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How to Learn HPR Techniques

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bmhiii

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I want to learn about HPR techniques like altimeters, payloads, dual deployment, etc. I plan on practicing some of these techniques in LPR and MPR. Is there a book or two that I can get to learn from? If so, where can I buy them?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Barry
 

Missileman

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I started with a book called Modern High Power Rocketry.
Cant remember the authers name off hand but I bought it from Amazon.com
Saturn press has alot of rocketry related publications as well.
If you have any specific questions search this forum or just ask.
Best of luck
Jim
 

Missileman

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What Astrowolf67 said.
I hit the post buttom at the same time LOL
It is a great book and I learned alot from it.
 

astrowolf67

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Hmm, great minds think alike! :)

I do plan to get the book, just haven't done it yet. Glad to hear from first hand experience it'll be a good investment.
 

llickteig1

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G. Harry Stine's book, The Handbook of Model Rocketry is still a good resource. Even though many of the photos are outdated, most of the technical parts still hold. Some of MPR and HPR is simply applying the solid technical concepts upward in a bigger way. The book previously mentioned is good, too.

Additionally, go to a major regional HPR rocket launch and pay attention. For you, THOR or KLOUDBusters are within 3-4 hours and worth checking out. See what the big boys are doing and figure out which techniques you want to learn. There are lots of rockets of all sizes flown at large launches.

Then wander around the prep area and pay attention to the size and type of rockets or capability you want to emulate. Politely introduce yourself and ask the person(s) there, "Do you mind if I watch you prep your rocket for a few minutes?" Then watch how the rockets are prepped and how they're built. If you want to understand more about what is going on, ask, "Do you mind answering a few questions?" Ask a few questions, but don't be a pest. If the person is prepping electronics, try to hold your questions while he's concentrating on that part.

Don't try to learn it all at once. Take some ideas back with you and look them up on ROL InfoCentral (http://www.info-central.org/infocentral.shtml).

I have found that most rocketeers like to share their knowledge and design/construction ideas and techniques. Rocket people are friendly and helpful. If you don't understand how or why something is done a certain way, just ask.

HTH, --Lance.
 

cls

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... Lance has the right idea: get out and talk to people and look at what they've done and what works & not.

personally, I am not impressed by the MHPR book. Specifically, it does not cover very well the things you asked about! payloads, altimeters, dual deployment. there is a small section about altimeters but it's not very well done and it is old. (who uses an Olsen anymore?)

but you should probably buy a copy 'cos it's all we got for HPR.


other sources of info will cover most HPR topics better:

- right here in TRF (don't hesitate to ask questions! and post pix! and don't forget the search feature.)

- ROL & InfoCentral

- get out and watch some launches and talk to people. most rocketeers will talk your ears off if you ask them anything!
 

jetra2

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I agree with cls about MHPR. I requested it from the library with high hopes of it being a very good book, but I was disappointed when I finally got the book. It's not exactly in Layman's terms, but it's too simple for the serious HPR rocketeer. It has a lot of pictures, too many if you had to ask me. I'd prefer to see more diagrams and calculations that we can use, along with more in-depth techniques, such as really demonstrating how to fiberglass correctly and get a smooth surface, without bumps or bubbles.

Anyways, the book is worth picking up, but don't go into expecting really deep and technical information, or to use it as a reference. It's a good casual read for those looking to get into MPR or jump from MPR to HPR, but it's not something you'd study or look to when you want to learn a complex technique.

Jason
 

Missileman

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I am sorry but I have to jump in here.
MHPR does not contain highly technical info that is true but you are missing the point.
MHPR covers the basics of HPR and when a person, like myself,
that is completely new to HPR reads it, there is an aweful lot of info I found helpful.
This IMO is a good place to start.
G. Harry Stine, Hanbook of Model Rocketry is also a great reference. Although it does not really cover HPR very well it does cover Rocketry principles that hold true fom micro model rockets all the way through the largest NASA rockets.
The best source by far are people already flying HPR.
Attend some launches and ask around.
 

jetra2

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You are completely correct, missileman. I totally forgot about that point, and I apologize.

Jason
 

Ray Dunakin

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I highly recommend the InfoCentral site at Rocketry Online. Lots and lots of good info there about all aspects of high power rocketry.
 

Chilly

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Ditto ROL/InfoCentral. In fact I made my own "book" from there by pasting a lot of the pages into Word for printouts. It's probably as good a resource as MHPR and free. I learned an awful lot from just surfing the 'net. Of course, there's no substitute for going to launches and getting your hands dirty.

Other excellent resources:
www.apogeerockets.com - excellent e-zine newsletter. Mostly LPR but there are some good primers on AP motors and electronics.
www.publicmissiles.com - good printable summaries of electronics, altimeters, staging, etc.
www.jcrocket.com - John Coker's website. LOTS of info.
www.vatsaas.org/rtv - Rocket Team Vatsaas. More good info and hands-down the funniest rocketry site on the web!
 

swimmer

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bmhii, (Barry)

I've seen your rocket fleet and watched you fly and you will have no problem with MPR/HPR.

These guys gave you some great advise. Let me add one thing, to start, if you are not comfortable scratchbuilding, buy youself a good kit that is HPR capable. Follow the directions to a "T". Fly it on some MPR motors then use it for your L1 cert. By that time there won't be any stopping you.

Oh yeah, join a good club. I've got a recommendation but you already know what it is.

and, stick around TRF.
 
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