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Motor Hooks?

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accooper

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Anyone here make their own motor hooks, and if so, what do you make them out of?

Andrew
 

accooper

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Thanks for the info. Have you ever tried this.

Andrew
 

tbzep

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I've never used them, but I've seen some rockets with them. I reckon they work pretty well.

If I don't have a hook handy when I'm building a rocket, I just leave it off and friction fit the motors. I've never had any problems with friction fitting, and the rocket looks more clean without a hook.
 

Peartree

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Thanks for the info. Have you ever tried this.

Andrew
Absolutely. The only "store bought" motor hooks I have came in kits. Nearly all my scratch builds have motor hooks made this way. I would challenge you to tell the difference.
 

Boosterdude

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I've been using the windshield wiper wire for the past three years, it works great. I agree with the Pear, you can't tell a difference.

Just go to your local auto parts store, the old blades are in the trash. Or just replace your blades.
 

accooper

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man, you guys are the tops. All these great ideas to help an old BAR like me. You know, no one will bother me when I go through trash cans, cause I'm old. :D

Andrew
 

tibadoe

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And to think I just threw away 2 sets this weekend. :(
 

clreynolds

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Two things to be aware of in your search.

1) Tons of wiper refills use all plastic guides, and are useless to us.

2) The metal guide strips do come in various sizes. Very handy for making hooks for various sizes of rockets. But, you do have to sort out your collection some times to match.

I agree that it is amost impossible to tell the difference, even from my own stash.
 

accooper

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I was like a old dude. I went and picked through the trash of my closest auto parts and found some old windshield washer blades and all you guys were right. I now have the materials to make quite a few hooks.

BTW here in south Texas we have been under a burn ban due to the lack of rain, and you sure don't want a hot engine casing to go tumbling into the dry grass. I have in the past had casings that still had embers in them even after I recovered them.

Thanks for all the info.

Andrew
 

powderburner

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We had a spell of drought here in N. Texas that lasted a couple years. We had on-and-off burn bans (mostly on) but when I called the Ft Worth Fire Marshall and asked about launching model rockets, he replied without hesitation that modrocs were fine, go right ahead and launch.

Never hurts to ask.

Also, if you can reduce the fire hazard by elevating the launcher, or covering the ground with a big tarp, or by having water and/or chemical fire extinguishers onsite, you can go a long ways toward convincing a hesitant official. Maybe you could launch from a paved area (edge of a parking lot?) and slant the launchers to target recovery over a grassy area?

Since you probably won't be able to get it in writing, make note of the phone conversation date, time, name of the person who approved your launch, his official "title" and phone number. Hang on to that info.
 

accooper

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Where we launch the land owner is very nice about it. But just to be safe and continue to have a great place to fly, we decided to try our best not to allow our engines to eject.

I thing the best idea I have heard is yours about elevating the launch pads. I myself, believe the greatest fire hazard is at lift off.

Thanks for the ideas.

Andrew
 

powderburner

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(for me, at least) is so that I don't have to kneel/bend down into the dirt to see where to hook up the launch controller leads to the igniter. I hate that. Around here, there are usually fire ants either directly under the launcher or very close by. I either use a tall launch pad (kind of on stilts instead of legs) or I use an old card table to hold an Estes-style launch pad. Either way, the pad is up in the air and much easier to see and reach. You will need to mod your launch controller slightly to add more wire length to stay 15 feet away.

Additional benefit: if there are kids nearby, they usually get excited about the launches if they have never seen them before. A launch pad on the ground puts the tip of the launch rod below eyeball level for most of these kids, and the launch rod is just about invisible unless you are deliberately looking for it (which, of course, they don't know to do). I don't like the risk of a kid bending over the top of the launcher and poking the launch rod into their face, so the elevated launcher takes care of that too.

And while we're at it, grab some old carpet squares (they don't have to look pretty, they just have to be carpet) or shop floor mat cushion material to cover the launch controller leads between the launcher and your control "station" setup. This prevents the kids from kicking the wires and yanking on the launcher or control unit, and helps keep your blood pressure down.

I thing the best idea I have heard is yours about elevating the launch pads. I myself, believe the greatest fire hazard is at lift off.
 

Micromeister

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Couldn't agree with you more Powderburner. Getting the models Up off the ground as far as possible has so many advantages over our old stand-by Estes port-a-pads I don't know were to start.
Micro, LPR or MPR Upscale clusters having them at least 36" off the ground greatly reduces the chance of any of the "Unseen" burning Particles from making it to the ground "hot". I think one of the most amazing things learned from night launches was just how much fire we don't see during the day! Just look at the spark shower for 4 D12-3's in the pic below. it's enough to scare most into getting HIGHER launch pads LOL! deflector height on my everyday/solar launcher is 38" when the legs are open.

Not to mention the wonderful break it gives our Knees and backs from all that bending over during hook-ups. I fly my Micros for a Camera Tripod that gets them 42" off the ground.

h2c_404-4D NovaPayloader-ll_Lift-Off Flt Pg_07-12-97.jpg


MM 264b2_Halloween Odd-Roc on pad_10-09-04.jpg
 

accooper

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Height does matter. I have no doubt on that. I cannot say how many launches I have made in my life time, and as you have all said and we agree on is that liftoff is the worst time for fires.

Andrew
 

Pem Tech

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I've never used them, but I've seen some rockets with them. I reckon they work pretty well.

If I don't have a hook handy when I'm building a rocket, I just leave it off and friction fit the motors. I've never had any problems with friction fitting, and the rocket looks more clean without a hook.
I second that emotion.....
Never really cared for motor hooks.
 

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