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Give Mylar parachutes a break!!!

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rocket trike

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I would like to stand up for Mylar parachutes. We have sold a bunch since we started offering them. We have many repeat customers and I have not heard any problems with them. I have some people say they would not use Mylar and we sent them a free 12" parachute and it change their mind.

Our Mylar parachutes are made with thin Mlyar. We make them a 8 side parachute. We use a 50# soft Kevlar for the shroud lines. This Kevlar is not stiff at all. It makes the packing and the deployment of the chute alot better. We have sold parachute to people on TRF and they have said great things about them. I hope some of them will step uop and stand up for Mylar parachutes.

We were told by a customer that his son use one of our 18" Mylar parachute in his competition rocket and set a national record by over 7000 point from the old one. I am working with him on getting some competiton Mylar streamers put together to.

We feel that our Mylar parachute can change the mind of people about Mylar parachutes that we would like to offer the first 10 people who does not like Mylar parachutes a free 12" Mylar parachute. All you have to do is e-mail us at rocketheadrockets@rap.midco.net with your mailing address and we will send a chute right out to you. You can also see what other people is asying about our parachutes at www.rocketheadrockets.com and look at our guess book. I have attached a picture of our parachutes.

We know that we will not change everyones mind but we feel that Mylar is the best parachute for your low power rockets.

Regards tom
 

shockwaveriderz

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tom:
I don't think you need to stand up for mylar chutes, at least as you mean it. It sounds to me, based on the other thread, that its more of an education problem than a mylar problem. Mylar being a plastic requires that you dust it with talc so it will not stick to itself.....its that simple...go buy some baby powder and dust the chute top and bottom.....its that simple.....us people who have been using mylar for competition chutes for almost 40 years know this..I would not expect people who are using mylar for the first time to know this.....

as far as your mylar streamers are concerned.....I think I would almost pay a premium price to purchase mylar pleated/folded streamers as used in NAR competition.....thats how much I hate doing it......
 

DynaSoar

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Originally posted by shockwaveriderz
tom:
I don't think you need to stand up for mylar chutes, at least as you mean it. It sounds to me, based on the other thread, that its more of an education problem than a mylar problem. Mylar being a plastic requires that you dust it with talc so it will not stick to itself.....its that simple...go buy some baby powder and dust the chute top and bottom.....its that simple.....
Agreed. I've never had a problem with them. I read the suggestions on prepping them and followed those. If the wadding happens to shift during boost, a plastic chute can get burn holes. Mylar resists that.

BTW, any cute can benefit from powder.

BTW2, you can get fluourescent orange marking powder from the hardware store and use enough of that to give a nice ejection burst marker as well as powder the chute.
 

Micromeister

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Originally posted by shockwaveriderz
tom:
I don't think you need to stand up for mylar chutes, at least as you mean it. It sounds to me, based on the other thread, that its more of an education problem than a mylar problem. Mylar being a plastic requires that you dust it with talc so it will not stick to itself.....its that simple...go buy some baby powder and dust the chute top and bottom.....its that simple.....us people who have been using mylar for competition chutes for almost 40 years know this..I would not expect people who are using mylar for the first time to know this.....

as far as your mylar streamers are concerned.....I think I would almost pay a premium price to purchase mylar pleated/folded streamers as used in NAR competition.....thats how much I hate doing it......
I also Agree..Can We get an AMEN!
Tom: you make your parasheets the same way I've made my competition chutes for years. Keep up the good work. It really is an education thing... Hope you'll add tlac dusting to your chute instructions;)

Talc- It's the other white powder:D
Second benifit, talc also helps offset the sulfur-dioxide smell in the car on the way home:D:D
 

lalligood

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While I feel rather neutral on the Mylar vs ripstop nylon (vs plastic) chute argument--I have used all three, have had great success with all 3 materials, & even have had a few failures with all 3 too... I just use what I feel is best matched for which ever rocket I'm going to launch. However, I can say this with great confidence though: Rockethead Rockets' Mylar chute is the BEST Mylar chute I've ever used. It came with my Battle Axe kit (great kit, BTW!), has flown several times in it, & has worked flawlessly every time. Unquestionably high quality materials goes into those chutes!
 

powderburner

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For low-power, I definitely use plastic sheet.
For sport rockets, mylar is hard to beat. I also use garbage bag plastic if I want a monster-sized chute.
For NAR PD competition I used dry cleaner bags and thread. It just can't be beaten. Besides being incredibly cheap, you can pack a whole lot of square inches of chute into a BT. So what if they're only good for a few flights, most of those competition birds thermalled off into neverland on the first flight.

Does anybody else remember the paper sleeves used to protect plastic chutes from hot ejection gas? I used to use a combo of wadding, talc, and paper sleeve to get a big wad of parachute out of those little 18mm birds. It worked great, and I rarely ever had chute damage (in fact, I don't remember EVER having burn-holes in the plastic)
 

Rocket_Russ

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Originally posted by rocket trike

We were told by a customer that his son use one of our 18" Mylar parachute in his competition rocket and set a national record by over 7000 point from the old one. I am working with him on getting some competiton Mylar streamers put together to.


We know that we will not change everyones mind but we feel that Mylar is the best parachute for your low power rockets.

Regards tom
This is true, and my 7 year old's B Superroc duration record is now listed on the NAR record site. I'd say a majority of our family's contest flights this year have been made on Tom's awesome Mylar chutes and streamers. All three of us are listed in the top 5 in NAR points so far, so Rockethead Rockets is well represented.

Here in the dry state of Colorado, we don't have much problem with Mylar sticking to itself, but just use some baby powder if you live in high humidity. Why anyone would prefer plastic is beyond me.

Russ
NAR #81741
 

wyldbill

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Originally posted by Rocket_Russ
Here in the dry state of Colorado, we don't have much problem with Mylar sticking to itself ... Russ
NAR #81741
Funny thing, I was the one who started the other thread. I live and fly in Colorado and had exactly these problems.... (and for the record, the chutes were not stored in the rocket and were re-packed just before flight, but not talc'd). While I'm sure that some folks love Mylar in general, but I've had poor luck repeatedly. Maybe it's the brand of 'chute (which I won't divulge), or the particular material used.

FWIW,
-bill
 

limd21

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During the winter/early spring here in Colorado, my mylar chutes routinely outperformed my plastic chotes - so much so that by now, all my rockets now use mylar.

One trick I use is to agressively crumple the mylar chutes until they have lots of little wrinkles, then I fold and pack as usual. I think this helps prevent sticking and the chutes from taking too much of a "set" when packed. This is sort of like how (moderately) used paper currency notes don't stick to each other as much as crisp, brand new ones do.
 

shockwaveriderz

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yes scrunching is good for mylar........

face it Bill, its obviously an end user operator error....heheheheh

try scrunching and talcing and let us know if it helps any....

:)
 

maxq2244

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Well I have never used Mylar chutes before so I am going to give them a try. Rocket Trike I just placed a order for some of your chutes and streamers. I'm going to NSL 2004 with a large number of rockets so I will put them to use. When I get back from NSL I will reply back on how everything went.
 

Ryan S.

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I have used mylar before and it works great. As long as you dont get a small rip (which will turn into a big one) they work very well
 

Micromeister

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Just remember to pre-crumple and talc baby powder your plastic or mylar chutes you'll be just fine.
 

Silverleaf

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I have to ask - why pre-crumple ?

I attach the chute to a leader, dust it with talc, and attach it to a hook on the center top edge of a fan, turn it on and let her run for about 10 minutes. When done, the chute has formed properly, and I drop it into a ziploc bag with more talc and voila.

I've been doing this for a few years, and my chutes seem to open easier, and form their shape quicker on average than others.

My friend and I launched 2 Patriots side by side, on B-6-4's 2 seperate times and both times my chute opened quicker. Then we tried his Saturn V with his chutes - had a very close call, then used mine on the second flight and they opened quicker and smoother.

Just a thought,
 

Micromeister

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Why you ask??
Well to make a fairly long story short enough to keep folks attention.
I am privileged to know and fly with several members of the US International mod-roc team. These guys sit around talking rockets while crumpling their 1/4mil mylar chutes for hours. One corner at a time working all the way around the 12 to 16 shroud 24 to 40inch chutes until they drop open without any other stimulus! well, other than a light dusting of talc powder.
The guy stands up with the chute in a very tight ball in his hand, holds his arm out in front, open his grip releasing the canopy while holding the end of the shrouds and just watch it fall completely open. NO movement other than his release.
I'm not suggesting everone do that much work..cause it is WORK! and takes a very long long time.. but my own experience has shown, if we crumple our new mylar chute about 6 or 8 times, than dust with talc, you will almost never have a plastic wad recovery. As I mentioned in the other thread this is a VERY OLD low tech NO power required way to ensure good recovery in 30Plus years I have logged only 4 plastic wad chute recoveries, and thoses were a very long time ago. This crumple method works with ALL types of plastic, mylar, dry cleaner bag and warping paper type materials, no matter the mil thickness or original "stickiness" of the material. Crumple and dust, take it from the pro's;)
 

teflonrocketry1

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For parachutes I use an expanded PTFE film, the same stuff pipe thread sealant tape is made from. These 'chutes still need Talc to help them open but since Teflon melts over 200 degrees higher than any of these other materials (Mylar, Nylon, and Polyethylene) it doesn't melt or stick together and no wadding is required.

Bruce S. Levison, NAR #69055 A.K.A. Teflon Rocketry
 

Hospital_Rocket

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For almost all my LPR work, I use mylar, I've never had one fail to deploy. My only gripe is that they are a bit fragile at the shroud points. I've tried most everything from the self stick reinforcements to shipping tape. They cost so little that I just toss them when the tie point gets weak.

One really positive point is their reflective behavior. Great for small dia high altitude flights.
 

Micromeister

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Al:
I gave up on paper tape disks years ago, I've been using 3/8" & 1/2" wide chrome mylar tape or 1/2mil chrome adhesive backed mylar for my competition type mylar chute shroud anchors and minor repairs. I tie a figure-8 knot in the end of 2 strand kevlar thread shrouds bend a approx. 1/2" hook in the thread and apply it to the canopy with a piece of chrome mylar about 1/2" x 1/2" then burnish the tape to the mylar canopy with an 1/8" ball burnishing tool, (looks like a metal pencil with an 1/8" round smooth steel ball on the point, a leather work tool) the shrouds usually outlast the canopy;) If memory serves Andy @ A.S.P. Sell the 1/2" chrome mylar tape roll for holding motors in.. works fine for Shroud anchors and minor chute repairs also.
I think you can see a piece of this tape in the pic below, the stuff blends in so well it is hard to see.
 

Micromeister

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Here's a quick 4 pic page showing a method of crumpling mylar chutes into submission;) I learned this technique for some of the FAI flyers I hope it will help those having trouble getting your new mylar, plastic or mylar warpping paper chutes to open. Talc dusting is as required!
 

flying_silverad

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Originally posted by teflonrocketry1
For parachutes I use an expanded PTFE film, the same stuff pipe thread sealant tape is made from. These 'chutes still need Talc to help them open but since Teflon melts over 200 degrees higher than any of these other materials (Mylar, Nylon, and Polyethylene) it doesn't melt or stick together and no wadding is required.

Bruce S. Levison, NAR #69055 A.K.A. Teflon Rocketry

Does it come in sheets?
 

Micromeister

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Flying:
I recently picked up a yard 36" x 37.5" wide .003" thick 4.01oz/sq yd. 500degree piece of tear resistant PTFE coated fibergalss fabric from McMaster Carr #8876K81 kind of pricey at 5.11 per running foot or 15.33 /sq yd. the material is pretty neat suff but on the stiff side.
I also ordered a piece of Polymide (kapton) plastic. 750 degree rated insulating blanket film. .003" thich the material is 25" wide. I purchased a 24" square for 8.57/running ft. or 17.14 for the piece.
Haven't had the time to make any canopies, but plan to soon.
I know there's a place that sells expanded PTFE in 12" rolls but haven't wanted to spend that much money.. Largest expanded PTFE i've used is a 2" x 43' roll from McMaster which make EXCELLANT streamers. and permanent Pom-Pom wadding balls.
Bruce has more sources... He'll likely post soon.
 

teflonrocketry1

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I originally got expanded PTFE (Teflon) sheeting from a chemist at W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. I only got a few sheets of the thinner white colored material, and a sample of Glide (TM) dental floss (Shroud Lines), which I used to construct the first all Teflon parachute. Since the expanded PTFE gives or stretches slightly, the flat parachutes I made from it eventually took on a hemispherical shape.

I also obtained colored material from Plastomer Technologies in Newton, PA. The bulk un-split rolls, wich are about 11 inches wide, cost around $400 for 10 pounds (about 10000 feet).

http://www.enproindustries.com/comp...ling/pro-pt.htm

or try:

http://www.plastomertech.com/ptfe_tapes_and_films.asp

McMaster Carr http://www.mcmaster.com sells two inch wide colored millitary grade tapes see p 3145 in their on-line catalog.

The best parachutes are all one piece; with no shroud line attachments. The shrould lines and canopy are continuous and cut from the same piece. After cutting I roll the flat traces into round lines. You can pack these materials really tight I have yet to try compressing them under pressure after I powder them with Talc.

Bruce S. Levison, NAR #69055
 
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