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hawlk2004

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ok as the title mentions need some info on lube and the reason for it being in this list is obvious I know not to use petroleum jelly but I keep hearing use water based but there's a problem I prep motors at home as much as I can so it could be a month or 3 before its fired. well water based are dry in 2 or 3 days. I also think it unwise to use alcohol based because it has the problem of both any suggestions so I can stop using PJ
 
The o-rings in your rocket motors have no problem with petroleum based lubricants. I use Super Lube, but some of the people who fly much larger motors at BALLS use Slick 50.


Steve Shannon
 
Dow 111 is my preference, Superlube is also good.

I also spray my case with CRC HD silicone spray, it really helps keep the case clean and the liners slide ride out.
 
Dow 111 is my preference, Superlube is also good.

I also spray my case with CRC HD silicone spray, it really helps keep the case clean and the liners slide ride out.

I really like the idea of the silicone spray. I'll have to get some.


Steve Shannon
 
Why is it obvious not to use petroleum jelly? I used it for a couple decades and hated it until finally switching to Superlube. Did I miss something?
 
Why is it obvious not to use petroleum jelly? I used it for a couple decades and hated it until finally switching to Superlube. Did I miss something?

There are many rubber items which should not be lubricated with petroleum based greases or oils, such as components in your brake systems on your car. I think those warnings transferred to this.


Steve Shannon
 
Would you mind posting a link? When I did a search on CRC HD silicone spray I got several different versions.

I am not very IT inclined as to how to post links, but CRC brand heavy duty silicone spray is available at Walmart, Amazon, and most auto parts stores.
 
The test question is regarding hybrids....

C29) Petroleum based lubricants should not be used with the oxygen or nitrous oxide systems
used in hybrids. Why?
A) They thicken when exposed to oxygen or nitrous oxide
B) They lose their lubricating properties when exposed to oxygen or nitrous oxide
C) There is a risk of spontaneous ignition or explosion
D) The lubricant can promote corrosion of the metal components in the presence oxygen or nitrous oxide
-----------------
The answer is “C“. Petroleum lubricants are a fuel. Oxygen rich environments are more likely to use
petroleum based lubricants as a fuel that could cause a risk of spontaneous ignition
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
So how is this related to the original question about conventional reloads? I am confused:confused:

It is not related. That was what I was pointing out. The comment in post #11 is not relevant to this discussion.
 
I always use red and tacky grease . it is a high heat high impact grease that doesn't break down with heat . All auto suply stores carry it .

Eric
 
It is a heavy duty bearing and axle grease , so it may contain trace amounts of lead . I wear latex gloves when building a motor so I'm not concerned . Been using it for 20 years with no issues.

Makes sense, I was thinking of unintended interactions, possibly negative, with various reloads and/or cases.

I don't have any particular reason to worry about it, just eliminating variables.
 
Makes sense, I was thinking of unintended interactions, possibly negative, with various reloads and/or cases.

I don't have any particular reason to worry about it, just eliminating variables.

I can't think of any negative side effects as the grease is never in contact with the fuel. I can also say from personal experience the grease has no negative effect on the delay grains as I always grease the back side of a delay grain , even if its a plugged clouser.

Eric
 
the grease on o-rings in motors is only to lubricate the o-rings during motor assembly. The grease has no effect or affect on how well the o-ring seals. People have used skin oils, Petroleum Jelly, and various common and exotic greases. As someone mentioned, AT supplies SuperLube with new motors but recommend Petroleum Jelly when the supplied amount runs out.

In AT motors, the sealing is done by compression when the end caps are screwed down. The o-rings need to be lubricated so they slide between compressing surfaces without damaging the o-ring while closing the end caps. In snap-ring, CTI and many other cases, the sealing is radially by squeezing the ring between the case and the nozzle/end cap. In these motors the lube is to allow easy assembly of the motor without damaging the o-ring when it is slid down the case.

In both types, the lubricant becomes irrelevant once the motor is assembled because it has already done the job its there for.

My personal experience is the Petroleum Jelly works perfectly fine in AT motors. I use PJ in motors up to L size. I would probably still be using it in CTI and Snap ring motors to M if I hadn't gotten tired of it turning liquid in the summer and making a huge mess. I switch to SuperLube because it doesn't melt in the summer sun, not because it works any better on o-rings.
 
In the music world, musicians use the phrase, "over-analysis leads to paralysis " I hope the OP doesn't just say forget it and grab the first thing he finds in the drawer


Of course it works in high heat areas.
 

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