Microhybrid certification

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MarkII

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MarkII

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Bill,

One thing that might be discussed if the motor were ever submitted for certification - are the nitrous cartridges actually part of the engine, or are they just on-board storage tanks for the oxidizer? (And is that even a meaningful distinction?) If it is the latter, does it matter whether the manufacturer specifically authorizes their use in the S'Creamer? Do the manufacturers of bulk storage tanks for the nitrous used in the GSE for other hybrid motor systems specifically approve their use for such purposes?

I do realize that a lot of questions can only be answered by having the motor actually get submitted for certification, and then having S & T wrestle with them. I have no connection with Aerocon Systems, and I don't even own a S'Creamer (yet), but I am interested in the subject of microhybrids, and I have been wondering recently if there were any technical reasons why a commercially-made one such as this model could not be certified.

Mark \\.
 
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billspad

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Bill,

One thing that might be discussed if the motor were ever submitted for certification - are the nitrous cartridges actually part of the engine, or are they just on-board storage tanks for the oxidizer? (And is that even a meaningful distinction?) If it is the latter, does it matter whether the manufacturer specifically authorizes their use in the S'Creamer? Do the manufacturers of bulk storage tanks for the nitrous used in the GSE for other hybrid motor systems specifically approve their use for such purposes?
Go to the NFPA website and look at 1125 7.5.2.1, 7.5.2.2, and 7.5.2.3. They don't let you cut and paste text so I'll summarize. The "flight cylinder" has to be made of aluminum, composite or composite over aluminum. It has to comply with a DOT standard. The metal components must be brass aluminum or stainless. The hybrid standards in 1125 were based on what existed at the time it was written. There are a few things that don't make a lot of sense but we're stuck with it unless someone proposes a change at the next revision.


I do realize that a lot of questions can only be answered by having the motor actually get submitted for certification, and then having S & T wrestle with them. I have no connection with Aerocon Systems, and I don't even own a S'Creamer (yet), but I am interested in the subject of microhybrids, and I have been wondering recently if there were any technical reasons why a commercially-made one such as this model could not be certified.

Mark \\.
What would be more likely would be an existing manufacturer making one based on his existing design. The big obstacle would be the tiny market.
 
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