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CoyoteNumber2

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The program for this flight was to launch vertical, turn immediately to a 15° tilt (at a bearing of 0°), change to a bearing of 20° at 6.2 seconds (still at 15°), and then go back to vertical at 12.2 seconds.
Is 0° relative to the rocket's heading at launch? Or relative to 0° due north?

Badass stuff, by the way.
 

JimJarvis50

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Is 0° relative to the rocket's heading at launch? Or relative to 0° due north?

Badass stuff, by the way.
It's 0° relative to the initial position of the rocket on the pad. The control system doesn't have a compass. I just say north/south so that the flight is easier to visualize.

Jim
 

JimJarvis50

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Well, Crap! I flew my stabilized rocket over the weekend at the TNT Texas Shootout. This flight was in the two-stage configuration. It was a K2050 in the booster to get things moving followed by an L395 long-burn motor in the sustainer. The sustainer didn't light (it spit the igniter due to mostly operator error). It was going to be a fun flight, too. Here's a video clip of the flight, such as it was. Also, here's a video clip of the flight program. I'll leave it as an exercise for the reader to figure out what we were up to. The good news is that everything recovered just fine - just have to glue various fins back on the rocket - so I'll try it again before too long.

Jim


 

Finicky

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Awesome attempt Jim. When in doubt, add more pyrogen :)

Sorry if you've been asked this before, but what camera are you using ?? I love the torpedo shape.

Jim Jarvis Rocket.jpg
 

WoShuGui

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Is the sustainer fin can rotating Independent of the airframe?
 

JimJarvis50

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Is the sustainer fin can rotating Independent of the airframe?
Yes, it's one of my two spin cans. The purpose of them is to avoid "control reversal". The canards on the top of the rocket can cause voticies that hit the lower fins and turn the rocket in the wrong direction. The spin can prevents that. This video shows the design.

Jim

 

jmwoody

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Howdy Jim

Thank you for joining us and flying your great rockets at the TNT Texas Shootout this past weekend. I had the pleasure and honor to RSO your rocket Saturday ... very cool sir .... well done! I'm looking forward to visiting with you again at our next launch

John
 

JimJarvis50

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Howdy Jim

Thank you for joining us and flying your great rockets at the TNT Texas Shootout this past weekend. I had the pleasure and honor to RSO your rocket Saturday ... very cool sir .... well done! I'm looking forward to visiting with you again at our next launch

John
Thanks John. I think the Shootout is only going to grow over time. It's great that TNT has two good fields now.

So, the stabilized flight didn't go quite as planned, but the two-stager that you laid hands on did a bit better.

Jim

 

Arpak

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Thanks John. I think the Shootout is only going to grow over time. It's great that TNT has two good fields now.

So, the stabilized flight didn't go quite as planned, but the two-stager that you laid hands on did a bit better.

Jim

Details! What motors? 😄
 

JimJarvis50

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Details! What motors? 😄
This was just my well-worn purple two-stager. Has probably a couple dozen flights on it - built maybe 15 years ago - but it just keeps coming back. It can fly up to 25K with maximum motors, but this flight was just a J-760 to I-120 to around 6K. Very pretty flight though.

The last time I flew the rocket was back in June 2020, also at Seymour. The sustainer motor cato'd, so that part of the rocket was rebuilt prior to this flight. I"ve had it prepped for months, but we haven't had a suitable day to fly it, so I took it to the Shootout.

Jim

vlcsnap-2021-06-06-14h32m00s312.png
 

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