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tdn

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My girlfriend recently designed and built her first rocket. She had no plans to fly it, but was instead intending to send it to her 3-year-old nephew for Christmas. She figured that in a few years, with the help of his parents, he could fly it himself.

But for some reason, she brought it to our launch last weekend. Silly ol' evil me, I talked her into giving one short inaugural flight. It turned out to be quite a performer. On a simple A8-3, it went up, and up, and up...

...and away. I heard the pop of the ejection charge, but never saw it again. My girlfriend swears she saw it go over a row of trees, across a parking lot, and behind a nursing home. But her search turned up nothing. All she found, to her dismay, was a fast-moving stream.

Looks like she's going to have to build a new one really fast.

Saddened, I decided that the day was going to get only one more launch, as we'd been otherwise lucky, and I didn't want to temp fate.

So I set off my prized Tall Boy with a B6-6, expecting to a glorious flight and an easy recovery. The launch was indeed spectacular. As it reached apogee, my girlfriend exclaimed "How come your rockets always go up straight and come down straight? They always come down straight. Hey! Come down straight!"

We watched as it drifted off the field -- in the opposite direction from where we lost the other rocket. Gotta love New England weather. It went past some trees, and it appeared to come down in some guy's front yard. My girlfriend went off in search of it, and turned up nothing. She even ventured to go into the guy's yard a little. Nothing.

But dang if I'm going to lose two in one day, especially my favorite. So I made the search myself. I even went so far as to trespass into the guy's back yard. Nothing.

Resigning myself to my loss, I left his lawn, shaking my head, letting my eyes drift to his roof. Ah, his roof! Looky what I found!

Now normally I'm a pretty shy person. I barely talk to my coworkers when critical work-realted issues come up. So it was way out of my character to ring the doorbell of a complete stranger whose property I was trespassing on.

Far from chasing me off with a shotgun, he said "Eh, I'm tired of watching BC lose anyway. Let me get my brother-in-law's ladder." He then went up on his own roof to retrieve my precious. And he was full of curiosity. "How often do you do this? How high do they go? Is this cool or what?"

Other than his violent toss off the roof (which broke a fin in two), he was very pleasant to deal with. I suspect most people wouldn't have gone outside, on a cold day, in their pajamas, to climb on their roofs to recover a toy for a complete stranger.

Dude, whoever you are, I thank you. You are most cool.
 

BobH48

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I see you're from Boston. I'm from MA also (get a map of Nowhere, find the middle, and that's where I live).

Do you have a club that you launch with? Must be getting chilly out there.
 

tdn

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Originally posted by BobH48
I see you're from Boston. I'm from MA also (get a map of Nowhere, find the middle, and that's where I live).

Do you have a club that you launch with? Must be getting chilly out there.
No club, though my girlfriend and I call ourselves CASA -- the Commonwealth Ave. Space Agency. Her living room, where we build models is CPL -- CASA Propulsion Laboratories. And we launch at Cape Canton -- Canton High School, which has a field big enough to set off fireworks every 7/4. :D

Other than CMASS, I'm not aware of any clubs around here.
 

Chuck Rudy

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Originally posted by tdn

Other than his violent toss off the roof (which broke a fin in two), he was very pleasant to deal with. I suspect most people wouldn't have gone outside, on a cold day, in their pajamas, to climb on their roofs to recover a toy for a complete stranger.
The damage may have been quite a bit less from his toss than it might have been coming down the roof one handed, sliding and sitting on the rocket. Even though there was a little fix involved it was undoubtedly the safest thing for the stranger to do, especially in his jammies. ;-)
 

BobH48

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Originally posted by Chuck Rudy
The damage may have been quite a bit less from his toss than it might have been coming down the roof one handed, sliding and sitting on the rocket. Even though there was a little fix involved it was undoubtedly the safest thing for the stranger to do, especially in his jammies. ;-)
I agree with that.

A couple of years ago I was on a ladder on the porch roof adjusting the satelite dish and the ladder went out from under me. I fell about 14 feet onto the porch roof, slid down the porch roof and over the edge, and landed in a rose garden.

I had taken all the force of both falls on the bottom of my feet and I couldn't walk on them for a couple of weeks. They were badly sprained and took almost two years to fully heal.

They still bother me in cold, wet weather so I urge everyone to be extra careful when going up on rooftops.
 

Chuck Rudy

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Originally posted by BobH48
I agree with that.

A couple of years ago I was on a ladder on the porch roof adjusting the satelite dish and the ladder went out from under me. I fell about 14 feet onto the porch roof, slid down the porch roof and over the edge, and landed in a rose garden.

.
Owwww.....I'd only fallen 6 feet from a sliding collapsing ladder and broke two ribs.......monor injuries are so painful especially when you only want to fall asleep. I feel your pain.......
 
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