Quantcast

MMX Space Ship One.

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

Micromeister

Micro Craftman/ClusterNut
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
15,074
Reaction score
38
Location
Washington DC
A plans section is a GREAT idea.
Here's one I hope lots will enjoy
 

MarkII

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
8,255
Reaction score
9
The Currell Graphics SpaceShipOne was the most difficult, time-consuming and complicated cardmodeling project that I have ever done! Well worth the effort, though. I built mine back in 2004, the same year that I got back into flying rockets. Someday I'll build a flying version with a 13mm mount in it. I built mine out of 110 lb. cardstock, and it is surprisingly sturdy, but way too heavy for Micromaxx. Another, similarly built flying version would hold up fine to the thrust from a 1/2A without needing any reinforcement, I would think.

Mark \\.

DSCF0742-compressed.JPG
 

Micromeister

Micro Craftman/ClusterNut
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
15,074
Reaction score
38
Location
Washington DC
Seems kinda funny that all cardstock models would be "Too Heavy" for micro flight unless it's a lot bigger then I'm imagining from the photos???
The Micro Model SSO from my plan is mostly Basswood with a ton of noseweight, Still it flys out of sight very quickly on MMX-II motors. I've actually lost one that came down unseen even with the streamer:(
 

rstaff3

Oddroc-eteer
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
11,765
Reaction score
10
The Currell Graphics SpaceShipOne was the most difficult, time-consuming and complicated cardmodeling project that I have ever done! Well worth the effort, though. I built mine back in 2004, the same year that I got back into flying rockets. Someday I'll build a flying version with a 13mm mount in it. I built mine out of 110 lb. cardstock, and it is surprisingly sturdy, but way too heavy for Micromaxx. Another, similarly built flying version would hold up fine to the thrust from a 1/2A without needing any reinforcement, I would think.

Mark \\.
Yeah, this model needs a 13mm mount. It did fly on MicroMaxx, but barely. You'll see reports on another version that flew nicely on the uber-powerful A10 :)
 

MarkII

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
8,255
Reaction score
9
Seems kinda funny that all cardstock models would be "Too Heavy" for micro flight unless it's a lot bigger then I'm imagining from the photos???
The Micro Model SSO from my plan is mostly Basswood with a ton of noseweight, Still it flys out of sight very quickly on MMX-II motors. I've actually lost one that came down unseen even with the streamer:(
Indeed it is quite a bit larger than your MMX model, John. Your micro model is just a hair over 3" long, with a 3" total wingspan, and it weighs 10.75 grams. The Currell Graphics model is about 7.25" long, with a 7" total wingspan. It can certainly be built with lighter weight paper than the 110 lb. cardstock that I used (and it probably should be, too), but my model weighs approximately 18 grams. Mine is a static display model; add a motor mount, recovery system, and nose weight, and it becomes obvious that the CG model, at least as I built it, would not get off the launch pad on a Micromaxx-II. Using that heavyweight paper adds a lot of strength, though. The Currell Graphics model has quite a bit of internal structure in the form of multiple bulkheads, beams and spars (all made out of paper), and the wings and fuselage of my heavy cardstock version could easily handle the thrust and ejection charge of an A10 without any problems. If you held it in your hand, you would think that it was made out of pressed and molded paperboard, like the kind used in egg cartons, or even lightweight carved balsa. It is definitely not a Micromaxx model, but I mentioned it because Bob had cited his review of his MMX version.

You could possibly scale down the printout of the parts sheets for the CG model, if you were a total masochist. As it is, the model has some parts that are folded into details that are literally smaller than the head of a pin. Imagine cutting out and then folding patterns into a box and a pyramid that are that small, and then having to glue them onto precise spots on the wing and fuselage. Now think about doing the same thing with downscaled versions! :eek: I think that you went about it the right way with your model, John.

Mark \\.
 
Top