MIRV Styrene Sustainer Prototype

Discussion in 'Scratch Built' started by BABAR, Apr 6, 2019.

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  1. Apr 6, 2019 #1

    BABAR

    BABAR

    BABAR

    Builds Rockets for NASA TRF Supporter TRF Lifetime Supporter

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    Been working this one for a while. Based on a modification of Seattle Rocket Works MIRV Gryphon and Estes MIRV. Estes has the right idea, with 3 sustainers, each with a diamond shaped cross section of BOTH the rocket body AND the nose cone, all three "nesting" together at launch to create a single combined hexagonal sustainer structure.

    My issues with the Estes version of the MIRV were, first, IMO booster is underpowered.

    Second, I am not convinced the sustainers are really stable (although doesn't matter that much, as IF they deploy at a decent altitude of separation from sustainer, they won't go very far on A10-3T especially if they are indeed unstable)

    Third, sustainers are too heavy (which kind of goes back to first issue.)

    The "outside the box" (or in this case, perhaps putting it back INSIDE a BOX, just one without right angle sides) is the polygonal diamond body tube. Nose cones (technically pyramids) are also tricky, each is symmetrical right/left or yw, but NOT symmetrical up/down or pitch. So each nose itself is going to cause a certain amount of "off axis" lift.

    I tried styrene plastic for this.
    White Polystyrene 12" X 24" X .040" Plastic Sheet Styrene Pack of 4

    ran me around $13 on Amazon.
    The stuff is not easy to cut (takes a lot of runs with Exacto blade, then you can flex in and break it cleanly.) Not impossible, at least for straight cuts. Angled cuts are challenging, curved cuts would be really hard (maybe a roll here for that $400 Exacto knife seen on another thread.)

    It's a bit heavy. My flight was unstable, although I think it got off the pad with decent speed, just not enough finnage, and again the nose cone probably isn't helping things. I am thinking of trying heavy Card Stock. Certainly will be much easier to cut, also can "score" the outside angles and therefore "fold" the body tube into the right dimensions. I am running a BT-20 down the middle, which serves as combination of motor mount as well as container and attachment for parachute. For the fins, I may just either double or triple up the cardstock, or reinforce with Balsa. The fin pattern I am looking for will be the same as the Mach Double Diamond

    https://www.rocketryforum.com/threads/double-mach-diamond.149662/

    Anyway, differences from standard 3FNC include
    MultiStage
    MultiSustainer
    Polygonal Body Tubes
    Asymmetric Nose Cone/Pyramids.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2019
  2. Apr 6, 2019 #2

    BABAR

    BABAR

    BABAR

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    would help if I put the pics in.
     

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  3. Apr 6, 2019 #3

    BABAR

    BABAR

    BABAR

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    more pics
     

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  4. Apr 6, 2019 #4

    kuririn

    kuririn

    kuririn

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    Nice to see someone taking ideas and experimenting and extending the envelope.
    The 2 finned sustainers are designed to fly off in an arc, I believe. So yes, unstable.
    Some ideas:
    Styrofoam packing blocks can be shaped with a hobby saw or hot wire into a polygonal shape, then fine sanded.
    Polygonal nose cones can be foam or 3D printed. For foam attach a balsa nose block with foam safe CA for a shoulder.
    Should cut down the weight.
    However foam is easily subject to melting from the sustainer exhaust. So those areas should be covered.
    Have fun!
     
  5. Apr 6, 2019 #5

    GlenP

    GlenP

    GlenP

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    Wow, that looks awesome. Will look really cool nested together with the other sustainers. Your other MIRV builds are really cool too. Kind of makes sense to have 3 sustainers when motors come 3 in a pack, right? Will your booster be 24mm or 18mm?

    (PS - Seattle Rocket Works did the MIRV Gryphon, not Squirrel Works)
     
  6. Apr 6, 2019 #6

    BABAR

    BABAR

    BABAR

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    Thanks for correction. fixed.

    24 mm gives me a lot more flexibility.
     
  7. Apr 7, 2019 #7

    neil_w

    neil_w

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    I love that sustainer design. Looking forward to seeing where you take this one.
     

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