Orbital rockets are now easy, page 2: solid-rockets for cube-sats.

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RGClark

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[FONT=&quot]I suggested in a post to my blog that solid rocket motors available to amateurs working in high power rocketry can be used as the basis for constructing orbital rockets that are within the capabilities of most universities to build:

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[FONT=&quot]Orbital rockets are now easy, page 2: solid-rockets for cube-sats.
https://exoscientist.blogspot.com/2017/08/orbital-rockets-are-now-easy-page-2.html

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[FONT=&quot] Comments on its feasibility are welcome, especially using simulations such as OpenRocket.

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[FONT=&quot] Bob Clark[/FONT]
 

dhbarr

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It's just an 150mm o8000 with the weight trimmed by magical COPV for the top of three stages, then Tsiolkovsky for the rest. Yes, theoretically possible.

No, not easy.
 

RocketPro

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This would be within the capabilities of a group of universities, but perhaps too much for just one. Of course, once it's done (after $$$NRE) it could be replicated very straightforwardly. You know that Vector Space Systems is doing this at a slightly larger scale and they've already spent nearly $25M and are just now poised for their first orbital flight.

Would like to see a proposed Master Equipment List (MEL) for this configuration to determine if you've got everything you need. Unguided to orbit is a real trick, so you're probably going to need some sort of RCS or TVC to fly the proper trajectory (along with an IMU, computer, and some G&NC software, oh, and batteries!). You'll also need a flight termination system to get approval to launch and that'll add more dry mass and complexity. Also will need a few radios...but perhaps you can put them in the payload and dual use them.
 
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