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Panoramic video software?

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Peartree

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The thread on keychain video cameras got me to thinking (not a good thing). I have downloaded software that allowed me to stitch together panoramic vacation pictures into one big photo. I realize it would take considerable processing power/time but is there such a thing that will do the same for video (frame by frame)? Since the cameras are getting so small, wouldn't it be cool to build cameras into four (or more) fin pods and then stitch them together into one (look down or look up) video?

Can this be done?
 

ONAWHIM

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John,
Interesting idea.

Without knowing if there is a product and without doing a search I would offer this.

The panorama would need to be either in the video capture (acquisition) or the editing (post production), or both.

In acquisition the camera would need a lens to pick up the correct field of view. For 180 degrees that would be a super wide angle or fisheye

Alternately a parabolic mirror could be used with the camera aimed at its center. Think of a conical mirror with the point down and the camera underneath pointing up.
With either the image would be somewhat circular with unused image in the display or display window corners.

Post production is possible but the costs would be crazy. Video cards, software and licenses, hard drives, processing power. Pinnacle and Avid come to mind. I believe they are one company now.

Big bucks in my mind.

I don't real offer anything here. Someone else may know of a solution.

I'll go back to my coffee now.




Best regards,
Wm.
 

n5wd

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Wm's on the right track, but I think it's even simpler than that: a panoramic photograph is produced by expanding the horizontal plane of the image with wider sheets of paper (or, in most cases, an image that's printed on a longer strip of the continuous roll of paper).

How would you expand the television image except by letterboxing the top and bottom of the frame?

If that's the case, put a fish-eye lens on the video camera, and mask off, either in post-production editing software like Premier, or physically with a piece of cardboard, the top and bottom of the screen, and you've got a panoramic view. That's basically the way Mamiya decided to do panoramics on the RB-67 system (a 6x7 cm camera system used by a lot of pro's back when film was still king of the pile), and as the images on my wall and in the storage boxes show, it works like a champ.

I can easily put together a 30" wide by 10" tall frame for my printed panoramic photograph, but I can't do the same for a video image.
 

ONAWHIM

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I agree with n5wd.
The aspect ratio of a panoramic image would leave the top and bottom of a typical display letterboxed.
Even on a wide aspect flat panel monitor or laptop display.

The exception I guess would be a video window on a computer desktop sized for the pana-video only.

For conference room videoconferencing and collaboration there is a 360 product that lets the far end of a call see everyone seated around a table, the far end's viewpoint being from the center of the table.

Microsoft Roundtable

I am not a fan of spec'ing this product but some of my clients have asked about it.

If you were to look at the link you would see the 360 image.




Wm.
 
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Peartree

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I see what you are saying and I apologize, because most of your answers aren't really what I was asking and its my fault. From your answers, I see that "panorama" isn't really the word that I wanted. What I'm thinking, is this: the software I downloaded (free) last summer allowed me to create a panorama from a series of .jpg photos by stitching them together. The same software ill allow detailed images (a cityscape) to be created by stitching together ten, twenty or a hundred small detailled photos into one big photo.

Along this line of thinking I came to this: What if a four (or five) fin rocket was built, not to carry one camera, but a camera pod at the end or each fin tip. With each camera pointed down (or up) they get almost the same view but by sewing the images together where they overlap, the view would look like a launch without much (or any) of the rocket in the field of view. The only trace of the rocket would be the fire and smoke from the motor.

It would be as if you had a view through the center of the motor. :)

The software exists for photos, but can it be done for video?
 

n5wd

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...the software I downloaded (free) last summer allowed me to create a panorama from a series of .jpg photos by stitching them together. The same software ill allow detailed images (a cityscape) to be created by stitching together ten, twenty or a hundred small detailled photos into one big photo....What if a four (or five) fin rocket was built, not to carry one camera, but a camera pod at the end or each fin tip. With each camera pointed down (or up) they get almost the same view but by sewing the images together where they overlap,...The software exists for photos, but can it be done for video?
Yes, theoretically, it could be done, but I've never seen nor heard of any software out there that does that. That's not saying it doesn't exist, because I'm sure there's been some application that did exactly that - just that I've not run across it (and having taught digital media for the last eight years, I think I'm reasonably familiar with most of the commercial offerings out there)

It would be as if you had a view through the center of the motor.
No, it wouldn't. The camera on the right pod would show a view that had the centerline of the rocket on the left side of the image, and then more of the view towards the right. The left pod would have the centerline view on the right side of the frame, with more of the view towards the left.

And if you were to project it on a curved screen, you'd see the centerline view right in front of you, but as you looked left and right you'd see more of that side's view (much like the view people flying an aircraft simulator have with their multple views. But that isn't projected on a normal 16:9 aspect ratio TV, fer sure.
 
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ONAWHIM

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John
I don't know of any software to create that which you describe.

Interesting though.





Wm.
 

luke strawwalker

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Sounds similar to the old Panoramic movie dome they had at Astroworld years ago... It was REALLY cool (literally and figuratively-- they kept the air conditioning in there at like 60 degrees-- NICE on a hot humid Houston afternoon!)

You went in and laid down or sat on the floor, there were no seats. The "screen" was a hemispherical dome above you. It was ringed by like 6 projectors, each projecting film which was taken from a special camera setup using a ring of 6 cameras mounted in a fixed housing. The film started with someone walking along with this setup on a dolly in front of them, giving you the perspective of walking along with them through town. Then it switched to mounted on top of a car, so you were 'riding on the roof' and it was neat because you could look any which way around you and see anything as if you were driving by it in the car. Then they switched to the last 3/4 of the movie, which had the camera rig slung under a helicopter as it flew under a bridge, over water, circled and hovered and did aerial tricks and stuff... the view was exactly what you'd see if you were riding in a lawn chair slung ten feet beneath a helicopter, and because of the peripheral vision effects, you actually felt as if you were taking G-forces as the helicopter banked and turned sharply-- it felt like the floor was moving and the image on the screen was standing still. I recall some kids even got airsick from it and ran outside. It was WAY kewl though. Crappy Six Flags ripped it out a couple years after they bought Astroworld (which itself is long gone now).

I see the setup you're contemplating. I think the cameras would need to be mounted in the nosecone of the rocket, looking out and down at like a 45 degree angle (or whatever depending on the camera's field of view-- the FOV's would have to overlap the bottom of the rocket SLIGHTLY but not like most rocket vids where the fins are nearly in the middle of the screen! They would need to be just barely visible at the very bottom edge of the 'screen', and of course you'd have to know the camera's field of view to the sides and divide that by 360 so the camera's FOV's just overlap or abut (as little as possible to minimize processing power required to stitch the images together). You'd get a "360 degree" "planetarium" view of the ground and surroundings as the rocket ascended, which would look like you were looking down from the camera's position from just ahead of the rocket without the nosecone on ascent, much like most flying video games where you're 'behind' the plane 'flying' it, but in this case "in front of" the rocket, looking back as it "flies towards you" as you "ride in front of it" and the ground drops away.

Now, I'm not sure how perspective effects would work with this, because usually these sort of camera setups are filming with a lot of the motion being primarily fore/aft, side/side, and NOT up/down in relation to the axis of the camera setup. Of course putting this setup on a rocket, with the camera mounts' axis of symmetry aligned with the rocket's flight axis would result in mostly an up/down motion in the video, which might be more prone to distortion effects from perspective. Mounting the camera mounts axis of symmetry at a right angle to the rocket's flight axis would of course minimize this, but it would also result in the view changing to a 'pilot's view' similar to what a shuttle commander might see out his windows-- a view straight ahead, out each side window toward the horizon, but with the added view aft toward the ground, much like a fighter pilot in a straight up climb might see behind him. Of course that would also restrict the "side views" which would no longer be in the 360 degree view axis, and the straight up view would be boring (unless you were flying toward something!) but it would minimize any such perspective distortions in the final footage.

As for software to integrate it all together into a seamless 360 degree movie, that's TOTALLY another issue. I'd tend to think the software would have to create a 'panorama' from each matching frame from each of the cameras, frame by frame, then play them to create the panorama movie. Sounds like a LOT of computing power and memory! The setup I referred to earlier used simple film cameras in a housing which was constructed with a certain geometry with the cameras mounted together LOOKING OUT, which was then duplicated in reverse by placing the projectors in a ring around the wall mirroring the geometry of the cameras, PROJECTING INWARD and onto the hemispherical dome. Display of such a video on a flat screen would give a VERY weird perspective, as it would be a "flat" representation of a "spherical" view, much like a Mercator projection map of the Earth... Not exactly the immersive experience one would hope for....

OK I just thought of a way to do this "on the cheap"... and the display would even work right too... install six gum cams or fob cams in the "hex housing" and put it on top of the rocket. Borrow five more laptops (and use your own as the sixth) and load each of the six cams videos individually into each of the six different laptops, arranged in the same way around you as the cameras were arranged in the housing. Arrange the six laptops in a circle around you and play the vid on all of them at the same time... :y:

That's the only way I can think of to get the '360 degree view' on the screens as it was meant to be seen with video equipment rather than film projectors... nobody makes a spherical screen you could put over your head. Maybe virtual reality would work, but again, it would take MAJOR computing power to be able to 'look around' in realtime in the 360 degree view you'd have, because VR works by calculating where you're looking and then displaying the appropriate view onto the VR glasses/viewscreen.

Don't see how you could do it realistically without access to a military combat simulator... (Hmmm.... that could work).

Later! OL JR :)
 

Team Tracy

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Interesting idea.

You can rotoscope video clips in Photoshop. I've done that to a limited degree, where I've needed to retouch out objects in the background of a video clip.

I wonder if within photoshop you could stitch side by side clips together frame by frame and then export it again as a .mov file.

Hmm...
 
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