OMG !!

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hornet driver

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I just did my first Cowboy chop---it's like a bone in ribeye--OMG-- and I didn't have a grill--seered it and put it in the oven at 450 for 30 min, that's about medium---Holly giant steak Batman-- two steak dinners and steak sammys for lunch---get'em at Sams!--20170114_143434.jpg20170114_191214.jpg--the ticket is to let them warm up to room temp before you cook-- they are like 3-4 inches thick!! don't know why the pics are upside down--hmmm--- well you get the point !---H
 

manixFan

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Looks great. Letting the meat warm up really seems to make a difference. I grill all my steaks but I'd like to try your method one of these days.


Tony
 

Screaminhelo

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I just did my first Cowboy chop---it's like a bone in ribeye--OMG-- and I didn't have a grill--seered it and put it in the oven at 450 for 30 min, that's about medium---Holly giant steak Batman-- two steak dinners and steak sammys for lunch---get'em at Sams--
--the ticket is to let them warm up to room temp before you cook-- they are like 3-4 inches thick!! don't know why the pics are upside down--hmmm--- well you get the point !---H
This is the first that I have heard of this cut (O.K. searched and found it is the same as bone in ribeye but I have never had one that is a 2lb slab) but the thought of a bone in ribeye that is 4" thick makes my mouth water.

My theory about letting the meat warm to room temp is that it cooks more evenly. In my mind, I am also better able to hit that perfect medium rare when the meat is not cold.
 
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RocketFeller

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The fear of normally occurring bacteria is out of hand in the USA. They are finding that increasing prevalence of asthma, allergies, and other auto-immune disorders are linked to an overly clean/sterile environment, especially at a young age. Letting a steak come up to temperature before cooking is not going to make you sick.

I leave out my lunch (sandwich with meat, cheese, greens, mayo) as I don't like to eat a cold sandwich, never been a problem for me or my son. Omnipresent food refrigeration is the exception worldwide, not the norm...
 

rstaff3

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You certainly can leave meat out too long, but we thaw ours to room temp when I am not too impatient.
 

T-Rex

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We need a "like" or "thanks" button.... Thanks for sharing HD! Makes me want to renew my Sam's membership. Though looking at the price, I am not sure I want to try one. I might like it!
 

manixFan

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Ha! I love this one:

"Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard."

My wife leaves things out on the counter until they cool to warm or room temp because she hates putting hot food into the refrigerator. We're both still here after 25 years of marriage.

When grilling meat it generally takes about 15 minutes to a max of about 30 minutes for something like a Tri-Tip to warm up, which is a pretty big piece of meat. Any bugs that could grow in that time would be on the surface which are likely killed by the grill.


Life is too short to follow all the rules, especially for a good piece of meat.


Tony
 

ThirstyBarbarian

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I totally agree with letting meat come to room temperature before cooking. It will cook much more evenly. When I grill steaks, I pat them dry, put a generous amount of coarse sea salt on both sides, and let them sit out until they come to room temp. They sweat out a small amount of moisture. Then pat dry again, season both sides, and grill. Somehow the salting alters the surface and you get much better browning. And the room temp lets you get a good medium or medium rare throughout, instead of overdone outside and a raw, bloody middle.

I like ribeye, but I've never seen this monster cowboy thing. Is that what Fred Flintstone tossed on his car and knocked it over? When I was in Italy a few years ago, I wanted a Tuscan Steak. You pay by the weight, and the smallest was over a kilo, about 2.5 pounds! My wife and I split it and had leftovers the next day. It's like a 3" thick t-bone. They don't ask how you want it cooked. It comes pretty rare, and I'm pretty sure it's just seasoned with salt, and then some olive oil after it's cooked. It was great!
 

ThirstyBarbarian

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Obviously you don't want meat sitting around at room temp for very long, but letting something come to room temp before cooking is not a problem, as long as you cook it right away. It only takes a half hour to warm up. Sometimes, if I'm in a hurry, I'll put whatever it is in a sealed ziplock bag and toss it in a bowl of lukewarm water to speed it up.
 

michigander

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OMG looks good ,but too rich for my table , beef stays in the store
 

Onebadhawk

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Ohhh mannn does that pic look wonderful...
I wish I saw this an hour ago,,
I'd have gone out to Costco and gotten some...

Teddy
 

BABAR

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Obviously you don't want meat sitting around at room temp for very long, but letting something come to room temp before cooking is not a problem, as long as you cook it right away. It only takes a half hour to warm up. Sometimes, if I'm in a hurry, I'll put whatever it is in a sealed ziplock bag and toss it in a bowl of lukewarm water to speed it up.
steaks/chops are different from ground beef in regards to bacteria. In ground beef, the grinding process allows bacteria (which are almost always present in small numbers) to get throughout the meat. Thus if you don't cook to sufficient temperature throughout the meat, including the center, you won't kill them, and if there are enough of them, obviously a problem. With steaks/chops, bacteria present are generally on the OUTSIDE of the meat, pretty hard for them to get into the central areas unless meat has been thawed for a significant period. So cooking generally gets knocks them down sufficiently even if the center is still pink.
This is why you frequently hear about recalled hamburger, but not very common to hear recalls of steaks or chops.

Chicken is a whole different story due to salmonella, so poultry always should be cooked thoroughly.
 

Fred Garvin

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Bone-in ribeye is my favorite steak and what I'll order if available. My local Kroger is one of the signature stores and actually has a butcher shop....they'll cut whatever you ask, and I get my bone-in ribeyes custom cut. Always let the steak come up to room temp before cooking.

The sear then oven finish method is what most steak houses use. Real steak houses, not a place that has steak plus many other items. The big difference that you taste compared to what you make at home is the aged meat. Good steakhouses have aging rooms for their meat. BIG difference from fresh bought at the supermarket. You can buy aged steaks from places like Omaha Steaks and others, but they're expensive. Don't try to age one at home.

Also call them "tomahawks"........
 
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