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Neil

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Today I went to my my dad's office's lawn... Got it done fast, and went to go to Home Depot for what not... Then we noticed a "Tool Sale!" sign across the street...

I suggested we go "look" at the jigsaws there:D

After a bit of consideration, we walked out with a Delta SS250 jigsaw!!!!:cool:

It took us an hour or so to set up. So we turned it on, and the WHOLE ROOM starts vibrating...:eek:

I think we might need to bolt it to the floor....:rolleyes: ;)

So how are you supposed to get a bolt into a concrete floor?:confused:

Any advice on this would be apreciated....:rolleyes: ;) :eek:
 

Ryan S.

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weird, I would bolt it to a table or something, that would make it easier to use too.

Mine doesnt vibrate that much at all, just kinda quietly goes up and down
 

rbeckey

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You use a special screw called a "Tapcon." They are sold with or near special drill bits that are the right size and construction for drilling concrete. Home Depot or Lowes should have them.
 

Neil

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The actual machine isnt moving at all.... Its the table thats moving... I wonder... Would epoxy work?:D ;) :eek:
 

Ryan S.

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fill the drawers with something or put some heavy stuff on the table
 

Hospital_Rocket

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!I had a suggestion that Micromister pointed out would probably not be the best idea.

If you read my idea, please consider MM's post. The tool I suggested is really for professionals. I regret making a suggestion that others do something that might hurt them.:(

Insert sheepish look smiley here....:(


John - Thanx for yanking my leash. Sometimes the I only open my mouth long enough to change feet!
 

Ryan S.

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I have used those, they are great fun. I have a couple of rounds around here somwhere

I was going to suggest it but I didnt know what they were called
 

Micromeister

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Yes you need to secure the machine to a bench, table or what have you, but before you do find a piece of old carpet a little larger than the footprint of your machine. mount our scroll saw through the carpet to whatever base you would like.
Note you DO NOT need to fasten to the floor. I bolted mine to the top of a two draw file cabinet. it doesn't move at all. We have several delta Scroll saws at work mounted on lockable wheels so they can be rolled from one shop to another quickly.

OBTW Hospital those 22cal power setters are one of the most dangerous tools available for mounting anything to anything. Sheeze I'd think someone who works around a hospital would have seen some of the carnage. they are all but banned from commerical job sites and most govenment contracts, because of the potential danger to the operator and other.
 

Stymye

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I have mine mounted to a sturdy workbench .with the mounting screws going thru pieces of rubber .I noticed that it still wants to vibrate at full speed so I hardly use it at that setting
 

Neil

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For me, at full speed it hardly wants to budge at full speed... It might be cause its going so friggin fast I can hardly feel the vibrations, though ;) (j/k. I really have no idea... ;))

Carpet, huh? OK... Ill have to try that... I have a big sturdy (and heavy) work bench my dad made, and I am using that to mount it on. Just any ol carpet, or what? It woulent matter, would it?
 

Neil

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Oh, wait... Now I get it.:eek:


OK. THat kinda carpet:eek: :eek: I get it now....:rolleyes:
 

Steve

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Originally posted by Micromister
those 22cal power setters are one of the most dangerous tools available for mounting anything to anything.
I just happen to be using a Remington power fastener on a project at the house... I haven't heard a thing about them being dangerous (if not mis-used) - could you enlighten me, or point me to a website with some info? Are they more dangerous than any other type of firearm?
I will find another solution if I have to, but for what I'm using it for - it sure comes in handy.

Thanks

S..
 

Stymye

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just go to osha .gov and look up powder actuated tool.

heres a snip:

Powder-Actuated Tools

Powder-actuated tools operate like a loaded gun and should be treated with the same respect and precautions. In fact, they are so dangerous that they must be operated only by specially trained employees.

Safety precautions to remember include the following:
These tools should not be used in an explosive or flammable atmosphere.

Before using the tool, the worker should inspect it to determine that it is clean, that all moving parts operate freely, and that the barrel is free from obstructions.

The tool should never be pointed at anybody.

The tool should not be loaded unless it is to be used immediately. A loaded tool should not be left unattended, especially where it would be available to unauthorized persons.

Hands should be kept clear of the barrel end. To prevent the tool from firing accidentally, two separate motions are required for firing: one to bring the tool into position, and another to pull the trigger. The tools must not be able to operate until they are pressed against the work surface with a force of at least 5 pounds greater than the total weight of the tool.
If a powder-actuated tool misfires, the employee should wait at least 30 seconds, then try firing it again. If it still will not fire, the user should wait another 30 seconds so that the faulty cartridge is less likely to explode, than carefully remove the load. The bad cartridge should be put in water.

Suitable eye and face protection are essential when using a powder-actuated tool.

The muzzle end of the tool must have a protective shield or guard centered perpendicularly on the barrel to confine any flying fragments or particles that might otherwise create a hazard when the tool is fired. The tool must be designed so that it will not fire unless it has this kind of safety device.

All powder-actuated tools must be designed for varying powder charges so that the user can select a powder level necessary to do the work without excessive force.

If the tool develops a defect during use it should be tagged and taken out of service immediately until it is properly repaired.
 

Steve

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Originally posted by stymye
just go to osha .gov and look up powder actuated tool
Thanks, styme ---

I tried a few google searches, but I didn't use the right search string.

S..
 

edwardw

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The Ramset (brand name tool) tends to have quite a 'kick' to them. I have one and got certified to use it. When we pour a slab on grade and affix walls down with the Ramset I'm tired at the end of the day. The pressure you have to push with, coupled with the nice kick it gives you and the stress on your wrist all make it dangerous at the end of the day. I've seen them hit a hard spot or aggregate in concrete and the fastener will deflect. We usually shoot them in green concrete (not fully cured) or else it's just a tough job. But they do their job of holding. Personally I also like a hammer drill and some tap in concrete anchor bolts for holding stuff down, just takes a little longer.

Edward
 

loopy

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Originally posted by stymye


Hands should be kept clear of the barrel end.
Kinda reminds me of the movie Armed and Dangerous, where Meg Ryan is training security guards at a firing range, and says, "Remember, when the bullet leaves the gun, it will be going very, very fast!"...lol
 

Micromeister

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Originally posted by Bushrat
I just happen to be using a Remington power fastener on a project at the house... I haven't heard a thing about them being dangerous (if not mis-used) - could you enlighten me, or point me to a website with some info? Are they more dangerous than any other type of firearm?
I will find another solution if I have to, but for what I'm using it for - it sure comes in handy.

Thanks

S..
Sure Thing Bushrat:
I and the Company have used Remington & Ramset power setters. Now most construction sites in the metro DC/ Baltimore area do not allow there use or even be on the job sites. We along with most of the construction trade contractors in this area have have shelved or junked the systems.

In the last 4 or 5 years there have been many injuries and at least two deaths by BP powered fasteners setting tools. One a pedestrian passing a job site where the stud fastener turned out of the wooden stud/concrete joint traveled about 75 feet through a window opening hitting the passing person in the side of he head, killing him on the spot.
Many others have had the concrete nail do a 180 out of the target location ripping up the arm of the operator, or ricochee(sp) off on an angle hitting a co-worker.
Personally I'll sick with self-drilling concrete anchors or the good old hammerdrill with any number of different fasteners to do the job.
Please make sure no-one is anywhere near where you use the Remington power setting system... not even in the next room.. these projectiles have penetrated as many a 4 stud and drywall rooms!

Hope this helps
 

Neil

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Back to the real topic of this thread...:D ;)


Well, I have left the thing un-bolted to the table, and it is working fine for me now. Go figure. I might try to mount it sooner or later when I have time, but right now it doesent seem worth the trouble.:rolleyes:

Is this a decision that might kill me? :eek: ;)
 
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