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How do you guys use Aerogloss sanding sealer?

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AfterBurners

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I've been using this for awhile.

20160613_181107.jpg

Its a love/hate thing. Sometimes I like the results and other times I don't. I let it dry I sand it and then I get a plastic like finish. I guess that's normal? Sometimes though it leaves blemishes like it didn't sand level. Sometimes I would apply a few coats. Let dry the required time and sand and repeat.

What I like using now is the Balsa Filler Primer. Just got this jar in the mail today.

20160613_181138.jpg

Looks like Aerogloss changed the label design.:) I really like this stuff. Dries fast and sands like butter and the finish is smooth as silk. Reading the label, which was a long time ago, but as I recall you would use this first and then follow it with the sanding sealer.

So how do you guys prefer to use these products? Do you use one or other or do you use them both together?

Just curious and maybe looking for some new finishing techniques.
 

aerostadt

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I used Aerogloss years ago and I liked the results, but seemed it like I had to put on coat after coat before I got a good finish.
 

RocketFeller

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I like to use Elmer's Carpenter's Wood Filler followed by the Aerogloss sanding sealer. The CWF is odorless and easy to sand, so I can do that at the kitchen table. Once I get them relatively smooth, one or two coats of sanding sealer finishes them up nicely and toughens the surface compared to just CWF.
 

AfterBurners

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I like to use Elmer's Carpenter's Wood Filler followed by the Aerogloss sanding sealer. The CWF is odorless and easy to sand, so I can do that at the kitchen table. Once I get them relatively smooth, one or two coats of sanding sealer finishes them up nicely and toughens the surface compared to just CWF.
I use thin CA on balsa nose cones works great!

That's a neat technique you use. So when you use the sanding sealer do you actually sand it or just brush it on and let it dry.
 
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RocketFeller

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I use thin CA on balsa nose cones works great!

That's a neat technique you use. So when you use the sanding sealer do you actually sand it or just brush it on and let it dry.
I apply the CWF with a putty knife first. I like to use quite a bit of pressure to force the CWF into the grain. After I apply the sanding sealer I will sand it lightly with fine grit, it doesn't take much.

I agree, for NCs thin CA works great for hardening the surface so you don't sand things out of shape.
 

Micromeister

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Back in the stone age 70's to mid 80's I used a lot of Pactra Aerogloss (Now Midwest) Balsa Filler on just about all my standard and Up-Scale LPR & MPR Clustered models.

Aerogloss Sanding sealer is just that a SEALER. it has very little "filler" solids with which to fill balsa grain. It does however do a very nice job of Sealing the porous balsa surface in preperation for two or three coats of Balsa Filler (which has LOTS of solids to fill Grain and body seams).

All that said: I haven't used much of this product in the last couple decades as I've found using CHEAP, Grey, Brown or Black Auto primer (not necessarally high build primer). Does exactly the same job without most of the smell and far less work time to get babies butt smooth model finishes. I'm currently using ColorPlace (walmart) Grey Auto primer on just about all my model construction MMX, LPR & MPR.

Using CHEAP Prime there is a Method to the madness: Its called the "3-Coat method". which means: Spray 3 wet coats of primer on the entire model, giving each coat about 5 minutes to tac between coats. After the third coat is applied let the model sit overnight to a week (Humidity dependent) until the primer is (Sniff Test) dry cured. (Sniff Test = with nose on the surface of the model NO paint or thinner smells can be detected). Once sniff test cured; DRY sand with 240 - 320 sandpaper until the model is completely smooth or paper or wood are encountered. If sanded to bare paper or wood, repeat Priming with another 3 coats until all grain and body seam lines are filled. Our models are then ready for color coats.
Over the past decade or so I don't think i've had to add additional primer beyond the first 3 coat application more the 3 or 4 time on very deep Balsa grain.
At .88 to 1.29 per 12oz can. I usually get two or three standard size models from a single ColorPlace Primer can. So I believe is ends up being a bit cheaper then Balsa Filler in the long run as will as less smelly:) Oh sure! if you want to spend the extra money for Primer that is to be sanded off anyway then Dupli-Color or Rustoleum High build primers are fine (at 6+ bucks a can). I simply can not justify the cost difference, compared to the over all work time between Hight build (still takes at least 2 coats sometimes 3) and the cheaper, Thinner (less heavy solids) Standard sandable Grey Auto primers.

I've used ColorPlace Auto Primer under: Old formula Krylon, Testors, Color Works, Sherwin Williams, many varients of Rustoleum, Dupli-Color and lot of off brand rattle can spray paints without any compatibility problem as long as the Primer is allowed to completely cure. Remember the Sniff Test!.

Hope this helps a little.

ColorPlace-a_Cheap Grey Primer(Wal-Mart) _01-12.jpg


Balsa Filler 70-4-sm_3oz jars Pactra & Midwest_03-26-07.jpg


View attachment Rustoleum-a_Std and HUGE nozzles_05-08-09.JPG
 

bob jablonski

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I use 3-4 coats of Aerogloss (sanding between coats) on balsa for nice results. On a side note I don't know how much longer you can buy it as Midwest dosnt have it on there web site any more. so when the distributor pipe line dryes up that may be the end of Aerogloss
 

AfterBurners

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So Micro when you used the Aerogloss you used the sanding sealer first and then the Balsa Filler Primer over that? I always thought the process was reverse of that? Just saying...that's I have this thread up. I wonder if it matters much?
 

BRS Hobbies

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My understanding is the Balsa Fillercoat is used first and then the Sanding Sealer. Perhaps you could experiment both ways and use the way that works the best for you. I have been using just the Sanding Sealer but still end up with some balsa grain showing so think the Balsa Fillercoat should be used at some point.

Best regards,
Brian
 

Micromeister

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My understanding is the Balsa Fillercoat is used first and then the Sanding Sealer. Perhaps you could experiment both ways and use the way that works the best for you. I have been using just the Sanding Sealer but still end up with some balsa grain showing so think the Balsa Fillercoat should be used at some point.

Best regards,
Brian
Yeap! I found when using Sanding Sealer it did a much better job of SEALING the balsa Grain with a single coat BEFORE using the balsa filler to fill the grain.
Using a sealer even Minwax Wood Hardener before trying to fill the grain can reduce the number of coats from 3-4 to 2 or 3. In several decades of use I don't recall having any negative result using the process.

I'd really like to know where people get the idea using a sanding sealer should be used over the filler.. makes no sense at all.

If you think about it a little it really doesn't make much sense to fill and sand the grain with balsa filler then use a sealer over it before applying Paint which needs the matte surface "Tooth" to help with paint adhesion.
 
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AfterBurners

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worse case scenario read the instructions which I am going search for now BRB

This is what I found. I found it on Hobbylinc's website

Flammable: Contains toluol and methyl ethyl keytone.
•As with any type of painting procedure, always test for compatibility of materials on a scrap piece before attempting to paint model.
•For best results: 1. Sand entire model until smooth surface is obtained by using progressively coarse to fine sandpaper.
• 2. Fill in any surface irregularities with Aero-Gloss Balsa
• Fillercoat Primer.
• 3. Stir Sanding Sealer thoroughly. Apply as many coats as required
• with a full brush to obtain smooth surface. Sand between coats
• using tack rag to wipe away dust.
• 4. Dry 72 hours before paint application. Topcoat Sanding Sealer
• with Formula U or Aero-Gloss Dopes.

See link http://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/mid/mid71-1.htm

I just realized it states its been discontinued
 
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Daddyisabar

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I see you can still buy SIG Sealer directly on the internet, up to gallon sizes. Like the Old California Coolers from the early eighties, I like the stuff with lots of suspended solids! By '85 all the Coolers were gone from the shelves, never to be seen again, only to be replaced with the horror that was Bartels and Jaymes. Imagine the horror when the SIG bottles disappeared from my Hobby Lobby shelf, no more dope at Hobby Lobby! Thanks goodness for the internet, I can still get SIG, and still a few bottles of Aero Gloss at one hobby store in town. That first coat just gets sucked right into the balsa, just like that first Cooler would go down real easy back in the day. I would just glop on sealer coats two and three, sanding in between of course. Just like I would glop down Coolers two and three back in High School, while playing volleyball in the sand pit. Oh those good old days, lots of sanding sealer and then more sanding for a perfect finish.
 

AfterBurners

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