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bsexton

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I am helping a physics teacher that is mentoring a group of students that will be studying the variation of total impulse for B6-4 model rocket engines. He is looking for reference materials that the students can cite in their work.

..."We ask the students to reference scientific sources in their paper. I gave them a copy of the engine section from the NAR handbook by Bill Stine, but do you know of any other books or peer reviewed journals that would have information accessible to seniors taking freshman level physics? "

Thanks for any suggestions.
 

DynaSoar

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Originally posted by bsexton
I am helping a physics teacher that is mentoring a group of students that will be studying the variation of total impulse for B6-4 model rocket engines. He is looking for reference materials that the students can cite in their work.

..."We ask the students to reference scientific sources in their paper. I gave them a copy of the engine section from the NAR handbook by Bill Stine, but do you know of any other books or peer reviewed journals that would have information accessible to seniors taking freshman level physics? "

Thanks for any suggestions.
The motors are tested by NAR and the results are published at
http://nar.org/SandT/NARenglist.shtml (check the link from each motor type to its testing results notice). These results are standardized. Standardized instruments are as acceptable as peer reviewed journal articles as far as most fields are concerned, since the standardization process usually includes this.

As for the standardization itself, from http://nar.org/NARsandt.html

"Model rocket engines are tested according to criteria found in National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes 1122 (for model rocket motors) and 1127 (for high-power rocket motors). These include accurate total impulse and time delay; sensitivity to shock, temperature, and other environmental considerations; adequacy of safety instructions; and gross operational correctness."

NFPA 1122 and 1127 are not free for the download anywhere I know of. They cost $24.50 each from NFPA: http://www.nfpa.org/

You might be able to find these in a library nearby, or have a local library find them and borrow them via interlibrary loan. I haven't seen them, but I'm betting if they don't describe how they were derived, they will contain references to the articles on the development of them.
 
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