Quantcast

I'm buying a new drill press. What about a drill press table?

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

OverTheTop

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Messages
4,887
Reaction score
2,131
Location
Melbourne Australia
I don't think it would have ever been greately useful for me. Having said that you tend to use what you have so it may have merit.

I have a full-height floor standing drill press which is great. Got the one with a crank on the table to help with the changing height on the table. I would recommend both the full height and the crank. The full height has managed to get some very big work pieces under the drill.

YMMV.
 

michigander

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2012
Messages
1,822
Reaction score
0
press shows out of stock

the table I use 3/4" plywood , and replace as needed from drill marks
 

rharshberger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2014
Messages
9,793
Reaction score
1,764
Location
Pasco, WA
I use a homemade drill press table made from mdf, it has a fairly large hole drilled in it for bit clearances and dust collection, I have made clamp-on fences and v-blocks.

As for Grizzly products I own several and have been pleased with all of them.
 

Woody's Workshop

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 3, 2011
Messages
4,294
Reaction score
191
Location
Reed City, Michigan (Lower)
I don't know how much you want to spend on a drill press.
I've been looking at "THIS" type of machine for several reasons.
Slitting BT's, Fin edge beveling, Custom Nose Cones, etc.
And there is many things you can add as accessories to even more things.
You can get a X & Y axis cross sliding vise to put on the drill press for about $50.
Problem with them is it takes more to set them up.
I looked into a Smithy Machine, but reviews seam to point to the new machines don't compare to the older one's in quality and performance.
 

OverTheTop

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Messages
4,887
Reaction score
2,131
Location
Melbourne Australia
I have a mill as well as the drill-press.

Millresize.JPG

A mill-drill as suggested by WW might be good for you. As long as you are not chasing single-digit micron accuracy you can probably pick one up for not many dollars. Down here they are about 1/3 the cost of a full knee mill. They don't take up a huge amount of workspace like a full-blown mill either. It would open up many more possibilities for rocketry.

Keep an open mind if the budget allows it. Remember you might spend the next n decades wishing you had got one! I suspect if you get one you will wonder how you ever did without it.
 

tomsteve

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2014
Messages
894
Reaction score
257
the only thing i dont like about that table is the mdf. it falls apart easy.before building mine i read a few people say the t rails ended up falling off. a few people pulled the rails,scuffed em up, and epoxied them down. i built one from a 2' by 4' 3/4" ply for a little less. i was able to make a pile of replacement inserts for it,too, out of the ply. i havent used the fence for anything rocketry and only a couple times building furniture.
aaaaand i cant get a picture of it to upload
 

hobie1dog

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2009
Messages
4,064
Reaction score
461
I don't know how much you want to spend on a drill press.
I've been looking at "THIS" type of machine for several reasons.
Slitting BT's, Fin edge beveling, Custom Nose Cones, etc.
And there is many things you can add as accessories to even more things.
You can get a X & Y axis cross sliding vise to put on the drill press for about $50.
Problem with them is it takes more to set them up.
I looked into a Smithy Machine, but reviews seam to point to the new machines don't compare to the older one's in quality and performance.
Looks perfect if it's affordable to the OP
 

Zeus-cat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
4,593
Reaction score
800
I think I will pass on the drill press table as I already had my doubts about it. Thanks for the advice. If I need an expanded work surface I can make one with plywood.

I am aware that the drill press is out of stock.
 

dave carver

....what hump?
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
4,973
Reaction score
5
Location
Idaho
If you can swing it I'd add my 2 cents for the mill. It can do something a drill press does badly and that's mill. You take a bit sideways through some work and the first hint of chatter will knock the chuck loose. The mill is a drill press so that part is covered, It's the milling that holds so much promise, long carbide cutter making knife edge fins that are identical...mmmmm ;)
 

KarlS

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Messages
307
Reaction score
4
If you can afford it, go for the mill. It will do so much more.
 

soopirV

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2010
Messages
1,157
Reaction score
6
I don't know how much you want to spend on a drill press.
I've been looking at "THIS" type of machine for several reasons.
Slitting BT's, Fin edge beveling, Custom Nose Cones, etc.
And there is many things you can add as accessories to even more things.
You can get a X & Y axis cross sliding vise to put on the drill press for about $50.
Problem with them is it takes more to set them up.
I looked into a Smithy Machine, but reviews seam to point to the new machines don't compare to the older one's in quality and performance.
Did you pull the trigger on this? Has anyone? I am leery because isn't Northerntool a lot like Harbor freight in terms of quality? I bought a bench top drill press from HF that I wouldn't even trust to anchor a row boat, hence my desire to buy a new (higher quality but not crazy expensive) press. Currently leaning towards the WEN 12" (great reviews online), but the OPs link to Grizzly has got me looking at the 12 speed bench top they offer- more expensive, but I'm sure higher quality. Hadn't thought of a mill as an option because I know nothing about using one, but if it's as multipurpose as suggested, it would be worth looking at. What all can you do with a mill for rocketry, in addition to what WW mentioned above?
-cut fin slots
-cut centering rings?
-machine thrust plates and stepped bulkheads?
-can you machine ex casings or is this (and perhaps the two above) for a lathe?
 

soopirV

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2010
Messages
1,157
Reaction score
6
Did you pull the trigger on this? Has anyone? I am leery because isn't Northerntool a lot like Harbor freight in terms of quality? I bought a bench top drill press from HF that I wouldn't even trust to anchor a row boat, hence my desire to buy a new (higher quality but not crazy expensive) press. Currently leaning towards the WEN 12" (great reviews online), but the OPs link to Grizzly has got me looking at the 12 speed bench top they offer- more expensive, but I'm sure higher quality. Hadn't thought of a mill as an option because I know nothing about using one, but if it's as multipurpose as suggested, it would be worth looking at. What all can you do with a mill for rocketry, in addition to what WW mentioned above?
-cut fin slots
-cut centering rings?
-machine thrust plates and stepped bulkheads?
-can you machine ex casings or is this (and perhaps the two above) for a lathe?
Answered most of my own questions above by having a bit more time to look into it...anything round would require a rotary table, which about doubles the cost (at least in my first searches), so I would probably be better off getting a separate lathe. Still curious, however, if it was purchased by anyone?
 

Zeus-cat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
4,593
Reaction score
800
I am the OP and I have not pulled the trigger. I watched a video on the Grizzly site that discussed the freight process. Freight is $89, but if I don't have a forklift at my house to unload it from the truck (I don't have a forklift), I either need to pick it up at the freight terminal or pay an additional $34 so that they put it on a truck with a lift gate. However, They will not drive up my driveway as the freight companies do not want to be liable for damage to the driveways. So for the additional $34 they would drop it at the end of my rather long and sloping driveway.

Furthermore, the video cautioned that they may not deliver on unimproved roads (I live on a private, unimproved road), or roads that do not allow the freight truck to turn around (the road dead ends with no way to turn around).

I am planning on calling them and finding out where the freight terminal is located and how the unit breaks down. A buddy has a pickup so I could go get it. However, once I get it I have to get it downstairs. I'd like to know how heavy the pieces are.

Sadly, the same model comes in a bench top version, but without the laser and the digital readout.

So, still looking and pondering.
 

warnerr

Lifetime Supporter
TRF Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 4, 2011
Messages
360
Reaction score
44
wild overreaction on shipping warnings. I would know... i live in in a remote area down a steep 1/4 mile dirt road. i have had many machine deliveries. it is easiest with liftgate truck for small items- say 800# class. Big rigs have managed to get down here- these guys are amazing- 40ft trailers down this tiny road!!!! That is how my 12" lathe was delivered. I have a loader with forks for unloading. My heaviest delivery was a 42" kondia mill- the machinery moving truck couldn't stop and was sliding coming down the dirt road so i took my loader up the hill to unload. that thing is heavy!!! I have even had the metal delivered for a 50 ft barn right to location. I consider the machine your considering light- suggest tailgate delivery. don't worry about not coming down your driveway- those delivery guys are pros- the company just states they don't have to take it all the way.... they will if at all possible. They are overplaying the delivery issue.... don't worry, enjoy your new investment.
 

rharshberger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2014
Messages
9,793
Reaction score
1,764
Location
Pasco, WA
Most of my Grizzly tools have not come assembled, so breaking down the package is reasonable. The unit will probably come as the head unit with or without the motor mounted, the motor (if not mounted), the base, the table, and the pillar (drawing a blank on the tubes actual name). Depending on which unit you get the parts mostly will be less than 100lbs each for a normal sized drill press (read as bench top to smaller floor stand models). My 500lb table saw came as 1 pallet of 2 boxes one was the base and one was the table and accessories, it was easy to unload from the freight truck into the back of my pickup then off to the ground. The G0794 is only 171 lbs shipping weight, total assembled weight is 150ish lbs just over half will be the head unit and motor.
 
Last edited:
Top