noon with sun directly overhead and with some spin on the rocket to keep the cell from always pointing the same direction). measure the voltage in the battery before and after the launch (and recording the number of seconds between these two measurements). Now discharge the battery, and repeat the test but with the rocket just sitting vertically on the ground for the same number of seconds. See if you can get more charge from getting higher in the atmosphere ?

2) build a circuit to count pulses or a timer to time the pulse interval and launch in the morning or evening with a CdS light sensitive cell in the payload to count spin rotations during flight as the cell "sees" the sun as it rotates on way up or down

3) build a mechanical accelerometer in the payload section: put a vertical metal pin/wire in the center of the payload running top to bottom of payload. Thread a spring from a "clicker" ballpoint pen on the pin and then thread a cork disk onto the pin so that it "rests" just touching the top end of the spring. Make sure the cork disk does not slide freely on the pin, but "sticks" in place slightly. Use 2 chutes on the rocket, one for payload and one for the body tube (no shock cord to connect the parts) With the thing assembled on the pad, look thru the clear tube and draw a line on the tube at the top of the cork disk. When you launch, there is a big upward G force - the mass of the cork will push "down" onto the spring as a result. This will compress the spring slightly and the stickyness of the cork (might?) keep the spring compressed until you recover the payload. Re look at the payload section and see of the top of the cork is now lower than before the launch. Launching the same rocket a couple times to see the compression on a B6-4 and then on a C6-5 you (might?) see that there is a higher G force measured on the C6-5.....


-Kerry
 
Last edited:

dragon_rider10

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2009
Messages
699
Reaction score
0
Very interesting ideas Kerry, thank you. Not sure what a Forrest Mim is but sounds they know their payloads. I was thinking of something similar to your cork idea with clear gel and ball bearings.
 

dragon_rider10

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2009
Messages
699
Reaction score
0
And I thought "forrest mim" was some sort of British euphemism for environmentalist! :roll:
 

dragon_rider10

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2009
Messages
699
Reaction score
0
We took the conservative approach our first launch. Sticks, acrons, twigs and moss. Nature in a rocket.

Flew well, but the nose cone separated from the payload section- scattering the nature all about. I think it wise that we did not launch a favorite toy....:y:

 

NjCo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2009
Messages
279
Reaction score
0
We took the conservative approach our first launch. Sticks, acrons, twigs and moss. Nature in a rocket.

Flew well, but the nose cone separated from the payload section- scattering the nature all about.

Hmmmm, that gives me an idea. Maybe I could fertilize my grass with my rockets. Or plant my garden! :) Nothing like combining chores with rockets!
 

dedleytedley

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2009
Messages
292
Reaction score
0
I don't have any actual payload rockets but I've launched a parachutist toy from my LHS on top of the chute in my BT-80 based rockets. My kids loved it until they thrashed the toy playing with it. Next time I'm at the hobby store I'll pick up two of them and load them together. The kids can have a contest with them. Ted
 

Pippen

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
1,969
Reaction score
3
Flew well, but the nose cone separated from the payload section- scattering the nature all about. I think it wise that we did not launch a favorite toy....:y:

Great pic, dragon-rider! She looks happy!

Smart dad. By the time we got to payloads my boys had seen enough rockets not recovered that they weren't keen on launching anything they were to attached to. I do have a little Curious George that I've been wanting to send into space but the kid who made the rocket with a large enough payload bay isn't taking stuffed passengers. ;)
 

dragon_rider10

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2009
Messages
699
Reaction score
0
I'm quite proud of my little rocketeer. That Nova had a lot of construction help from her. We consider it 'her' rocket. I helped her separate the fins from the stock, and she sanded them all herself, (I rounded the edges). She used the fin alignment wrap and marked the tube, she assembled the compound fins, she glued the fins and lug on, she assembled the payload section and nosecone. She picked the colors. I tried to have her paint it, but spray paint is a bit much for a 5 year old to tackle, i learned. (she was actually doing OK spraying the nosecone until i dropped it in the grass).

Everything was going great until krylon went crazy and attacked itself. I sanded the finish back as best as I could, but an up close inspection is telling. Regardless, she loves it and we'll be flying it this weekend.

 

Pippen

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
1,969
Reaction score
3
She's a cutie. :)

I have better luck with kids painting when they use one of those plastic attachments on the spray can. It's a lot easier for them to squeeze the trigger with their whole hand than it is to hold down the button. I use dowel rods--tape the nosecone onto a smallish diameter dowel and then a larger one that won't slide through the motor mount for the body tube. For younger kids when they first start out I just have them hold the can in one place and I (or an older sibling) moves the rocket in and out of the mist.

Everything was going great until krylon went crazy and attacked itself.
Perfect time to get out the GLITTER:D!
 
Top