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Need a drogue with GPS?

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timothyterpsalot

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Noobie here with a question. I'm just thinking ahead and want to learn more about this. Do fliers often not use a drogue when using a GPS? Would it make sense not to if the rocket is going to around 20,000 ft. or less?
 

cjl

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I don't see why the use of a GPS and the use of a drogue are related. I use a drogue depending on the weight and drag of the rocket (I have some that would not work well at all without a drogue, and some that work fine drogueless), and I use a GPS depending on the altitude the rocket is expected to attain.
 

cjl

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Dual deployment? If you're going to 20kft without dual deploy, even with a GPS, that's a heck of a risk. I would almost always do dual deployment for a rocket going high enough to need GPS (unless you enjoy 10 mile hikes around your launch site).
 

timothyterpsalot

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I was wondering becuase rocksim says that a rocket going to 15,000 ft. W/O DD then falling at 22 fps in 14mph winds will land 1.7 mi from the launch site. That doesn't seem too bad, and if launching under more calm conditions, I don't see the need for DD.
 

cjl

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That's incorrect, first of all - it would land 2.65 miles away from the point of deployment. Second, that's assuming equal wind at all altitudes - wind is often higher at higher altitude. Also, having hiked after many rockets, I wouldn't really want to hike 1.7 miles with a 30lb rocket if I didn't have to. I've flown DD rockets to 12k feet that landed less than half a mile away.
 

JDcluster

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Buy their more expensive version ( http://www.apogeerockets.com/RS-PRO.asp ) & see what that says about popping the chute at 20k & see how far it lands....



JD



I was wondering becuase rocksim says that a rocket going to 15,000 ft. W/O DD then falling at 22 fps in 14mph winds will land 1.7 mi from the launch site. That doesn't seem too bad, and if launching under more calm conditions, I don't see the need for DD.
 

dlb

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drogue at 20K in 14 mph wind = longggggggg walk!
 

Chrisn

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There isnt going to be a drouge, its the main that will be deployed at apogee. Get your passport ready.
 

WillMarchant

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but its not as accurate. Hes saying get RS PRO and see what it has to say.

Ben
$1000.00 is a lot of money to spend on something that probably won't give you an accurate estimate unless you feed it winds aloft data. This thread seems to be about "back of the envelope."
 

falingtrea

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I think there are two main questions to ask when deciding to use dual deploy:

How far do you want to walk to retrieve a rocket? If 1.7 or more miles is an acceptable walk for you. That much of a walk for me and I would be like :hot:

How much range area do you have for retrieval? In the desert or farmland you probably have miles of space, but some places may have retrieval space limits.

I don't think locator systems, such as GPS or radio direction finding, should be the driving factor for whether to use dual deploy or not. But having a locator system would improve the chances of finding the rocket after it drifts for many miles, if you don't use dual deploy. :D
 

talkin Monkey

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THAT high!...Yes, dual deploy would be ummmm....sensible. GPS/Tracking, pretty obvious logic considering all the variables. Much cheaper than a passport and guide
:2:
 

JDcluster

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Wind speeds above 3k are going to change dramatically & can be blowing in opposite directions. I've gone to almost 12k & had to walk ( actually drive to the other side of the field via local roads) almost 2 miles where the winds were near 0 mph on the ground. Even with the best conditions, I highly doubt you really be able to pop the chute at 20k & get to land within a 2 mile radius.


JD
 

JDcluster

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I was using RS Pro as an example that RS is just scratching the surface when you try to figure out landing zone guesstimates & you really need more data.
Also at 20k you might have trouble by "just popping the chute" by any means.

Have you ever flown a rocket over 5,000ft?




JD
 

bobkrech

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Noobie here with a question. I'm just thinking ahead and want to learn more about this. Do fliers often not use a drogue when using a GPS? Would it make sense not to if the rocket is going to around 20,000 ft. or less?
Tim

The recommended descent rate under a main parachute is ~15 fps. A 10 mph wind will move your rocket sideways ~15 fps. If you reached 20 kft and popped a main under such conditions, you could have a 4 mile recovery trek, and that might be conservative since the upper level winds are usually stronger and may well come from a totally different direction than at ground level. Splitting the rocket or deploying a drogue at apogee and deploying a main at 300' will likely reduce the walk by a factor of 4.

To launch a rocket that gets to 20,000 you need to be L3 high power certified, and during the certification process you will need to learn all about this sort of stuff.

Go find you local rocket club and attend some launches and talk to the folks. You can find out where they are at http://www.nar.org and http://www.tripoli.org

Also pick up and read the following two books which will explain most of what you need to know.

Handbook of Model Rocketry 7th Edition
2004. By the late G. Harry Stine and Bill Stine. Over 350 pages covering all aspects of model rocketry. If you need to find an answer to your rocketry questions, start here! This volume belongs in the library of every serious rocketeer. The official manual of the NAR. Cover price $22.95

Modern High Power Rocketry-Second Edition
By Mark Canepa. This Second Edition of Modern High-Power Rocketry contains more than 800 black-and-white photographs and illustrations specifically created to introduce the model rocket enthusiast to the exciting world of high-power rocketry. Completely rewritten, photographed, and designed, this book provides tips and simple advice on motor retention, ejection charges, the high-power launch and building your first Level One, Level Two and Level Three rockets.

$17.00 and $28.00 respectively from NARTS https://blastzone.com/nar/narts/store.asp?groupid=1080035015601

Bob
 

cjl

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One note Bob: I've seen an I motor launched to 16k, and there have been K motors launched to near 30k, so you definitely don't need an L3 to get to 20k feet. Other than that though, I fully agree with your post.
 

troj

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The recommended descent rate under a main parachute is ~15 fps. A 10 mph wind will move your rocket sideways ~15 fps. If you reached 20 kft and popped a main under such conditions, you could have a 4 mile recovery trek, and that might be conservative since the upper level winds are usually stronger and may well come from a totally different direction than at ground level. Splitting the rocket or deploying a drogue at apogee and deploying a main at 300' will likely reduce the walk by a factor of 4.
Agreed! Especially the wind direction bit -- we've had ground winds coming from the exact opposite direction of upper level winds.

To launch a rocket that gets to 20,000 you need to be L3 high power certified, and during the certification process you will need to learn all about this sort of stuff.
L2 rockets can hit 20K AGL and higher; most do not, but it can (and does) happen.

Go find you local rocket club and attend some launches and talk to the folks. You can find out where they are at http://www.nar.org and http://www.tripoli.org
That, right there, in my opinion is the best advice anyone can get, or give. Local, experienced people can teach you a LOT more than a book.

-Kevin
 

ragid

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20,000 feet is pretty high for popping the main. However there are some areas where is is doable (with a long walk or drive). The Black Rock desert is one of them. The Salt Flats is another. I have flown to around 10,000 twice without a drogue at the Salt Flats. One time the rocket landed 500 feet away. The other time it was 3.5 miles. Luckily on the flats you just head out in the direction the rocket went and you eventually find it. Everything shows up well against the white salt, so you can see your rocket a long ways off.
 

timothyterpsalot

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I was using RS Pro as an example that RS is just scratching the surface when you try to figure out landing zone guesstimates & you really need more data.
Also at 20k you might have trouble by "just popping the chute" by any means.

JD
JD, what did you mean at 20k you might have trouble popping the chute? Is that the point where air pressure starts becoming an issue?

Also, I live in Kansas City and the closest clubs that seem to be active is Kloudbusters and the Nebraska group; both are 3 1/2 hours away. There is a Kansas City group but it doesn't seem to be very active. That's why I prefer to ask most of my questions on here as I can't make it down there for every launch.
Like I said, I'm just wanting to learn about all this.
 

Len_Lekx

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I think there are two main questions to ask when deciding to use dual deploy:

How far do you want to walk to retrieve a rocket? If 1.7 or more miles is an acceptable walk for you. That much of a walk for me and I would be like :hot:

How much range area do you have for retrieval? In the desert or farmland you probably have miles of space, but some places may have retrieval space limits.
There's also the question of who owns the neighbouring properties, and how amenable they are to having rockets fall on their lands. Some people will be okay with it, while others are not so accepting.

It's always a good idea to design the rocket to fall *within* the limits of your range - whatever those limits may be. For high-altitude flights, that typically means dual-deployment.
 

troj

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It's always a good idea to design the rocket to fall *within* the limits of your range - whatever those limits may be. For high-altitude flights, that typically means dual-deployment.
It's a requirement to keep them within the limits of your waiver....

-Kevin
 
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