Oil Soaked Spot On Bare Nose Cone

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DHays

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So I discovered about a 3"x3" oil soaked spot on my 4" Wildman Drago VK filament wound fiberglass nose cone. It was stored away and a small bottle of oil leaked out and soaked the nose cone for about two months. I tried to clean it several times with alcohol, but I can still see the spot. I'm worried that it is going to show through the primer and paint. I didn't know if I should just get a new nose cone and go from there. It looks like the oil is soaked into the fibers of the bare nose cone. I was planning on using automotive primer and paint. Any ideas? Thank you!
 

gerbs4me

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When you touch the oil spot does it feel oily? You may cleaned it enough with alcohol on the surface. The spot you're seeing now could be under the surface. I'm thinking you'll be ok. I'd do a test run of primer, see how it goes.
 

Rob Campbell

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Try either K2R or Goof-Off. Both are effective removing model airplane residue from wood.
 

David Schwantz

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Do not try to paint over it, it will show through. K2R works, use it on oil soaked balsa wood. Also kitty liter or floor dry, but they take forever.
 

DHays

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Ok I was afraid of that. I might try the K2R or maybe just get a new cone.

Thank you!!!
 

DHays

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Gerbs4me, yes, it still feels a little oily when I touch it.
 

Troy3003

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Just keep cleaning it, maybe try some simple green, brake or carb cleaner or something similar. Don't let it soak of course, but after a few cleanings it should be good wash with dawn and then prime and let it set a few days to look for bleeding or bonding issues.
 

DHays

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Thank you so much everyone for the ideas!
 

MJW

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I've used diatomaceous earth to pull oil out of a concrete garage floor. It should work for this too. No harsh solvents needed.
 

rharshberger

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TSP (TriSodiumPhosphate) dissolved in hot water, scrub lightly, rinse and allow to dry fully. The TSP substitute DOES NOT work as well as the real stuff. Work outdoors if possible.
 

gerbs4me

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I've used diatomaceous earth to pull oil out of a concrete garage floor. It should work for this too. No harsh solvents needed.
I didn't know that stuff works for oil! Thanks for the info
 

G_T

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Try using a detergent like Dawn dishwashing liquid. Soak it for a while. Detergents break up oil into micro droplets that they can carry away. A detergent is not an oil solvent. It breaks the surface tension so the oil can be broken up. Anything which acts as an oil solvent will remove a lot of oil but also spread the remaining oil over a larger patch. So get what you can out with a detergent soak and intermittent agitation/scrubbing. I'd even go so far as to say do it for a couple days soaking.

Then let it thoroughly dry - which will take longer than you think - and then go to other solvents for the oil. Denatured alcohol is not that great a choice. But it is what you want to use as the last step, to remove remainder of whatever you used to get the oil off the surface.

Be careful of compatibility with cured epoxy.

If you use an oil based paint it might have better tolerance for remaining traces of oil. It is a completely different type of oil but it still might work better. Anything water based isn't going to be super happy. There are also primers and paints specifically designed to be used in oily environments.

Gerald
 

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