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Horizontal rocket recovery?

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Spacepirate R

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I have an (clone) Astron Sprint and when it last flew it landed hard tail (engine) first and had some damage. I am using a long party streamer for recovery. I read in the "Handbook of Model Rocketry" that for some streamer recovery models the shock cord (harness?) is attached externally on the CG, but it does not show how. Anyone know a good technique? I built the Sprint for "sport" rather than for competition, should I just use a small parachute instead?

Thank you!
 

dhbarr

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Small hole, cord goes through hole. I knotted mine around the mmt before gluing it in, knot inside BT. I also notched my NC so the cord wouldn't bind on ejection.

I, err, got a little crazy on the light weight / big efficient chute. It drifted for ~3mins on a B and was never seen again.
 

Coop

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I use a horizontal recovery with my Bucky Jones. It's got these swoopy fins everyone tells me I am going to break upon landing. I've got at least a half-dozen flights on her--some with experimental parachutes--and it's not broke one yet, so the theory can be put into practice.

I've got a Kevlar cord tied from one of the fins to the shock cord... When the shock cord is ejected, the Kevlar cord limits how far down the aft end can drop.

All that said... Properly sizing your recovery system for the rocket weight is the first order of business. How much does your rocket weigh and what size streamer are you using?

Later!

--Coop
 

Spacepirate R

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All that said... Properly sizing your recovery system for the rocket weight is the first order of business. How much does your rocket weigh and what size streamer are you using?

Later!
--Coop
I don't have a proper scale but in the Estes catalogues a Sprint is listed as 1oz. Mine might be a little heavier than that. The streamer I used is 2" wide and about 70" long. I did a bit more research and I think I might use a small (8" or so) chute or a 12" chute with a spill hole and reefing and stick with "B" engines. It still goes very high on a B!
 

Coop

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I'd strongly recommend getting a decent scale. They can be had for fairly cheap. I got one that'd read 0.01 grams up to 2 kg for around $25. I have another for larger models. Relying on the published weights is a risky proposition... often, the difference between the manufacturer's published weight and the individual flier's recovery weight can be significant...


Later!

--Coop
 

dhbarr

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I'd strongly recommend getting a decent scale. They can be had for fairly cheap. I got one that'd read 0.01 grams up to 2 kg for around $25. I have another for larger models. Relying on the published weights is a risky proposition... often, the difference between the manufacturer's published weight and the individual flier's recovery weight can be significant...


Later!

--Coop
+1, I have a Big Daddy cone that weighs as much as the published kit weight.
 
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