Off topic question re: refinishing a rifle stock

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rstaff3

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I finally have gotten around to thinking about getting ready to commence refinishing a rifle stock. I had left this rifle sitting on top of a soft, vinyl rifle case. Wherever it touched the case, the finish melted (best description I can come up with).

Since I have a good amount of acetone and MEK around for igniter making, I was wondering if one or both of these would strip the varnish, or should I but some stripper (not the 2-legged type ;) ). I know I could just try them, but I'd have to do more than just think about the task :eek:
 

ibeblip

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The stripper will do a better job with less work on your part. But BE CAREFUL, some of that stuff is very nasty.

Is it an antique?
 

Lee Reep

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Acetone and MEK are brutal! I'd be worried about not only the dangerous fumes, but volatility.

The commercial strippers you can get are not too bad if used outdoors -- just be sure to wear reall good gloves. My wife and I redid a several pieces of antique furniture when we were in college. We probably should have left the original finish on them, but we redid them with the furniture strippers you get at places like Home Depot, and they came out great. One product I've never found to be all that great is the Formsby'd Furniture Restorer. May have been me, but it seemed to just allow the finish to dissolve and get moved around, ending up with a huge mess.

Ironically, I was moving some rocket stuff around in my shop, and found the old Remington .22 rifle I bought last year. just like the one I had as a kid. It needs refinishing, too. I'm going to use Watco Danish Oil, and no varnish.

Good luck!
 

rstaff3

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Thanks for the responses. They confirmed what I suspected. I haven't stripped much paint in my day and its been a loooong time.

This is a 30 year old 22 that hadn't see the light of day in 20. It's a real simple job since there are no nooks and crannies to get to. I'll hit the Home Depot this week and see what I find. I'll also look into the Danish Oil.

Oh, and I picked up a cloch 'gun sock' so hopefully its better protected.

THEN, I hopefully will be able to take it back to Texas next time I drive and do some plinkin' Marlyand is a weird state. It costs a fortune to join a range.
 

ibeblip

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There you go man. The oil finish is a great idea.

But, pray tell, what is the make and model?
I'm dyin' to know.
 

rstaff3

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Just a cheap Remington 580 single shot. Bought it with grass-mowing money.
 

Lee Reep

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Forgot to mention ...

I've been using Watco Danish Oil for almost 30 years. Cannot vouch for other brands, but an antique store we frequented many years ago used it exclusively. We refished a 100 year old oak table back in the 70s, and it still looks great.

Watco also has (or had) spirit stains, which you have to be careful with, since they can really soak into the end grain on woods since they are so thin. I bought lots of colors in quart bottles, and haven't purchased any more for 20+ years. I'm assuming they are still available

Another great product is their Satin Wax, which you can use as a final finish to add a little water protection.
 

rstaff3

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Originally posted by Lee Reep
Forgot to mention ...

Watco also has (or had) spirit stains, which you have to be careful with, since they can really soak into the end grain on woods since they are so thin.
Excuse my ignorance....this is a bad thing?
 

Lee Reep

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Originally posted by rstaff3


Excuse my ignorance....this is a bad thing?
No apologies necessary. I should have better explained it. Lots of stains are thick, creamy, "wipe on and off" stains, such as MinWax. They are easy to use, but sometimes do not soak in evenly, or produce a dark enough stain. Watco stains are water-thin, and soak in well. But, on end grain, they can really soak in and produce very dark areas if you are not careful. The benefit to using them ids that they come in many colors, and can be mixed for custom colors.

However, for your rifle stock, I doubt you want or need to stain it, especially if already pretty dark, such as mahogany or walnut. Watco Oil can just be wiped on, allowed to dry, and reapplied as desired. The final application just needs to be wiped down with a soft rag, and allowed to dry. Optionally, apply the wax top finish if desired.
 

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