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old Aerotech single use motors???

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r3tic

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I have a couple of old 24mm single use Aerotech motors and I was wondering if there was any chance of ignighting them succesfully? Any tips or pointers would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

DanFrank

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You should have no problems... How old are they? I had a couple of AT "G" motors from 1986-88 that I flew last year and they both worked as they should of. Sometimes the delay will be a little longer than advertised in old AP motors. Just use a "hot" igniter like a "dipped" copperhead or equiv.
Daniel
 

jj94

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They should be fine, but I would use a hot igniter. I doubt that a copperhead would be sufficient, as propellant like White Lightning tends to form a white layer of oxidation on the surface. Other propellants like Blue Thunder don't oxidize as much though. A First Fire Jr. should be good enough to light them.
 

jadebox

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I have a couple of old 24mm single use Aerotech motors and I was wondering if there was any chance of ignighting them succesfully? Any tips or pointers would be appreciated.
I've flown some Aerotech motors that old. I don't recall any problem igniting them. The problems you might encounter are:

1) The motors might be a hair too large in diameter. You might have to peel the label off to get them to fit in your rocket.

2) The ejection charge may have leaked out from under the paper cap. If so, you can refill the reservoir with BP and cover it with masking tape. (Or, you can use the motors in a tumble-recovery saucer.)

-- Roger
 

hardinlw

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I have some old G-80 Fast White Lightning motors. The ones I've flown recently have had problems with chuffing. This is likely due to the oxidation problem mentioned in a previous post and the suggested remedy was a hotter igniter. I believe the source of the problem is that the red caps on the nozzles had holes punched in them before shipping and once the plastic bag is punctured, moist air can get into the grains. I got a good price and bought about 50 of them. The first 30 or more performed as expected. After being away from the hobby for a few years, I've tried flying some of them and 3 out of 3 chuffed using the copperhead igniters shipped with them. Next time out I use a hotter igniter.
 

Daedalus

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Oxidation can cause the grain to swell and close up the slot. A friend of mine had some Econojets that were swolen to the point of not being able to get a copperhead into the slot. I opened the slot up for him with a combination of a piano wire poker and very small needle files until a copperhead would fit. The filing and prodding would have left a rough propellant surface and some dust in the motor - lit fast and first time for a perfect flight. If you try this be careful not to file the nozzle, only the grain - reopening the slot in reloads is so much easier ;)
 

Initiator001

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I flew a 1988 vintage AeroTech E28 motor during the NAR OOP Motor testing program last year.

It worked fine. :D
 

stickershock23

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I flew some reloads that were 13 years old. no problems!

On your 24mm motors take a piece of stiff wire about 1/8" diam ish.
stick it in the motor like it was an igniter, run it in and out a few time to "scratch" up the surface of the propellant a little bit, (to expose fresh propellant) tap the "dust" you made out of the motor,
and it should lite up like it was new.

Be smart use some common sense dont gouge the surface just scratch it up a bit.
 

ben_ullman

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I flew some reloads that were 13 years old. no problems!

On your 24mm motors take a piece of stiff wire about 1/8" diam ish.
stick it in the motor like it was an igniter, run it in and out a few time to "scratch" up the surface of the propellant a little bit, (to expose fresh propellant) tap the "dust" you made out of the motor,
and it should lite up like it was new.

Be smart use some common sense dont gouge the surface just scratch it up a bit.
I would leave the little bit of dust. Its only a little bit but it will help the motor not chuff and kick on instantly.

Ben
 

jj94

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I would leave the little bit of dust. Its only a little bit but it will help the motor not chuff and kick on instantly.

Ben
Won't the dust just end up falling out of the motor through the nozzle after the motor is vertical on the pad?
 

ben_ullman

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Won't the dust just end up falling out of the motor through the nozzle after the motor is vertical on the pad?
Its so little it might just "stick" there. I mean if its alot it will fall and a little will stick.

Ben
 
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