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launch Lugs

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Launch Lug

  • One launch lug 1"-4"

  • Two Launch lugs 1/4"-1"

  • Rail buttons

  • None use a tower launcher

  • One or two lugs always on standoff

  • Break away launch lugs (lugs stay on launch rod)

  • What ever the instructions say


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CharlaineC

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Ok so I have been doing some major repairs and overhauls of a number of rockets a friend gave me. I noticed that the launch lugs where 2-4” long depending, and only one.
I have been using 2 launch lugs with angled cuts. Only ¼” – ½” long with great success. Ever since I can remember and have never had any issues but have seemed to gain performance. So I decided I would ask you all what you think. I also like to use standoffs on some modles to protect the paintjob
 
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Meat

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I was actually wondering the same thing just the other day I like to use two and stand offs was wondering everyone elses preference
 

jj94

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For LPR and some MPR, I like to use two lugs, one near the CG and another close to the bottom, with each lug being the same size. I make them anywhere from 1-2 inches depending on the size of the rocket.
 

lessgravity

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Depends on the rocket...
Anything above 'D' and I use rail buttons otherwise I stick to the instructions.
In LPR competition a tower is prefered.
 

judo

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I will usually use whatever the instructions say. If the lug seems to be too long I will cut it in two. I have started to use 1/16" stand offs more and more. I'll use scrap fin stock or wooden coffee stir sticks as stand offs as well.
 

MarkII

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In general, I use whatever arrangement the instructions say. I have never had any problems by doing that. Quite a few of the FSI models and a couple of Estes rockets that I have cloned use the split lug arrangement that you describe, so I have installed them that way a number of times. Some of my Micromaxx models also use that arrangement. And I'm quite familiar with putting lugs on stand-offs. The only thing about split lugs is that they are a bit more of a pain to install. (And yes, I use all of the tricks that people recommend.)

I have never used rail buttons, but I probably will eventually when I get around to building big rockets. I installed Acme rail guides on one rocket awhile back. Again, aligning two guides straight and in line with the rocket's long axis was a slight hassle, but I got it right before too long. The double-sided tape that Acme supplied with the guides didn't stick well at all on my rocket, and I wound up adhering them with CA.

I have no particular preference for one method or another; it really depends on the rocket's design and what will be powering it. I would definitely use the split lug method for long rockets, and would definitely go with rail buttons on large rockets (and not just because I already have a rail pad ;) ), but otherwise, I'm pretty flexible. If I'm building a kit, and the instructions say to install a certain lug a certain way, I feel "sure, why not?" and go ahead and use their method. Like I said, it's never been a problem.

Mark \\.
 

n5wd

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...So I decided I would ask you all what you think. I also like to use standoffs on some modles to protect the paintjob
Like others - it depends on the rockets. I'm tending to be building 3" rockets of various lengths, lately - the shortie (about 36" tip to bottom of fin) and my 29mm Big Daddy, got one 1/4" x 1" lug. The latest build, a TARC-task 48" got two 1/4 X 1" lugs, one on the booster, and one on the payload airframe.

I've got some more rail buttons on order, and plan to use lugs on up to about 2" rockets (except those that will be flown at my school - we'll only have a 1/4 " rod) by themselves... 2.6" and 3" rockets will probably get lugs and buttons... and anything larger than 3" buttons only.

All of the smaller rockets we'll fly at school will stay with 3/16" lugs.
 

JAL3

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I jsut do whatever seems to be the most inconspicuous when I get to the field and realize that I forgot to install them AGAIN.
 

CharlaineC

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I have been debating on trying my hand at one of the pop lug systems. I have herd that they're really good for scale and small rockets. though i am worried about issues with body damage
 
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Micromeister

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As with most polls you really missed a couple choices Charlaine:

using the best fit for the model being built!

or making something specifically for the model being built.

I never throw away a Launch lug from a kit, but 9 of out 10 times I'm using something other then what is supplied:)


heres the pop lug instructions for back in the day, hope it helps:)

466-e4-sm_Little Joe-II wire Launch Lugs_03-01-07.JPG
 

Handeman

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I had a single 1/2 dia. lug on my BD Thug. I'm in the middle of refinishing it and since the clubs where I fly are getting more and more rails, I'm going with rail buttons and get ride of the lugs altogether. For LPR, I would go with the instructions. If scratch building a LPR, I would go with two shorter lugs.

That confusing enough? :D
 

MarkII

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Practically all of my scratch-builds are clones. I use whatever lugs are specified in the parts lists, or reasonably close matches, and place them where the kit plans specify -- they are clones, after all. :D Just about all of the rest of the scratch-building I do is upscaling or downscaling, both of which, in their own ways, are types of cloning, too.

I am ecumenical about the subject of launch guiding components. Single lugs, double lugs, triple lugs, pop-lugs, stand-offs, buttons, rail guides, wire guides, towers, pistons, gimbaled motor mounts -- all are welcome on my rockets! (Just not all at the same time. :eek: ) And do you know why? It's because they are good enough, cheap enough (well, except for the gimbaled mounts) and, doggone it, I like them!

Kumbaya...Kumbaya... :D

Mark \\.

P. S. OK, who wants a hug? :p
 

MarkII

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Charlaine - In my opinion, the pop lug kit found on this page (scroll down past the shock cords) provides excellent, easy to follow instructions and it gives you a very useful and versatile lug. It is a great way to try out the method.

Mark \\.
 

Bazookadale

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I haven't use single lugs on a sport rocket since the '70s - there is no reason NOT to use 2 lugs, except on a tower launched competition model. I also have a habit of going oversize on the lugs, putting a 3/16 lug on a design that calls for 1/8 - 1/4 on a design that calls for 3/16 ect. This is laziness on mt part, I don't have to change rods as often that way. This sometimes causes confusion with RSOs that don't know me, I have a Big Brute designed for 1/4" rods that I put 1/2" lugs on, I tell the check in people that I want a 1/4" rod but sometimes I am told I MUST fly off the high power pads because it has 1/2" lugs. Oh well I'll walk a little further to fly an F or G, but I have flown it a hundred times from a 1/4" rod!
 

RoyAtl

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I generally use whatever is in the kit. Otherwise, I tend to use two lugs, bracketing the liftoff center of gravity, at least a quarter of the rocket length apart. One variation on that theme is that the lower lug could be at the bottom of the rocket.

If you use a single, tubular launch lug, it should be long, to minimize skew (and possible tip off)
 

CharlaineC

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this is what I wanted some great information thank you all lets keep it up.

As for the choises I was limited to only 7 when i planed it out I had 12 choices.
 

MarkII

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I haven't use single lugs on a sport rocket since the '70s - there is no reason NOT to use 2 lugs, except on a tower launched competition model. I also have a habit of going oversize on the lugs, putting a 3/16 lug on a design that calls for 1/8 - 1/4 on a design that calls for 3/16 ect. This is laziness on mt part, I don't have to change rods as often that way. This sometimes causes confusion with RSOs that don't know me, I have a Big Brute designed for 1/4" rods that I put 1/2" lugs on, I tell the check in people that I want a 1/4" rod but sometimes I am told I MUST fly off the high power pads because it has 1/2" lugs. Oh well I'll walk a little further to fly an F or G, but I have flown it a hundred times from a 1/4" rod!
...3/16" lug on a Micromaxx model... :eek: :D

Mk2
(grinning and ducking)
 

Micromeister

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Occasionally I'll use Pop lugs on micro models as well. this downscale "Sprint" model is fitted with a micro pop lug made with .020" music wire and a stir stick. Works like a charm;)
Pop lugs are So easy to make and use you my stop adding lugs to your models. I have a couple club friends who do just that. Now if I could only get them to remove the stop tape from the launch rods when there done ;)
 

Bazookadale

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...3/16" lug on a Micromaxx model... :eek: :D

Mk2
(grinning and ducking)
Well if it save me from swapping out a rod, why not!:D I know of no rule that says the launch lug can't be bigger than the rocket.
 

DRAGON64

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For A - C class rockets, I will use the 1/8" lugs that come with the kit...

For the cross-over rockets that use D - E BP motors I use large lugs (3/16") or buttons...I prefer the button over the lug for stability @ lift-off.

...but if rocket kits require a 1/4" lug or larger, my standard is to upgrade to buttons hands down.
 

Huge Blues

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I have been debating on trying my hand at one of the pop lug sustems. I have herd that their really good for scale and small rockets. though i am worried about issues with body damage
I would recommend checking out the wraparound style pop-lug found on the ContestRoc Yahoo Group. It will be found in the files section:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/contestRoc/

It's pretty much a scrap of body tube, elastic and two hooks. Make a couple, fly with many. I've made one flight with mine. It performed as advertised. Be sure to color it with a bright color so it stands out against brown terra firma.

Conventional builds will get a standoff unless it's not practical. Not so much to save the time intensive finish but to be ABLE to get at the lug from all angles.

Sorry for the lame shot. Too tired to fight with the camera.

Pop Lug.JPG
 

Chrisn

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you forgot to add the "all of the above" option

Edit: didn't notice it was multi choice, oops.
 

Daedalus

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I almost exclusively use rail buttins - I have a full size rail for HPR and a micro rail that uses linear buttons that are about 1/8" across and 1/4" long (it's actually made from caravan curtain rail) - I use this on anything from BT20 upwards and change over to the full size rail on anything over 38mm diameter.

I too hava a pop system almost exactly the same as Micros but instead of lugs it uses my micro rail for more positive guidance. I have used this on BT50 minimum diameter models and it works very well.

I only have standard lugs on my older models which were built before I made my micro rail and have never bothered to retrofit.
 

Daedalus

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I almost exclusively use rail buttins - I have a full size rail for HPR and a micro rail that uses linear buttons that are about 1/8" across and 1/4" long (it's actually made from caravan curtain rail) - I use this on anything from BT20 upwards and change over to the full size rail on anything over 38mm diameter.

I too hava a pop system almost exactly the same as Micros but instead of lugs it uses my micro rail for more positive guidance. I have used this on BT50 minimum diameter models and it works very well.

I only have standard lugs on my older models which were built before I made my micro rail and have never bothered to retrofit.
 

spacecadet

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I jsut do whatever seems to be the most inconspicuous when I get to the field and realize that I forgot to install them AGAIN.
That goes for me too. Although I usually remember just after I finish building.
Usually a couple of inches of drinking straw, in two sections if the body is cylindrical enough.
Although if it's a model like this, I may just drill a hole in it.

P9071833.JPG
 

Micromeister

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Charlaine:
I still think you needed another line on the Poll: "I use all the above, depending on model type being built".

However in most instances if a LL is going to be used two small lugs space apart one near the CG of the loaded model the other near the forward edge of the fins seems to give me the best overall performance and least obtrusiveness to whatever type models look.
I really believe if I could I'd probably always use a wire ring "antenna Loop" forward lug with a standard in the fin fillet as the ideal solution...when using lugs.
But for competition and High performance models pop lugs, Pistons or Tower launching are still preferred. The nice thing about flying Micros mostly is I can have all these options with me on the field ALL the time:)
 
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