Foolproof (or almost foolproof) method of getting parachute to deploy fully and not tangled up?

bjphoenix

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
May 3, 2011
Messages
1,427
Reaction score
531
What do you consider "Small Diameter" ?
We have some Mach1 BT-50 Fiberglass Rockets with LOC or 12" Nylon parachutes. It fits, and flys well. ( Does take a bit of careful packing to make sure it slides easily, but not too bad.)
In the old days we built a lot of BT-20 rockets, with 12" plastic chutes. They are a little harder to pack but can be done. However this is where I learned that you can't do all the double triple folding wrapping etc. and then expect that tiny little compacted plastic lump to open.
 

bad_idea

A known cause of NaN errors
TRF Supporter
Joined
Mar 19, 2021
Messages
608
Reaction score
453
Location
North Texas
However this is where I learned that you can't do all the double triple folding wrapping etc. and then expect that tiny little compacted plastic lump to open.
This was my downfall and subsequent revelation alike in my early park tests last year.

Despite learning I can pack a tight chute with a decent chance of opening though, I've come to prefer a long streamer on almost every light rocket.
 

jazzviper1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2011
Messages
953
Reaction score
320
Take from a parachute rigger who also has 45 years of messing with tiny parachutes. Neat packing of the chute and shock cord is the best bet. Unless you are flying low and slow, you should pack the chute neatly and compactly so that it opens slowly. Also try to pack the shock cord neatly, and try to keep snag points to a minimum. If your plastic chute is one of those thick stiff ones like Estes is using now, they don't like being packed tightly so toss it and make one out of thin mil trash bags.
 
Top