Horizontal Spin Recovery - with Magnus Effect?

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Dotini

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We had a superb morning launch session today at 60 Acres. Clear skies and 3-5 mph winds prevailed throughout the session. First we launched an Estes scale Patriot on a C5-3 (394'), then two members of the Prontosaurus family with the 55/E12-6 attaining 1,692', and finally two Magnus effect models.

The repaired Magnus X-6/C11-3 once again took off for the next county, gliding 663' straight south with a disappointing descent time of only about 20 seconds.

The new Magnus X-7 was launched on three motors, B4-4, B6-4 and C6-5. All good, but the latter flight was most interesting! After just barely beginning to go ballistic after apogee, the ejection event commenced an immediate rapid horizontal spin. A new record 45+ seconds were consumed as the model then slowly spiraled down to within 200' of the launch pad!! This is what it's all about, my friends.

After I get rested up and organized, more data, photos and video are to come.
 

lakeroadster

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We had a superb morning launch session today at 60 Acres. Clear skies and 3-5 mph winds prevailed throughout the session. First we launched an Estes scale Patriot on a C5-3 (394'), then two members of the Prontosaurus family with the 55/E12-6 attaining 1,692', and finally two Magnus effect models.

The repaired Magnus X-6/C11-3 once again took off for the next county, gliding 663' straight south with a disappointing descent time of only about 20 seconds.

The new Magnus X-7 was launched on three motors, B4-4, B6-4 and C6-5. All good, but the latter flight was most interesting! After just barely beginning to go ballistic after apogee, the ejection event commenced an immediate rapid horizontal spin. A new record 45+ seconds were consumed as the model then slowly spiraled down to within 200' of the launch pad!! This is what it's all about, my friends.

After I get rested up and organized, more data, photos and video are to come.

45 seconds... :shocked:

Congratulations... you've certainly earned it.
 

Jerry F.

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We had a superb morning launch session today at 60 Acres. Clear skies and 3-5 mph winds prevailed throughout the session.
With your side ports to get the effect started, have you tried to add a hood or something to direct the gases to “kickstart” the spin by blowing the gases out of the side and encouraging the spin...??? Just spitballing here...
 

lakeroadster

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With your side ports to get the effect started, have you tried to add a hood or something to direct the gases to “kickstart” the spin by blowing the gases out of the side and encouraging the spin...??? Just spitballing here...

Dual exhaust headers... on a rocket. Sweet.
 

Dotini

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With your side ports to get the effect started, have you tried to add a hood or something to direct the gases to “kickstart” the spin by blowing the gases out of the side and encouraging the spin...??? Just spitballing here...
Last year we experimented briefly with such a concept. It worked! However, we were at such an early stage in the overall program that we set the advanced concept aside for the moment and haven't gotten back to it yet. We encourage further experimentation.

Edit: the X-7 rocket began strongly spinning at the moment of launch solely by virtue of the folded fins.
DSC00624.jpg
Early experiment with utilizing multiple exhaust ports to initiate spin on a BT-50 model.
 
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Dotini

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I've begun my latest in the Magnus X series. It will be BT-50 packing a D12-5 or D12-7 motor, painted black and fluorescent pink for visibility. Design improvements include increasing its tendency to spiral rather than glide in a fixed direction. The goal is a 1000' apogee with a 1 minute descent landing within 250' of the pad.

DSC00626.jpg
Fins manufactured from raw stock in ~15 minutes ready to install and finish. Fins are 1.5" x 2" x 0.020", weighing 0.20 oz. per set of 4. Material is PETG cut from commercial 3" thin wall shipping tube.
 

BABAR

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I've begun my latest in the Magnus X series. It will be BT-50 packing a D12-5 or D12-7 motor, painted black and fluorescent pink for visibility. Design improvements include increasing its tendency to spiral rather than glide in a fixed direction. The goal is a 1000' apogee with a 1 minute descent landing within 250' of the pad.

View attachment 513663
Fins manufactured from raw stock in ~15 minutes ready to install and finish. Fins are 1.5" x 2" x 0.020", weighing 0.20 oz. per set of 4. Material is PETG cut from commercial 3" thin wall shipping tube.
Nice. You may find a durability advantage with these. The rocket will still come in spinning with a ton of rotational kinetic energy that has to go somewhere, but the curves and flexibility and the DIRECTION of rotation may allow this to dissipate much less jarringly than your fixed angled fins, in fact it may actually bounce!

looking forward to build and flight, as always.
 

Dotini

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We have a some developing news to report in the little world of HSR - Horizontal Spin Recovery.

1) The collaborator of my little team, another retired Boeing engineer, is building a novel HSR rocket with an interchangeable fin can, separable from the main body tube and motor mount. This will enable rapid experimentation with a variety of fin sizes, shapes and configurations.

2) Even more exciting, we are teaming up with another small team of retired Boeing engineers who fly a substantial fleet of RC aircraft and drones. We plan on aerial photography sessions at 60 Acres to video and study at close range the full flight and particularly the blow-over events of HSR rockets.
 

Dotini

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You know it’s a long rocket when you need TWO stands to display it!
Well, you know me, mister belt-and-suspenders has a habit of being cautious!
Actually, this model is the most rigid, straight and strong 50:1 design I've made yet. I've replaced the usual Apogee coupler to join the two Apogee tubes. Instead, I've used the Rocketarium coupler. It is much stiffer and of slightly higher diameter, making for a very nice tight fit. I also use a second such coupler directly in front of the motor in lieu of a motor block ring, as it greatly enhances the strength of the tube directly in front of the motor, the "crumple zone".
DSC00651.jpg
 

Dotini

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Finally beautiful weather has arrived (winds 1 mph)! A trip to 60 Acres this morning yielded 3 great launches before the field began filling up for soccer practice. Flight #2 on a C6-5 resulted in a descent time of about 42 seconds. Much more experimentation needs to be done with this particular model since it was designed and built to utilize interchange fins and tubes. My launch partner, like me a retired Being engineer, built this model himself, his first scratch built, at my shop. Testing resumes next week. We have 3 fin cans and 4 body tube lengths to experiment with.

DSC00654.jpg
Magnus Opum Mk 1.2

Edit: A group of spectators clustered around us after our first launch on a B4-2. They were totally astonished at how a rocket could descend so slowly and land like a feather without a parachute. After our rocket launched on the C6-5, they gasped and shouted expletives at the amazing altitude, tracking smoke and loud pop at apogee. The descent seemed to take an eternity, completely horizontal and spinning furiously. It the wind had been up we might have been in trouble, even at 60 Acres.
 
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