I'll Worry When; "It's The Size Of Texas Mr. President".

ThirstyBarbarian

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Only if you could watch from, say, Venus or somewhere similarly far away.

About 10 years ago I was at the National Air and Space museum in Washington DC and they had a cool animation of the impact and formation of the moon. You watched it reclined in a lounge seat, and it was projected on a dome above you. Pretty cool.
 

boomtube-mk2

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I wish to express my heartfelt gratitude for the well-reasoned replies to my post regarding the relative sizes of the Chicxulub asteroid
Who cares about what unit of measurement's are used or the relative size of the asteroid to Earth.
First, try coming-up with a name for it that people can actually pronounce!!
 

boomtube-mk2

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My only problem with the "Impact Theory" of the Moon's formation is that it reads too much like Velikovsky.
 
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boatgeek

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A good way to begin to get used to metric-denominated lengths is to learn one’s own height in centimetres (for example, 175 cm which equals 1.75 m). Then, as you go about your day’s business, you can compare your height to objects nearby. Or as rocketeers, we always have our rockets in mind. So for the person who is 1.75 m tall, a two-metre rocket is a bit taller than they are, and a rocket that measures one-and-a-half metres in length is a bit shorter than they are.

Be careful--that path leads to the Smoot! I regularly estimate sizes at work using cubits and great spans. Knowing that my cubit is about 20" and my span is about 9" makes it easy to check that installed structure matches drawings without busting out a measuring tape.
 

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