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LW Bercini

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I'm hoping one of you guys has networking experience and is willing to help me.

I have a Cisco router, and even with an extender, I cannot get a strong enough wireless signal to the floor above.

To solve the problem, I've picked up an enterprise Wi-fi system from Ubiquiti. I have read the instructions, but they appear to be written for a professional networking person. Unfortunately, my skills as a database designer do not prepare me for the terminology in the set-up instructions.

Would one of you kind people help me with this?

Thank you.
 

Dave A

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I bought a net gear all in one modem-woreless router, C6300. Then bought a net gear extender, AC1200. I can reach my wireless security camera out in my shop, and great WiFi signal while out there.

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Dave A

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If you have existing equipment, your Internet provider could help you over the phone if they are willing.
 

cvanc

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Well, here's some indirect help. I suggest you analyze how busy your WiFi spectrum is to see if simply changing channels might improve things.

Unless you live in a rural area you've got lots of WiFi signals in your home from neighbors and such. There's only so many WiFi channels available, and lots of routers are left in their default channel assignments, leading to certain WiFi channels being jam packed with signals that interfere with each other (thus reducing range), while other channels are relatively clear.

There is an app called 'InSSIDer' which turns your PC into a poor mans' spectrum analyzer. Using this app you can see exactly what channel you (and everyone else) are on. Often you will find you're sharing a channel with multiple other strong local signals, while other channels are not used at all.

If you find this is your situation, you need to determine how to change your router to broadcast on one of the quieter channels. Moving your signal to a quieter channel can work wonders. It can make a really big difference in network quality, speed, and reliability.

Good luck.
 

LW Bercini

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...Unless you live in a rural area...
I do. I have to drive if I want to go to my nearest neighbor's house.

The basic problem is getting a signal from one side of the basement to the other side of an upper floor within a 6000 sq/ft house.
 
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H_Rocket

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Get a smaller house?

:tongue:

One thing that can help (if your access point has external antennae), is to vary the position and see if changing the field orientation helps.

What exactly did you get from Ubiquity?
 

neil_w

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Maybe not helpful, but I installed a 3pack of Google Wifi pucks in my house and they work great, with trivially easy installation. I'd expect equivalent experience from Eero or any of the other consumer-focused mesh wifi vendors.
 

markkoelsch

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First thing- move the router to the middle of the house. This will help with signal distribution.

Secondly- if it has to be in the basement, which I do not recommend, get it as close to the ceiling/ floor joists as possible.
 

tHoagland

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I use the Ubiquity AP's at work and find them frustratingly complicated for a simple task.

Assuming that the router is not in metal lined room, I'd try changing its orientation. Personally, I'm a huge fan of the Asus routers with external antennas. These allow you to manipulate the radiation pattern to eliminate holes.
 

o1d_dude

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First thing- move the router to the middle of the house. This will help with signal distribution.

Secondly- if it has to be in the basement, which I do not recommend, get it as close to the ceiling/ floor joists as possible.
This.
 

mpitfield

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First thing- move the router to the middle of the house. This will help with signal distribution.

Secondly- if it has to be in the basement, which I do not recommend, get it as close to the ceiling/ floor joists as possible.
I would start with this, as the basement is the worst place you can put it, which is typically full of electrical, conduits, HVAC, etc. I would also look at your config, wider channels may theoretically provide more bandwidth but only at a relatively close range, if 2.4GHz then use 20MHz and for 5Ghz don't go over 40mhz. You should provide more details on the options/config you have selected. APs, whether they are consumer grade or enterprise are not typically optimized by selecting defaults.

I use the Ubiquity AP's at work and find them frustratingly complicated for a simple task.

Assuming that the router is not in metal lined room, I'd try changing its orientation. Personally, I'm a huge fan of the Asus routers with external antennas. These allow you to manipulate the radiation pattern to eliminate holes.
Most APs and wireless environments are frustrating even for network engineers but a little knowledge goes a long way. In this case these APs have either a single or dual radio that is integrated into them, so there is no diversifying or manipulating the antennas for coverage, just physically moving it. Typically these APs provide the best coverage located centrally on the ceiling and often have a small dead spot directly under them, something to keep in mind. Also avoid placing it anywhere close to a microwave, it will interfere as consumer microwaves operate @ 2.45GHz band and some have better shielding than others. Other sources of EMI to avoid would be electrical and things light ballasts for lights.

Bottom line, if the AP, and your devices, support 5GHz then use it and just shut off the 2.4GHz which will allow you to optimize it for a single frequency, this is because some of the optimize options are not meant to be enabled when in mixed mode, such as short guard interval.

These are popular and have gained market share for one reason, they are inexpensive for the features and quality as well as have centralized web management. You see them popping up in retails stores and small businesses all over the place, I just set one up for a cafe I visit. Not to sound argumentative, but as far as the class of product, they are certainly a better design than the rest of the consumer pack, but Ubiquiti are not Enterprise class, they wish. Having said that it's a good choice for this application if you can fill the dead spots.
 

warnerr

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spacemanmst gave good advice. I do this for a living. consider each wall a signal degrading obstacle. basement... dirts full of iron- our enemy. metal studs- ouch. refrigerators, heaters- metal signal blocks. Those radio interfering signals from microwave, phone... they win! To beat this you need a STRONG signal. in 6000 feet you WILL NOT GET IT FROM ONE SOURCE. {* without sterilizing you and all future generations[emoji38]} !!!! you must use cables extended this signal to a WAP (wireless access point) to a couple of locations. Quality varies on access points - simply, you get what you pay for. Pay attention to the bandwidth! a couple of extensions from basement home location should flood the are. Commercially we use A LOT- guarantees great signal (and sterilization of all future generations so as to not repeat same mistakes [emoji38]). Simple answer- don't expect one source to have great reception throughout a 6000 ft home.
 

dhbarr

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Plain 802.11b on channel 1 will penetrate surprisingly well. But yeah, as close to the center of your house as practical and watch out for radio shadows.
 

Q-Aero

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Run a Ethernet cable to your basement to a second wifi point
This is the best solution, if you don't want pass wires true the floor , you can use powerline ethernet adaptors, you simply plug them in the outlet, just make sure the 2 outlets are on the same rail in the electrical box, uselessly you have 2 rails with the neutral in the middle, don't open the electrical box, ask an electrician.

With powerline ethernet adaptors, the network signal is superposed over the 60 hz 120 volts in the house wirings.


https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00I0MKIDO...scsubtag=1c062150-24af-11e7-a6bd-81a4ec03703b
 

Marc_G

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Since the Ubiquiti hardware is already purchased I suggest googling for setup tips. I'm not at my computer now so copying links is a pain but did a quick google search for "setup Ubiquiti AP" and got lots of helpful-looking results. I've heard the many options these devices have can make a simple set up daunting. Also be sure the devices are updated... There was a big security flaw on some of their products in the news recently. Good luck.

PS I agree with the advice to start with central location of the primary router... Not that mine is centrally-located mind you <wink>

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mpitfield

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One thing to clarify in my "centrally located" recommendation. I should have specified centrally located for the coverage area you are looking for. As commented by others 6,000' is a lot to cover, however you likely don't need or want full coverage on a 6,000 home. If so then a single AP will not provide adequate coverage, at least without taking a hit to the performance and reliability...it really depends on the coverage you are looking for.
 
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