Quantcast

Kname That Knife

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

Jackball74

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2009
Messages
385
Reaction score
1
A few years ago I acquired a pipe collection from a family friend who had passed away. It was housed in a wooden display case with a drawer filled with various smoking paraphernalia, but there was also an unusual pocketknife with two blades that taper to points.



It is a Kutmaster, but I'm not sure which model. I figure it was used to scrape the bowls of the pipes, but does anyone know if the blade shapes serve a specific purpose? There are knifes made for cleaning pipes, but the blades are blunted and there is usually a tamping tool attached.
 

blackjack2564

Crazy Jim's Gone Banana's
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
9,112
Reaction score
1,251
Location
Savannah Ga
I think I have the same knife, my grandfather gave it to me back in the 50's. I have a big box of old knives & beautiful straight razors.
He was a big Pipe smoker also.
The wedge shaped blade, he showed me was for boring/enlarging holes.He would use it to make holes in leather belts also.
He gave it to me for whittling/carving wood. That's why the other thin long blade I believe. [that's what we did with it]

Wether those statements are accurate, I don't know. It was just Grandpa passing skills on to his grandson.

It was also quite common for knives blades to be sharpened/ground to the point of oblivion, or re-shaped for specific purpose.
To this day I carry a pocket knife. I usually wear out the handles well before the blades.
 
Last edited:

Woody's Workshop

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 3, 2011
Messages
4,295
Reaction score
194
Location
Reed City, Michigan (Lower)
I found "THIS", if it helps

"THIS" too, but no info.

I think it is an old electricians knife that had it's blades worked over.
Send the pic to Kutmaster, see if they can ID it by the number.
I took it into my CAD to get a closer look but can't read the number.
Being numbered, it may be a military issued piece.
Was your family friend that handed the knife down in WWII or Korea?
 
Last edited:

hcmbanjo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
2,325
Reaction score
140
It was also quite common for knives blades to be sharpened/ground to the point of oblivion, or re-shaped for specific purpose.
To this day I carry a pocket knife. I usually wear out the handles well before the blades.
My Dad carried had few different knives but his old Buck two-blade was his everyday knife.
After many years of sharpening the blade was ground down to a point much like the first picture shows.

He sent it back to Buck to have the blade replaced.
A small package arrived with a few new replacement knives and a letter of thanks from the president of the Buck company.

I always carry a small Swiss Army knife. Both my daughters got the same knives for Christmas last year.
At first they gave me one of those "Really?" looks.
Now they use it everyday. Whether it's the scissors, tweezers, fingernail file or knife.
They let me know it's one of the most useful gifts they ever received.
 

Jackball74

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2009
Messages
385
Reaction score
1
It does look like an electrician's knife. Man did he do some some sharpening!
 

cavecentral

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Messages
3,129
Reaction score
25
It does look like an electrician's knife. Man did he do some some sharpening!
I've seen some old timers with knives where the blade was down to X-Acto like size. Must've sharpened it often and owned it most of their lives.
 

Jackball74

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2009
Messages
385
Reaction score
1
Interesting you mentioned this - my uncle had an old Buck that had a blade with an X-Acto shape to it...
 

Peartree

Cyborg Rocketeer
Staff member
Administrator
Global Mod
Joined
Jan 6, 2009
Messages
5,361
Reaction score
846
Location
Alliance, Ohio
I've seen some old timers with knives where the blade was down to X-Acto like size. Must've sharpened it often and owned it most of their lives.
My Mom has a kitchen paring knife that she got from her parents that has been sharpened so many times it's probably half the length it used to be, and more than a little oddly shaped. Still the sharpest knife in the drawer though. Grandpa was a WW1 vet and a skilled tradesman. His knives were always sharp and his tools were always clean and lightly oiled.
 

rharshberger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2014
Messages
9,795
Reaction score
1,766
Location
Pasco, WA
I have my Grandfather and Grandmother's knives, one a 3 blade Old Timer and the other is a small 2 blade Old Timer. Both are made by Case iirc. At tge same time I inherited Great Grandpa's WW1 era H.Boker straight razor. The whetstone used to sharpen the knives actually has a .25" deep by 1.5" depression worn into it and is mounted on a handle.
 
Top