Paint removal

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Patch

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Is there something to use besides sand paper for removing paint from a plastic nose cone. I screwed up(as usual).:bang:
 

gpoehlein

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From a plastic nose cone, you can use spray oven cleaner. Spray the foam on (in a ventilated area), let sit for 10 minutes or so and clean off with soapy water and an old toothbrush. If it doesn't take it all off, you can do a second application and let it sit a bit longer. The oven cleaner won't attack the plastic but will soften the paint. If you have a lot of layers you might need several applications as well. (this is an old trick I learned back in my IPMS membership days)
 

Patch

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Thanks, I just knew there was something that would make it easier.
 

jdud

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I keep a plastic container full of brake fluid handy. Throw it in, let it sit for a few hours, and it comes right off with the help of a toothbrush. I learned this trick from the model car forum.
 
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Is there something to use besides sand paper for removing paint from a plastic nose cone. I screwed up(as usual).:bang:
There are several vandelism remover spary-on and brush on materials that do a pretty good job of softening most rattlecan spray paints without melting the underling styrene cones. sometimes you have to scratch the surface with a wire brush to give the material a penetrating point but the couple i've tried do seem to work....along with a little elbow greese;)

Don't have any left but one was the orange smelling stuff the other I got from Wal-Mart was something like Grif-off or something like that.
 

gpoehlein

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I keep a plastic container full of brake fluid handy. Throw it in, let it sit for a few hours, and it comes right off with the help of a toothbrush. I learned this trick from the model car forum.
I prefer the oven cleaner because, depending on the plastic involved, there is a chance that brake fluid could dissolve the plastic as well as the paint. The oven cleaner is a bit safer in my estimation (YMMV)
 
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I prefer the oven cleaner because, depending on the plastic involved, there is a chance that brake fluid could dissolve the plastic as well as the paint. The oven cleaner is a bit safer in my estimation (YMMV)
Good grief Greg:
I wouldn't call oven cleaner "a bit safer" in any estimation. the caustics in that stuff are awful.
at least the vandalism removers are forumlated to remove spray paints without harming underlying paints or other finishes....and skin! LOL!!!
 

gpoehlein

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Good grief Greg:
I wouldn't call oven cleaner "a bit safer" in any estimation. the caustics in that stuff are awful.
at least the vandalism removers are forumlated to remove spray paints without harming underlying paints or other finishes....and skin! LOL!!!
I meant safer to the plastic nose cone - I DID say to use in a well ventilated area in my first message. :p Rubber gloves are a definite must when using oven cleaner either to clean the oven OR remove paint!
 

JAL3

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Don't have any left but one was the orange smelling stuff the other I got from Wal-Mart was something like Grif-off or something like that.
Could you be think of Goo Gone?

I like it for cleaning reload casings.

goo gone.jpg
 

accooper

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John if you use oven cleaner, MAKE SURE YOU WEAR GLOVES! Take it from me you can get caustic burns from that stuff. But it does work great on removing paint from plastic nose cones!

Andrew
 

MrEd

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What about automotive paints on fiberglass tubes? Do you think oven cleaner will work here too?
 

kramer714

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automotive paints on fiberglass is tough to remove, I work with this stuff as part of the 'day job'.

A better mechanical way of stripping the paint and prepping the surface is to sand blast off the paint using corn-cob, walnut shells, soda, or starch medium. It will take off the paint and leave the fiberglass looking etched. Remember, if you use any hard grit, you can damage the fiberglass. You can get all of these at McMaster. The corn cob or walnut shells work well.
 

MrEd

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Thanks. I've seen soda blasters at Harbor Freight for less than $100. Using this to reuse fiberglass seems to be far cheaper than buying new tube.
 

kramer714

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Harbor Freight has low cost pressure pots too. I haven't used soda as much as corn. The corn can be tough to use with a siphon blaster, works well with a pressure pot PROVIDED you have dry air. If the air is wet, you get 'grits'.
 

aerospike

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Try a product called 'elo" (easy lift-off), it works great.
 

Scode68

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Pine-Sol usually takes paint off with a good over night soak. Just make sure you wash the plastic off with a good soap like Dawn or you will have problems with the new paint sticking.

Been using this on old plastic models for year and it does not effect the plastic.
 
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MysticalRockets

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There are several vandelism remover spary-on and brush on materials that do a pretty good job of softening most rattlecan spray paints without melting the underling styrene cones. sometimes you have to scratch the surface with a wire brush to give the material a penetrating point but the couple i've tried do seem to work....along with a little elbow greese;)

Don't have any left but one was the orange smelling stuff the other I got from Wal-Mart was something like Grif-off or something like that.

I paint small plastic and metal miniatures as my other hobby, and I use a product from Wal-Mart called "Krud Kutter Graffiti Remover". Works pretty well on just about any surface. it comes in a spray bottle, but with the miniatures, I just soak them in it.

Supposedly, Soylent Green works well too.
 
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