GUNS & ROCKETS

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

rharshberger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2014
Messages
9,138
Reaction score
1,272
Location
Pasco, WA
My dads old Stevens 22 Long rifle. Same box the 1873 was on. Don’t know how old it is, or how rare, but it’s a cute lil bugger. The barrel is shot out tho...
Depending on its value, you can have the barrel lined and return it to shooting accurately. Barrel lining is where the gunsmith drills out the old bore using special tooling, then inserts a barrel liner which is basically a thin walled rifled tube, the barrel is then rechambered and its nearly as good as new. The reasons that barrel is "shot out" is probably due more to corrosive primers and less than meticulous cleaning practices over the many years. I am guessing the .22 is a old Steven Favorite, should be possible to find year of manufacture based on serial no. or at least to the nearest decade. Does the manufacturers stamp on top the barrel read J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co if so its pre 1916, a 1915 model would be stamped on the upper tang and the manufacturers address would read J. Stevens Arms Co. Determining if its an 1889 or 1894 model would require removing the butt stock and looking inside the reciever. There should be a serial number under the lever. Pre1916 manufacture guns are hard to date due to lack of surviving records, over the years I have seen and handled a few Stevens Favorites. Would it be possible to get closeups of all sides of the receiver, top of the barrel and the butt of the rifle?
 

jd2cylman

Still not Carl... ;-)
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
4,326
Reaction score
365
Depending on its value, you can have the barrel lined and return it to shooting accurately. Barrel lining is where the gunsmith drills out the old bore using special tooling, then inserts a barrel liner which is basically a thin walled rifled tube, the barrel is then rechambered and its nearly as good as new. The reasons that barrel is "shot out" is probably due more to corrosive primers and less than meticulous cleaning practices over the many years. I am guessing the .22 is a old Steven Favorite, should be possible to find year of manufacture based on serial no. or at least to the nearest decade. Does the manufacturers stamp on top the barrel read J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co if so its pre 1916, a 1915 model would be stamped on the upper tang and the manufacturers address would read J. Stevens Arms Co. Determining if its an 1889 or 1894 model would require removing the butt stock and looking inside the reciever. There should be a serial number under the lever. Pre1916 manufacture guns are hard to date due to lack of surviving records, over the years I have seen and handled a few Stevens Favorites. Would it be possible to get closeups of all sides of the receiver, top of the barrel and the butt of the rifle?
Rich,
While you posted this, I was doing a little looking. It must be a Favorite. However, mine says " J Stevens A & T Co" then "Patent Apr 17 94" I think. There is a number 754 under the lever.
Off to show the 1873 to the local former gun smith.
Laters.
 

rharshberger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2014
Messages
9,138
Reaction score
1,272
Location
Pasco, WA
Rich,
While you posted this, I was doing a little looking. It must be a Favorite. However, mine says " J Stevens A & T Co" then "Patent Apr 17 94" I think. There is a number 754 under the lever.
Off to show the 1873 to the local former gun smith.
Laters.
So its most likely a Stevens Favorite Model 17 1894, 754 is a low serial number so it was made prior to 1916, thats about as close to age as you will probably get. I am best guessing this based on information from a number of sources I have here at home. As you most likely have discovered already the screw and loop in front of the trigger gaurd is the takedown screw, loosen it up the the barrel is removeable, a new reproduction barrel that may fit it is available from Gun Parts Corporation as well as very few original parts. The gun either barrel lined or barrel replaced would be a great little gun. Value as is hard to say but it looks to me to be a standard Model 17, there were 18, 19's and iirc 20's made during the early era, but they had features like peep sights and other extras, none of the Stevens guns have the Model marked on them with the exception of the 1915 iirc. There was a Model 71 made in 1971 by Savage or Springfield who had acquired Stevens, same rifle newer manufacture.
 
Last edited:

Steve Shannon

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 23, 2011
Messages
6,090
Reaction score
2,584
Location
Butte, Montana
1886 standard caliber list: 45-70, .45-90 WCF, .40-82 WCF, .40-65 WCF, .38-56 WCF, .50-110 WCF, .40-70 WCF, .38-70 WCF, .33 WCF.
.38-56, octagon barrel, set triggers. Really nice for its age, unlike me.
I’ve not taken the time to follow up on the serial number. It belonged to my wife’s uncle who died in ‘87. It probably was bought in Tonopah, NV in the early 20th century.
 

jd2cylman

Still not Carl... ;-)
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
4,326
Reaction score
365
So its most likely a Stevens Favorite Model 17 1894, 754 is a low serial number so it was made prior to 1916, thats about as close to age as you will probably get. I am best guessing this based on information from a number of sources I have here at home. As you most likely have discovered already the screw and loop in front of the trigger gaurd is the takedown screw, loosen it up the the barrel is removeable, a new reproduction barrel that may fit it is available from Gun Parts Corporation as well as very few original parts. The gun either barrel lined or barrel replaced would be a great little gun. Value as is hard to say but it looks to me to be a standard Model 17, there were 18, 19's and iirc 20's made during the early era, but they had features like peep sights and other extras, none of the Stevens guns have the Model marked on them with the exception of the 1915 iirc. There was a Model 71 made in 1971 by Savage or Springfield who had acquired Stevens, same rifle newer manufacture.
Wow, thanks for all the info. I had no idea it was that old. I'll probably just put it on some hooks in my living room. The ejector fork is shot and the block doesn't fit tight against the barrel any more. But it's cool to know a little more than I did this morning. Thanks very much!
 

jd2cylman

Still not Carl... ;-)
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
4,326
Reaction score
365
.38-56, octagon barrel, set triggers. Really nice for its age, unlike me.
I’ve not taken the time to follow up on the serial number. It belonged to my wife’s uncle who died in ‘87. It probably was bought in Tonopah, NV in the early 20th century.
Cool.
 

o1d_dude

'I battle gravity'
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
7,558
Reaction score
442
Location
Urff
.38-56, octagon barrel, set triggers. Really nice for its age, unlike me.
I’ve not taken the time to follow up on the serial number. It belonged to my wife’s uncle who died in ‘87. It probably was bought in Tonopah, NV in the early 20th century.
Tonapah.

Whenever I hear “Tonapah”, it makes me think ”I’ve been from Tucson to Tucumcari, Tehachapi to Tonapah, driven every kind of rig that’s ever been maaaaaade...”

Unfortunately, my dad sold and traded all his guns to finance his summer home in Maine so I don’t have any of the guns he “haunted”.
 

John Kemker

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
1,002
Reaction score
417
Tonapah.

Whenever I hear “Tonapah”, it makes me think ”I’ve been from Tucson to Tucumcari, Tehachapi to Tonapah, driven every kind of rig that’s ever been maaaaaade...”

Unfortunately, my dad sold and traded all his guns to finance his summer home in Maine so I don’t have any of the guns he “haunted”.
"Driven the back roads, so I wouldn't get weighed..."
 

Funkworks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2018
Messages
440
Reaction score
162
In 1902, large guns were apparently the standard way of sending people to the moon (5:50):


And that was my contribution to this thread. 😁
 
Top