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OMG so tasty...any smokers here (food-type!)?

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soopirV

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Know this is completely irrelevant to Rocketry, but I'm sure there are others here who smoke food too. I just got started with cold smoking using an a-maze-n pellet sawdust smoker because it can be used for hot or cold smoke (https://www.amazenproducts.com/), and just tried a bite of a German-style ham I've made for our big Christmas Eve dinner of choucroute garnie. WOW!! SO FREAKIN' TASTY!! I brine/cured a pork loin in Morton Tender Quick, some onion, some juniper berries, corriander and some thyme for 2 weeks. I rinsed it (here's where I goofed, note for next time, see below), and then let it air-dry in my fermentation fridge set to 38°C for 24 hours to develop a nice tacky pellicle for the smoke to stick to, and then cold smoked it for 12 hours with alder sawdust in my new smoker. Tradition calls for juniper wood, at least some of it, but I don't have access to any here in the desert southwest (...I bet there's some on Mt. Lemmon...note to self). Lastly, I roasted it in a 225°F oven for about 2 hours, until it was 150°F in the center.

So what was my goof? Those of you who have done this can already tell, I bet! My first bite darn near sucked all the moisture out of my body...SO SALTY!!! The quick rinse and pat-dry might be fine for something brined over night, but I thought I'd ruined the piece entirely. Thankfully, a 10 minute soak of the sliced product in some fresh water makes it edible (and seriously, it is GOOD!). Next time (my kids are already asking for some for their lunches, so I need to get started!) I will soak in water after the brine for 12 hours, based on advice from a bacon-making friend of mine. Anyone have contrary or additional advice? No pun intended, but I am so totally stoked about smoking now!

As an aside, I'm taking the long-road on this whole meal- I started making my sauerkraut before Thanksgiving (natural fermentation takes ~4 weeks), and will also make two different types of French sausage from scratch (one smoked, one emulsified kinda like a fancy hotdog or a skinny mortadella minus the pistachios), along with some quick-cured ribs. No, none of us are from France or Germany, but I travel there a lot and have fallen in love with the cuisine. Our (okay, MY) "tradition" of Choucroute for Christmas eve started last year with store-bought sauerkraut and a few different types of Boars Head brand sausage (knockwurst and Kielbasa, mostly). Not very authentic! Definitely upping my game this year! And yes, my wife is amazingly patient and loving...so lucky!

Thanks for letting me "dish"! (I'll stop now)...
 

dixontj93060

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I use the Amazen smoke canister from time-to-time. Last weekend did a killer meat-lovers pizza in the main grill of my Traeger and had three blocks of cheese in the cold smoker. Yum!
 
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MikeT

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Thanks a interesting find. I may need to check it out.

Mike
 

MikeyDSlagle

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I use a basic Masterbuilt electric smoker. Upright with a window. I don't cold smoke, use a brine, nor finish in oven. I don't have the room to brine anything. I'll toss the turkey in at 5 AM and the ham at 7, around 11 they both done. Currently have maple chips, have used apple, mesquite, pecan and hickory. With pecan probably my favorite. I love smoked meats.
Smoke a butt for 4 or 5 hours then toss it in a bowl and tear at it with my Bear Paws. Yum yum. The Bear Paws are a necessity if you smoke a lot.
 

soopirV

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I use a basic Masterbuilt electric smoker. Upright with a window. I don't cold smoke, use a brine, nor finish in oven. I don't have the room to brine anything. I'll toss the turkey in at 5 AM and the ham at 7, around 11 they both done. Currently have maple chips, have used apple, mesquite, pecan and hickory. With pecan probably my favorite. I love smoked meats.
Smoke a butt for 4 or 5 hours then toss it in a bowl and tear at it with my Bear Paws. Yum yum. The Bear Paws are a necessity if you smoke a lot.
I'm still actively trying to understand which woods work best with which foods. I used alder on my pork because it apparently is close to beech (which wasn't available to me at the time), but plan to use pecan on the sausage that is smoked. I cold smoked a batch of raw almonds today, about 4hrs on what is billed as "pitmaster pellets" (blend of hickory, cherry and maple). I screwed up when I over-roasted them in the oven following the smoke treatment. Still good, but a little too roasty in some cases
 

RocketFeller

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I love smoked meats, pork most of all. This is tonight's dinner, pork shoulder for tacos. We are on our third Traeger grill. I grew up just a few miles from where they are (were) made. They still make the commercial models there, but the consumer models are now made in China.

ImageUploadedByRocketry Forum1482031175.455554.jpg
 

MikeyDSlagle

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I'm sorry sir, but if it is wrapped in foil then it is not truly smoked! LOL. Leave it out on a rack to where the smoke gets it all. One of my cousins wrapped up some ribs and tossed em on his smoker. May as well toss em in the oven.


soopirV

You are talking about using woods that would be a bit exotic to me to even think to smoke with. An older guy I once worked with once told me: "As long as it makes a nut or fruit you can smoke with it. The harder the wood the stronger the smoke flavor." Did he know what he was talking about? Not sure about the hardness of the wood but in my experience the nut/fruit statement rings true. Berries not included. I am not too sure about Juniper, seems too much on the soft side. But a little research and people do indeed use it. I've mixed pecan and apple before to smoke my turkey and ham. Quite tasty. Just to clarify: it's Puh-kahn not Pee-can. LOL Lately I have been getting it in my head to smoke some cheese, will have to see if my smoker goes that low.

If you ever cold smoke some cheese, send some my way!

https://www.deejayssmokepit.net/Downloads_files/SmokingFlavorChart.pdf

Mikey D
 

rms

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I'm sorry sir, but if it is wrapped in foil then it is not truly smoked! LOL. Leave it out on a rack to where the smoke gets it all. One of my cousins wrapped up some ribs and tossed em on his smoker. May as well toss em in the oven.


soopirV

You are talking about using woods that would be a bit exotic to me to even think to smoke with. An older guy I once worked with once told me: "As long as it makes a nut or fruit you can smoke with it. The harder the wood the stronger the smoke flavor." Did he know what he was talking about? Not sure about the hardness of the wood but in my experience the nut/fruit statement rings true. Berries not included. I am not too sure about Juniper, seems too much on the soft side. But a little research and people do indeed use it. I've mixed pecan and apple before to smoke my turkey and ham. Quite tasty. Just to clarify: it's Puh-kahn not Pee-can. LOL Lately I have been getting it in my head to smoke some cheese, will have to see if my smoker goes that low.

If you ever cold smoke some cheese, send some my way!

https://www.deejayssmokepit.net/Downloads_files/SmokingFlavorChart.pdf

Mikey D
Not exactly, foiling is actually quite common, it is used latter in the cook to get the internal temp past the 150-160 stall point where evaporation cools the meat as fast as it takes on heat in the low and slow cooking method. It is called a "Texas Crutch". Meat takes on smoke flavours for only the first couple hours of the cooking process anyway.

I have smoked a number of meat items and although pulled pork is always popular my families favorite is smoked Briske!

Greg
 

Exactimator

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I have a propane vertical smoker with a water pan. I use mostly apple wood for white meats and fish, and oak for beef. You can just throw a whole chicken on, smoke it for 4 hours and it tastes good. But I've found the more effort, prepping and brining really makes it great. I smoked a turkey for thanksgiving that was a several day process of ordering a fresh turkey, brining for 24 hours, then smoking. It turned out very well.

The dish I get the most requests for isn't meat but smoked mac and cheese. I actually won a mac and cheese contest at work, and ever since then for any potluck lunch we have, people ask me to bring it. You can Google recipes and there are a lot of videos on YouTube.

The key I've found is you need a really creamy, goopy cheesy recipe. Otherwise it just dries out. Kraft or Velveeta boxed dinners don't work. I brown some Jimmy Dean breakfast sausage, crumble and mix it in. Put it in a shallow baking dish and smoke it with apple wood until it's tan and has good smokey flavor. Good stuff.
 

MikeyDSlagle

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Not exactly, foiling is actually quite common, it is used latter in the cook to get the internal temp past the 150-160 stall point where evaporation cools the meat as fast as it takes on heat in the low and slow cooking method. It is called a "Texas Crutch". Meat takes on smoke flavours for only the first couple hours of the cooking process anyway.

I have smoked a number of meat items and although pulled pork is always popular my families favorite is smoked Briske!

Greg
Yes I am aware of the stall and the Texas Crutch. Maybe I should start spelling out JOKE before making comments so some folks will not call me out and insult my intelligence. Oh that was also a JOKE BTW.

We do not eat brisket in my house. We prefer meat that isn't like fatty tree bark. The last one I cooked was probably 12 years ago, granted I didn't know a whole lot about cooking back then, but still. I have yet to meet a brisket that is better than pulled pork. If you make one, then I take my hat off to you sir. IMO it is way overrated, and now extremely overpriced. I'll take a burger over brisket.

I agree brining helps immensely. I just don't have room in my fridge for such hthings, nor do I have room to brine one in a cooler. I can't leave the ice chest sitting on my floor in the kitchen. When my shop is built, maybe I will be able to do all that.
 

kenstarr

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I do a lot of summer sausage and snack sticks in the smoker. I've never done ham, mainly cause I have so much fun grinding, mixing, and stuffing sausage... Plus, the people I make it for just go nuts over it! I recommend Waltonsinc.com for supplies. They have recipes online as well. Butcher Packer has good stuff as well. H Summer sausage is the one I usually do with added high temperature cheese.
 

RocketFeller

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I'm sorry sir, but if it is wrapped in foil then it is not truly smoked! LOL. Leave it out on a rack to where the smoke gets it all. One of my cousins wrapped up some ribs and tossed em on his smoker. May as well toss em in the oven.


Mikey D
For pork shoulders/butts I will smoke for a few hours, cook at a medium temperature for a couple hours, then wrap tight in foil and cook a few more hours. It may be cheating, but it is the most reliable method I know of.
 

Onebadhawk

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For pork shoulders/butts I will smoke for a few hours, cook at a medium temperature for a couple hours, then wrap tight in foil and cook a few more hours. It may be cheating, but it is the most reliable method I know of.
1...
Me toooo...
I like a lot of smoke flavor,, I smoke over apple or oak and charcoal,, I have,, they're prevalent by me...
The longer in the smoke,,, the more moisture you loose...
That's a delicate balance...
By this method you control both exactly...

I have a batch of baby backs coming out of the smoker now...
I'll take a pic if I can hold myself back from digging in for a moment,, lol...

Teddy
 

DavidMcCann

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For pork shoulders/butts I will smoke for a few hours, cook at a medium temperature for a couple hours, then wrap tight in foil and cook a few more hours. It may be cheating, but it is the most reliable method I know of.
Same here. keeps it from drying out too. Once you get the smoke into the meat, worry about cooking it ;) I've never had anyone say "hey this moist, smokey, awesome piece of meat tastes like it was foiled" ;)
 

dhbarr

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Anybody ever try mulberry? It's crazy hard / dense, so I sometimes wonder about the flavor.
 

Onebadhawk

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20161218_170927.jpg

I hope this worked...

Years ago I read three new words while reading the rules and regs for bowhunting in my state...
I would like use these words in a sentence for you...

I am going to forward this pic to Tim Lehr for the specific purpose to harry, harass, or annoy him...

Teddy
 

Onebadhawk

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Same here. keeps it from drying out too. Once you get the smoke into the meat, worry about cooking it ;) I've never had anyone say "hey this moist, smokey, awesome piece of meat tastes like it was foiled" ;)
hahahahaaha..
I was wondering how long it would take for you to pick up on this thread....

Teddy
 

soopirV

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I'm sorry sir, but if it is wrapped in foil then it is not truly smoked! LOL. Leave it out on a rack to where the smoke gets it all. One of my cousins wrapped up some ribs and tossed em on his smoker. May as well toss em in the oven.


soopirV

You are talking about using woods that would be a bit exotic to me to even think to smoke with. An older guy I once worked with once told me: "As long as it makes a nut or fruit you can smoke with it. The harder the wood the stronger the smoke flavor." Did he know what he was talking about? Not sure about the hardness of the wood but in my experience the nut/fruit statement rings true. Berries not included. I am not too sure about Juniper, seems too much on the soft side. But a little research and people do indeed use it. I've mixed pecan and apple before to smoke my turkey and ham. Quite tasty. Just to clarify: it's Puh-kahn not Pee-can. LOL Lately I have been getting it in my head to smoke some cheese, will have to see if my smoker goes that low.

If you ever cold smoke some cheese, send some my way!

https://www.deejayssmokepit.net/Downloads_files/SmokingFlavorChart.pdf

Mikey D
Just cold smoked some extra sharp cheddar and a block of swiss...jury is still out, I've read that they need to rest a week for the flavor to blend and mellow. I'll let you know how they came out next Friday!
 
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Just cold smoked some extra sharp cheddar and a block of swiss...jury is still out, I've read that they need to rest a week for the flavor to blend and mellow. I'll let you know how they came out next Friday!
I will smoke about 10 pounds of cheddar at a time, seal them with a foodsaver, and place them in the fridge for 6-8 months. Its good eating!
 

evvo

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I've had charcoal smokers, then propane (Masterbuilt POS, it lasted 2 years and rusted out), now I have an electric Smokin'It 2 and love it.
It's stainless steel, double walled, insulated, and keeps a reasonably steady temperature. https://www.smokin-it.com/Smoker-p/smkmdl2.htm
 

iqsy59

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I must speak out for the brisket crowd. When selected, prepared, and smoked properly, I cannot imagine a more perfect food! The flat has almost no fat (which is why it is my choice for jerky), but the fat drizzling down from the point during smoking keeps it moist and full of flavor.

I still use the original charcoal "Webber Bullet" with lump charcoal and many different woods depending on the meat. I grew up with Oklahoma Style BBQ, which is mostly KC Style, but with some added Texas heat.

I must confess to not completely buying in to the Pork Butt craze. I live in South Carolina now and most that I have had either from renowned pits or local hobbiests seems a little devoid of flavor. I have found a couple of really good pits in North Carolina that are an exception however!

Cheers,
Michael



Yes I am aware of the stall and the Texas Crutch. Maybe I should start spelling out JOKE before making comments so some folks will not call me out and insult my intelligence. Oh that was also a JOKE BTW.

We do not eat brisket in my house. We prefer meat that isn't like fatty tree bark. The last one I cooked was probably 12 years ago, granted I didn't know a whole lot about cooking back then, but still. I have yet to meet a brisket that is better than pulled pork. If you make one, then I take my hat off to you sir. IMO it is way overrated, and now extremely overpriced. I'll take a burger over brisket.

I agree brining helps immensely. I just don't have room in my fridge for such hthings, nor do I have room to brine one in a cooler. I can't leave the ice chest sitting on my floor in the kitchen. When my shop is built, maybe I will be able to do all that.
 

dixontj93060

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That looks fabulous!

Interestingly I also put in service a new remote thermometer this afternoon. Results were also successful with a superb peppercorn beef tenderloin.
 

Onebadhawk

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Man that looks insane,,
Are those pork loin's ??
I always dry them out..
I guess if you're constantly basting them with bacon fat that oughta stop them from drying..

Comon Dave,,,
Cough it up...
What's the make and model of the new doohickey ????

Teddy
 

DavidMcCann

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Teddy-
thats a nine pound pork loin covered in Daves rib rub, then wrapped in a pound of bacon. The wind was killing me all day. Would up being 7 hours on the smoker, and I punched it through in the oven for a half hour at the end to get it to 165.

The widget is an iGrill2. Company was just bought out by Weber :). I've had my eye on it for about a year. Runs up to four probes. I've got two and was using one as an ambient monitor. I spent my day sitting in the living room playing with the kids and drinking beer, not running out to check temps and fire all day.
 

Onebadhawk

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Thank you Dave..
I just bought one with a pair of silicone gloves I've been wanting...

Teddy
 
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