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leegscott

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I have read a lot of bad things about the new formula of krylon. Has anyone had good results with it? I am considering giving it a try. I am assuming the trick will be not to get in a rush and put lots of light coats and wait 24 hours between coats.
 

tibadoe

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I have read a lot of bad things about the new formula of krylon. Has anyone had good results with it?.............
Only used it a couple of times but worked fine, no problems. :)
 

AKPilot

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No problems here. I followed the new instructions and it worked like a champ.
 

MarkII

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The thing to keep in mind about the new Krylon is that it is not as "hot" as the old formulation, meaning that the solvent carrier for it doesn't flash dry the instant it hits the material like the old stuff did. So you need to adjust your spray can application technique accordingly. One of the biggest differences is that the new staff lays down and spreads out a bit as it hits the object, so you have to go much lighter with the coats. If you apply it in the same manner as you do with the the old stuff, you will get runs almost every time. I don't know if this next factor is due to the new nozzle or if it has something to do with the formulation, but when you spray, it produces a "cloud" or "fog" of paint over the piece, rather than shooting out in a more direct and tighter spray pattern. So with these two items in mind, here is what I do.

First, I make sure that the can is well-shaken. I keep shaking for a full two minutes (timing it with my watch) after the ball starts rattling. Then I hold the can a bit closer to the piece - 6 to 8 inches - versus the old distance of 8 to 10 inches. I sort of aim the spray just above the part that I'm painting, and use the cloud of paint from the nozzle to "dust" the piece, while turning it continuously. I stop when the piece has a light, semi-transparent, dusty-looking coat of paint. I keep rotating the piece for about a minute and a half or so, and then I repeat the process. I stop when the coat looks a bit less transparent, and continue to rotate the piece for another minute or so. I watch the piece as I am spraying it and afterward to insure that any one area doesn't look too "wet."

The whole idea is to keep the coats very light and thin. Don't worry if it doesn't look like you are getting complete coverage, even after a couple of sprayings. With old formula Krylon, you sprayed on a light initial coat or two, and then followed up with a heavier coat that gave you full coverage with the color. This method worked because the initial light layer tacked up so fast that it acted like an adhesive, which helped to hold the follow-up heavy coat together and keep it from running. But because the new formula isn't quite as volatile, you can't apply it that way anymore. With the new formula, you can't really ever put on any heavy coats. You have to just keep going with very light coats that you "fog" or "dust" onto the piece until you build up the coverage to opacity.

So after two or three such applications with the new formula, stop and let the paint the you have applied level out and start to tack up a bit by pausing for somewhere around 5 minutes. Keep rotating the piece slowly if you want. Then resume spraying, putting on a couple more applications. After that you should have a pretty good, opaque coat and so you can stop and let it dry. I usually apply a second coat AFTER 24 hours. I usually just need to do a couple of light applications to build up the second coat.

Just how many applications will be needed to achieve full opaque coverage does also depend on the shade of paint you are using, too. White seems to need the most applications, and black the fewest.

After another 24-48 hours of dry time, I'm ready to mask and apply another color. This is when the somewhat notorious recoat window comes into play. After I mask off the piece, I apply a light coat of the base color to seal the edge of the mask line. If any bleeding is to occur under the tape, the color of the bleed will be identical to the base color, so it won't be visible. Once that is done, it is time to apply the second color. New formula Krylon has a recoat window of within one hour or after 24 hours. This is actually quite a bit more expeditious than, say, Walmart Colorplace spray paint, which has a recoat window of within 2 hours or after one week. :eek: I don't know about anyone else, but if I miss the initial recoat time, I would much rather have to wait only one day, rather than seven days, before I paint some more. With new formula Krylon, I wait about 25-35 minutes and then apply the second color. Again, I fog the color on in light coats, but I make sure that I complete all of my application of that color within about 5 minutes. This means that I am completely done with putting on the second color around 40 minutes after I applied the first "mask sealer" color. I have never had any problem with paint wrinkling or crazing when I have stuck to this time frame.

You can then remove the paint mask at whatever interval you customarily use for other paints. In this last respect, new Krylon is no different than any other spray paint.

MarkII
 

NjCo

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My experience is very similar to MarkII. I haven't had any problems with the new Krylon. I generally do two or three light passes over the rocket with a couple minutes between each pass. Then I let it dry for at least 24 hours. Then I repeat the process. Usually after that 2nd paint session I have the desired final color. Then I wait 24 to 48 hours before doing any masking. And I only mask with low tack tape (blue painters tape regular and/or delicate surface or Tamiya).

Check out some of the picture I just posted over in this thread:

http://www.rocketryforum.com/showthread.php?t=6735

The V-2, Baby Bertha and Guardian were all done with new Krylon.
 

talkin Monkey

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I've had yellow Fusion craze over yellow Fusion. Pilot error mind you as I only waited 3~4 days to apply the second heavy coat after a bake-out in my truck.

However, even after sanding most of it off, it still crazed a bit on the fillets.

I will not buy ANY more Fusion...Hosing down rockets with rattle can spray paint should not be...ummm...er....rocket science IMO.
:2:

P.S. My mid-build...build, an Estes Mosquito, needs a 4th coat as well. Fusion also seems to be a bit (thin?).

[EDIT]...Maybe it was the fuzzy dice that screwed up the paint job?

Fin Masking.jpg


1st Coat Bake Out.jpg


Crazy Krylon.jpg
 
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blackjack2564

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I had the same thing happen with both the red and yellow new krylon. After the required 24 hrs[more like 36] the yellow wrinkled over the fin fillets and the red pulled into wrinkle at the base of the NC.

My only explanation is the "ideal" 24 hrs may be longer depending on where we live based on temp and humidity. This was 80-85 and 55-60 humidity where my incident occurred.

Had it been thoroughly cured, I'm sure there would not been a problem. If I use it again I will just wait several days.

It only wrinkled in several small areas, most likely where heavy build up was.

That being said ,I used Rustoleum on another project in the same time-frame [different colors ....blue metallic and florescent red...gloss clear] same conditions with no adverse reaction.

I used the new krylon same as old, technique wise. After reading this, maybe an adjustment in the application was needed.
 
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leegscott

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Thanks for the advise. I tell you guys trying to figure out what kind of paint to use for this project has been a real challange!! In the past we have used automotive or old Krylon. We have decided to try the new krylon (indoor / outdoor) not the fusion. We plan to keep to light coats and spend about two weeks at it. I am going to monitor temperature and humidity with guages I have in the shop. We will post pictures if anyone is interested! I am using Kilz for the primer and I am almost done with it. I noticed that knowone mentioned primer. What did you guys use?? Should I coat the Kiltz with Krylon Primer to keep everything the same. I know that with the old krylon, Kiltz worked fine.

Thanks
 

luke strawwalker

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I have read a lot of bad things about the new formula of krylon. Has anyone had good results with it? I am considering giving it a try. I am assuming the trick will be not to get in a rush and put lots of light coats and wait 24 hours between coats.
It's okay... it's just not as good as the walmart 99 cent a can colorplace paint yet its three times the price or so. THAT is what's SO disappointing.

It's a lot more 'unforgiving' of bad application conditions than most other paints, seems like. You can put on multiple coats, but do it WITHIN ONE HOUR OR AFTER 24 HOURS. If you're going to mask for multicolor paint jobs, I'd wait a few days for the paint to 'harden up' and cure.

If you're going to buy a 'mid grade' rattle can paint, there are better ones out there than new Krylon, IHMO. If you're going to buy cheap paint, there are cheaper ones out there that honestly are better... WM Coloplace being among them. If you're gonna go with 'cheap' paint, might as well save the money and get the 99 cent a can stuff.

All IMHO and YMMV... :) Good luck! OL JR :)
 

rokitflite

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I've had yellow Fusion craze over yellow Fusion. Pilot error mind you as I only waited 3~4 days to apply the second heavy coat after a bake-out in my truck.

However, even after sanding most of it off, it still crazed a bit on the fillets.

I will not buy ANY more Fusion...Hosing down rockets with rattle can spray paint should not be...ummm...er....rocket science IMO.
:2:

P.S. My mid-build...build, an Estes Mosquito, needs a 4th coat as well. Fusion also seems to be a bit (thin?).

[EDIT]...Maybe it was the fuzzy dice that screwed up the paint job?
I like the Fusion paint for the polyethylene nose cones... One thing I discovered though is that it was not at full bonding strength for over a month!
 

luke strawwalker

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(snip)

New formula Krylon has a recoat window of within one hour or after 24 hours. This is actually quite a bit more expeditious than, say, Walmart Colorplace spray paint, which has a recoat window of within 2 hours or after one week. :eek: I don't know about anyone else, but if I miss the initial recoat time, I would much rather have to wait only one day, rather than seven days, before I paint some more. With new formula Krylon, I wait about 25-35 minutes and then apply the second color.

MarkII
I've never had any problem with Colorplace paint doing topcoats after 24 hours... I think the "recoat after a week" stuff is more CYA than anything...

VERY good points about the new Krylon though...

Personally, I think about half the problem shooting new Krylon is that stupid 'new and improved' fan nozzle. The wider pattern means you have to get closer, and you have WAY more overspray, especially on items that are 'rocket shaped' (long/slender) and to get that fan pattern, it takes A LOT more material being puked out at a higher pressure, but the higher volume means it's not atomized as well, considering the pressure constraints of a rattle can. I'd MUCH prefer the 'old style' cone pattern nozzle that atomizes finer with a lower volume of paint and at a lower pressure. Yes it doesn't 'cover as well' but then I'm not painting a barn or a table, I'm painting a rocket, which is a much smaller target.

Unfortunately the new nozzles aren't interchangeable with old nozzles off other cans...

Later! OL JR :)
 

luke strawwalker

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Thanks for the advise. I tell you guys trying to figure out what kind of paint to use for this project has been a real challange!! In the past we have used automotive or old Krylon. We have decided to try the new krylon (indoor / outdoor) not the fusion. We plan to keep to light coats and spend about two weeks at it. I am going to monitor temperature and humidity with guages I have in the shop. We will post pictures if anyone is interested! I am using Kilz for the primer and I am almost done with it. I noticed that knowone mentioned primer. What did you guys use?? Should I coat the Kiltz with Krylon Primer to keep everything the same. I know that with the old krylon, Kiltz worked fine.

Thanks
I tell you, new Krylon is so persnickety I think I'd stick with just using New Krylon primer. You really don't want any adhesion problems or stuff like that. Now I HAVE shot NK over WM Colorplace primer, Rustoleum primer, and NK primer, but only in single-color rockets. If I were doing a two-tone rocket with NK, I'd stick to NK primer, but then again I'd probably choose a different brand paint!

To tell the truth, I've only used NK on a couple of projects. I really prefer the WM Colorplace. Their regular gray primer and more hi-solids red primer go on great, dry fast, sand well, and leave a terrific smooth primered surface for the base color coat, and it adheres and holds up well, seems very tolerant of whatever brand you shoot over it without problems, and it's cheap!

I've never tried Kilz but I've read as much bad as good about it. I've never had the need for it. I use thinned Elmer's filler brushed on, sanded off, and a little auto body red spot putty for spirals and minor imperfections if necessary, sanded down, primed, and sanded, and gotten terrific finishes.

It's all in whatever "system" you find most comfortable though... :) OL JR :)
 

RoyAtl

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The new Krylon is fine. It is just that it is a slow paint, and you have to work with it differently. We had been spoiled by the fast drying formula over the years. We developed our techniques, and depended on the drying time.

Because the new formula is "low VOC (volatile organic compounds)" what fumes it gives off stay around for a much longer time. Eventually your rocket will quit smelling of paint (and instead smell of burnt propellant!).
 

NjCo

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Unfortunately the new nozzles aren't interchangeable with old nozzles off other cans...

Later! OL JR :)
The new nozzles do swivel though. Just turn the nozzle so the spray pattern more closely matches the dimensions of your object and you'll get more of the paint on your rocket.
 

MarkII

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And I only mask with low tack tape (blue painters tape regular and/or delicate surface or Tamiya).
I use either Tamiya or Duck Brand Delicate Release tape (purple color) for masking.

Check out some of the picture I just posted over in this thread:

http://www.rocketryforum.com/showthread.php?t=6735

The V-2, Baby Bertha and Guardian were all done with new Krylon.
Nice paint jobs, despite the subsequent flight damage. Attached is a picture of my Goblin clone, painted with new formula Krylon. Another flier at NARAM complimented me on the paint job. That was a first for me. :)

MarkII

DSCF0755.jpg
 

luke strawwalker

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The new nozzles do swivel though. Just turn the nozzle so the spray pattern more closely matches the dimensions of your object and you'll get more of the paint on your rocket.

Yes, they swivel, but that doesn't help-- they produce a flat fan pattern, sorta simulating an automotive type spray gun. Turning the fan so that it's 'inline' with what you're painting will just end up concentrating the spray SO much that you will literally be HOSING the paint onto the rocket-- not a good thing with a nozzle that really puts out too much paint in too coarse a droplet anyway! You'd almost be promised runs!

Don't want to sound arrogant, but I know a bit about this stuff-- I've worked with spray painting stuff for 20 years on the farm and various types of pesticide spray nozzles, including flat fans, double flat fans, air induction type flat fans, even fan nozzles, and solid and hollow pattern cone nozzles for over 20 years on the farm spraying crops... :D

I know a sorry cheap nozzle operating at a suboptimal pressure and/or sized too big for the application when I see it... :) OL JR :)
 

MarkII

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The new nozzle that Krylon uses is the same one that Dupli-Color uses on its spray cans. (Krylon and Dupli-Color share the same parent company.) I kind of like it, actually; I think that it is much less prone to clogging. But I do know what you mean about the overspray, though. I don't turn the nozzle 90 degrees so that it is horizontal; instead I turn it 45 degrees. That seems to work for me. If anything, I think that the new nozzle (or is it the paint formulation?) produces a finer, more cloud-like spray than the old cans do. As you noted, the old can nozzle produces a tight, cone-shaped spray. I think that the old version of Krylon probably needed that spray pattern because the solvent paint carrier was so volatile. The nozzle needed to produce a very direct, tight spray pattern in order to get the paint onto the surface fast, before the solvent evaporated. I also think that if you replaced the nozzles on the new Krylon with the older style, they would deliver too much paint too fast. As I mentioned before, you really have to refrain from flooding the surface with paint when you use the new formulation.

Krylon's current primers appear to be the same as they have always been. They have no recoat window; you can recoat anytime with their primers. I never use Kilz primer; it is meant for color- and stain-blocking on interior surfaces. I work to make the bare surface smooth and defect-free before I start to paint, so I don't need to apply a thick coat of primer very often. When I do, though, I use Dupli-Color High Build primer. I have also used Plasti-Coat Sandable primer for that in the past, but now I stick with the DC, because I think that it is just a notch better.

I buy nearly all of my spray paint at Walmart. I often consider buying Walmart spray paint, but I almost always end up going with Krylon, because I like their colors better. I feel the same way about Rustoleum. I do buy RO for some colors, though. I am also getting ready to try some Valspar, too. That brand also has some pretty neat colors. These discussions about spray paint seem to come up quite often, yet no one ever seems to mention using it.

MarkII
 

luke strawwalker

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The new nozzle that Krylon uses is the same one that Dupli-Color uses on its spray cans. (Krylon and Dupli-Color share the same parent company.) I kind of like it, actually; I think that it is much less prone to clogging. But I do know what you mean about the overspray, though. I don't turn the nozzle 90 degrees so that it is horizontal; instead I turn it 45 degrees. That seems to work for me. If anything, I think that the new nozzle (or is it the paint formulation?) produces a finer, more cloud-like spray than the old cans do. As you noted, the old can nozzle produces a tight, cone-shaped spray. I think that the old version of Krylon probably needed that spray pattern because the solvent paint carrier was so volatile. The nozzle needed to produce a very direct, tight spray pattern in order to get the paint onto the surface fast, before the solvent evaporated. I also think that if you replaced the nozzles on the new Krylon with the older style, they would deliver too much paint too fast. As I mentioned before, you really have to refrain from flooding the surface with paint when you use the new formulation.

Krylon's current primers appear to be the same as they have always been. They have no recoat window; you can recoat anytime with their primers. I never use Kilz primer; it is meant for color- and stain-blocking on interior surfaces. I work to make the bare surface smooth and defect-free before I start to paint, so I don't need to apply a thick coat of primer very often. When I do, though, I use Dupli-Color High Build primer. I have also used Plasti-Coat Sandable primer for that in the past, but now I stick with the DC, because I think that it is just a notch better.

I buy nearly all of my spray paint at Walmart. I often consider buying Walmart spray paint, but I almost always end up going with Krylon, because I like their colors better. I feel the same way about Rustoleum. I do buy RO for some colors, though. I am also getting ready to try some Valspar, too. That brand also has some pretty neat colors. These discussions about spray paint seem to come up quite often, yet no one ever seems to mention using it.

MarkII
Spot on Mark...

Here's the lowdown on nozzles-- this is in particular from the Teejet information we get at pesticide training, but it's "physics" so it applies just as well to paint nozzles... aerosol type anyway-- air injected 'paint guns' work on a different principle...

The wider the spray pattern angle, the finer the droplets. So a wide fan type nozzle is going to produce smaller droplets than a narrow cone type nozzle like we're typically used to on paint cans. The higher the liquid pressure, the smaller the droplets-- so a warm can of paint will have higher pressure and therefore smaller droplets than a cold can of paint or one with it's aerosol propellant nearly depleted. The smaller the orifice, the finer the droplets... in addition to the fact that it's delivering less product per second than a larger sized nozzle.

You hit the nail on the head with the old Krylon having a narrow-cone type nozzle to reduce the 'solvent flash' that can lead to dry spray and orange peel. Lacquers, typically using "hotter" solvents, are prone to those solvents evaporating before the paint physically hits the surface to which it's being applied, sticking to the surface, and flowing together with adjacent droplets into a film of liquified paint. Partially dried droplets hitting the surface stand out like 'grit' and don't flow together, leading to 'dry spray' and orange peel. Slower solvents aren't so prone to this, so typically the slower solvents used with enamels don't suffer from this problem as much. BUT it also means that the solvent evaporates more slowly, leading to the paint being more 'runny' on the object painted for a longer period of time, and heavy coats containing more solvent are more prone to run. It also means that a nozzle that puts out 'just the right amount of paint' with lacquer will probably put out 'too much' with an enamel (anecdotally speaking, anyway). It also means that a solid-cone pattern nozzle with a low spray pattern angle will produce coarser droplets than a flat-fan nozzle with a high-angle pattern, which is being used in the New Krylon... typically speaking a flat fan nozzle and a solid cone nozzle with equivalent size orifices and equal spray pattern angles will produce roughly the same size droplets, with the cone nozzle producing a slightly finer droplet usually. Hollow cone nozzles produce MUCH finer droplets than solid-cone, but hollow cone pattern nozzles are not used on rattle cans-- only solid cone pattern AFAIK. Widening the pattern angle also breaks the droplets up finer.

Part of it is probably the formulation of the paint as well, and the solvent 'speed'. Since Krylon went to the trouble to reformulating their paint for EPA reasons (presumably) it's probably likely they went with one of the 'slowest' solvents they could, especially in their 'consumer' paints. (NOTE: most of the OLD Krylon colors are still available as lacquer formulations as INDUSTRIAL COATINGS available from industrial supply's like Graingers) That way when the regs inevitably tighten in the future at some point, they'd probably still be 'under the line' and not have to bother reformulating again.

Like I said, New Krylon isn't a TERRIBLE paint, but there are DEFINITELY better paints out there, including the 99 cent walmart stuff. I for one would pretty well rank it down near the bottom of the list, though.

Later! OL JR :)
 
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MarkII

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Spot on Mark...
:cheers:


Like I said, New Krylon isn't a TERRIBLE paint, but there are DEFINITELY better paints out there, including the 99 cent walmart stuff. I for one would pretty well rank it down near the bottom of the list, though.

Later! OL JR :)
That's why it's so great to have so many different brands. We can all decide for ourselves which ones we like and want to use. :)

But let me repeat: does anyone have any reviews of Valspar paint, specifically the variety that is sold at Michael's (which is different from the variety sold at Lowe's)?

MarkII
 

kandsrockets

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:cheers:


That's why it's so great to have so many different brands. We can all decide for ourselves which ones we like and want to use. :)

But let me repeat: does anyone have any reviews of Valspar paint, specifically the variety that is sold at Michael's (which is different from the variety sold at Lowe's)?

MarkII
Mark,
I have used the copper by valspar from Michael's but not on a rocket. I used in a subwoofer encloser. I sprayed the inside with the copper then sprayed black, gray, white fleck over it and clearcoated the entire thing with krylon clear. The valspar paint went on nice over duplicolor primer and did not lift while spraying other brands over it. I did let the valspar dry for a week before putting anything over it but that was only because I had to order the color fleck I wanted. I know I will use it again for the application I used it for.
 

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I've had no problems with multiple topcoats in less than 1 hr. with the new Krylon. Just paint a light coat wait 10 minutes and recoat. The can says recoat within 1 hr or after 24 hours. I primered and sanded like 3 coats over a three day period. Then waited a couple days and put 4 topcoats on in 1 hour and was done. This was a white rocket with white primer. I then waited a week to paint fins with orange Testors. No problems. It looks silky smoothe, though I didn't apply any clear. Dude at launch ask what I painted it with and couldn't believe it.
 

leegscott

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Seems like every project the TRF comes though with a little help. This time it was finding the old Krylon. Sure enough, I gave Grainger a call and yes they still carry the old Indoor / Exterior Paint, all you want. My shipment should arrive on Thursday. However, you do have to have a business account. Well for this project I am going to go ahead and use the old formula as the launch date is fast approaching. As far as the new formula, I am going to wait for the next project when I have plenty of time.

Again Thanks everyone that responded!!
 

NjCo

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I've had no problems with multiple topcoats in less than 1 hr. with the new Krylon. Just paint a light coat wait 10 minutes and recoat. The can says recoat within 1 hr or after 24 hours. I primered and sanded like 3 coats over a three day period. Then waited a couple days and put 4 topcoats on in 1 hour and was done. This was a white rocket with white primer. I then waited a week to paint fins with orange Testors. No problems. It looks silky smoothe, though I didn't apply any clear. Dude at launch ask what I painted it with and couldn't believe it.
This has been my experience with seven other rockets I've painted or repainted since Spring. I've used three different brands of primer (Krylon, Rustoleum and another brand I found at Michael's). I've applied Testors or Rustoleum over Krylon. I've applied every brand of paint over every brand of primer. All without any problems. And then this last time around I'm just applying a 2nd coat of white using the same can of Krylon and I run into a problem. It's like voodoo or something. :dark:
 

accooper

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Last weekend, 10/24/09, I painted the primer, and base coats on three rockets I am working on. I wonder, if the weather is good, if they will be dry enough to paint the color coats on.

I have been told that the reason for all this is to protect the environment.

Andrew
You can't swing a dead cat around here with out hitting some one from Green Peace- Kinky Freedman
 

rokitflite

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Seems like every project the TRF comes though with a little help. This time it was finding the old Krylon. Sure enough, I gave Grainger a call and yes they still carry the old Indoor / Exterior Paint, all you want. My shipment should arrive on Thursday. However, you do have to have a business account. Well for this project I am going to go ahead and use the old formula as the launch date is fast approaching. As far as the new formula, I am going to wait for the next project when I have plenty of time.

Again Thanks everyone that responded!!
Yep, good old Grainger! I have not bought a can of the new Krylon yet:D.
 

luke strawwalker

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Last weekend, 10/24/09, I painted the primer, and base coats on three rockets I am working on. I wonder, if the weather is good, if they will be dry enough to paint the color coats on.

I have been told that the reason for all this is to protect the environment.

Andrew
You can't swing a dead cat around here with out hitting some one from Green Peace- Kinky Freedman

Yep, that's true... VOC regulations... can't have those volatile organic compounds destroying the environment... of course nature produces MEGATONS of VOC's as a byproduct of natural decomposition and life processes, but as usual, to the greenies, that doesn't matter...

Too bad that ol' Kinky didn't make it... we need some mavericks with some common sense in positions of power...

Your primer should be well and truly dry after a week. Couldn't see why not. I sand Walmart Colorplace after only an hour or two-- but sometimes it IS still a bit 'gummy' on the paper... :D OL JR :)
 

accooper

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I have found that you are right about Walmart paint. I am going to wait till Saturday to finish up the three rockets on the assembly line. The Mrs. says I can't build anymore till those three are done!

Thanks
Andrew
 

MarkII

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Yep, that's true... VOC regulations... can't have those volatile organic compounds destroying the environment.
You know, I keep reading this assertion about Krylon, and it causes me to wonder -- what exactly did Krylon change in the formulation of their general purpose spray paint to make it more environmentally friendly? Could you please explain the chemistry, and describe how it makes the new formula less harmful to the environment? Because from what I can tell, the new version of Krylon is no more "Earth-friendly" than the old formula was. So if I am wrong, please educate me about this, if you will.

of course nature produces MEGATONS of VOC's as a byproduct of natural decomposition and life processes, but as usual, to the greenies, that doesn't matter...
Which environmental groups pressured Krylon into changing its formula? Which groups thought that individual cans of spray paint being sold through the retail channel were such a major source of environmental pollution? So significant of a source, in fact, that they initiated a campaign to pressure Krylon to change its consumer line of general purpose spray paints from lacquer-based to alkyl-based? Show me the press releases, please? And why just focus on Krylon, while leaving Rustoleum, Valspar, Dupli-Color, Walmart, Dutch Boy, etc. alone? And if such a campaign was actually behind the move by Krylon to change its formulation, then surely it must have been a truly significant victory for the groups that were sponsoring the campaign. Show me the press releases from them, celebrating their big victory. Because I must have missed all of that, since I don't remember hearing anything about it. You know, if people hadn't posted so many rants on the various rocketry forums about Krylon's change in formulation, I doubt that I would have even noticed it.

It's funny, but I don't remember the presidency of George W. Bush as being exactly a golden era for environmental protection. Yet that was when Krylon moved to change its spray paint. But as I can tell from reading posts on rocketry forums, environmental groups are the all-purpose bogeymen who are responsible for every bad thing that has happened to our hobby. I am waiting for someone to claim that the real reasons that Estes stopped making the B14 engine, discontinued the Fat Boy and started putting more powerful ejection charges in their motors were all because of pressure from environmental groups.

BTW, regardless of any putative environmental pollution that it might have caused, it can certainly be argued that the VOC's in Krylon's old formula presented a hazard to the health of the person applying the paint, but that is quite a different matter than saying that they were harmful to the environment. But even so, as plenty of people have pointed out, Krylon still makes and sells spray paint with the old formula. So it doesn't appear that they have been restricted from making it after all, at least not by any non-economic or non-market factors.

I have nothing against Walmart spray paint. How could I, if I have hardly ever used it? One of the big reasons why I haven't used it more is because it is not readily available where I live. The nearest Walmart to me is approx. 64 miles away (well over an hour's drive on mountain roads). But I can find Krylon and Rustoleum in every hardware store in the area, and I can buy Dupli-Color in every auto parts store. I have far more experience with those paints (particularly Krylon, because it is the least expensive and most plentiful of the three brands) because of that.

MarkII
 
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Micromeister

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You know, I keep reading this assertion about Krylon, and it causes me to wonder -- what exactly did Krylon change in the formulation of their general purpose spray paint to make it more environmentally friendly? Could you please explain the chemistry, and describe how it makes the new formula less harmful to the environment? Because from what I can tell, the new version of Krylon is no more "Earth-friendly" than the old formula was. So if I am wrong, please educate me about this, if you will.

Which environmental groups pressured Krylon into changing its formula? Which groups thought that individual cans of spray paint being sold through the retail channel were such a major source of environmental pollution? So significant of a source, in fact, that they initiated a campaign to pressure Krylon to change its consumer line of general purpose spray paints from lacquer-based to alkyl-based? Show me the press releases, please? And why just focus on Krylon, while leaving Rustoleum, Valspar, Dupli-Color, Walmart, Dutch Boy, etc. alone? And if such a campaign was actually behind the move by Krylon to change its formulation, then surely it must have been a truly significant victory for the groups that were sponsoring the campaign. Show me the press releases from them, celebrating their big victory. Because I must have missed all of that, since I don't remember hearing anything about it. You know, if people hadn't posted so many rants on the various rocketry forums about Krylon's change in formulation, I doubt that I would have even noticed it.

It's funny, but I don't remember the presidency of George W. Bush as being exactly a golden era for environmental protection. Yet that was when Krylon moved to change its spray paint. But as I can tell from reading posts on rocketry forums, environmental groups are the all-purpose bogeymen who are responsible for every bad thing that has happened to our hobby. I am waiting for someone to claim that the real reasons that Estes stopped making the B14 engine, discontinued the Fat Boy and started putting more powerful ejection charges in their motors were all because of pressure from environmental groups.

BTW, regardless of any putative environmental pollution that it might have caused, it can certainly be argued that the VOC's in Krylon's old formula presented a hazard to the health of the person applying the paint, but that is quite a different matter than saying that they were harmful to the environment. But even so, as plenty of people have pointed out, Krylon still makes and sells spray paint with the old formula. So it doesn't appear that they have been restricted from making it after all, at least not by any non-economic or non-market factors.

I have nothing against Walmart spray paint. How could I, if I have hardly ever used it? One of the big reasons why I haven't used it more is because it is not readily available where I live. The nearest Walmart to me is approx. 64 miles away (well over an hour's drive on mountain roads). But I can find Krylon and Rustoleum in every hardware store in the area, and I can buy Dupli-Color in every auto parts store. I have far more experience with those paints (particularly Krylon, because it is the least expensive and most plentiful of the three brands) because of that.

MarkII
I could go into all the chemistry but Why bother! The EPA simple isn't worth my time typing, but they are responsable for ALL the changes in formulations of Paints, Reducers and additives nationwide. Further the EPA got it's power boost from the Clinton years Not Bush. They've been after the rattle can industry and all Paint application entities for a couple decades I believe the appeals were exhausted in 2006 or 07? It's just taken this amont of time for most of the paint manufacturers to rework and reformulate to what they "Think" will comply.
I can't stand the new krylon alternative. As Luke mention it gotta be the worst crap I've ever had the displeasure of using. Nozzle fan aside there is simple nothing good to say about it unless one is only sparying a single color on whatever. Check the Serria Club web pages i'm sure you'll find plenty of "somethings" in there discribing their glee.

Why continue to complain and argue about things we can't change? I don't understand the continuation of thread like this..Move on, We have Plenty of other brands currently that work better and don't cause as many problems. They too well be changing shortly but for now....be happy. I've stocked up on old formula Krylon, Rustoleum and a couple others that continue to do the job for me. If and when they run out I'll be going to water based acrylics which is by the way where our good old EPA would like all paints to end. But it is the Darn Greeners causing all this.. It wasn't on the words and phrases that upset people most but it sure should have been! I'm so sick of hearing Green this and Green that I could spit. Finally people are waking up to the unfortunate truth that Al is full on condensed horse crap clear up to his too close together set brown eyeballs. Perhaps in the next few years the rest will come around to conclude what many already know... These Changes are natural and re-occuring and the hype is nothing but BULL. I'm all for planting more trees, but come on VOC's are not deforresting the planet.... are Chain saws next LOL!!!!!

As for being a health hazard; Most everything we breath, eat or drink is a health hazard of one sort or another.
Remember; Excercise, Eat health, Do the right things....DIE anyway. These earth-suits we are wearing are only a temporary shell, not intended to last all that long;)
 
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