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Fixing a bent motor case.

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Gym_Class_Hero

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I found an old motor case (CTI 3G). :D Here's the catch, the threaded end of the case has a small dent in it (not very deep, but enough to keep the reload from screwing in. So I am trying to figure out a way to straighten it out. It's free, so I have nothing to lose, but I want to give it the ol college try. :D

What do you guys think would be the best way to try and straighten it out?
 
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Chrisn

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Sending us a photo will be the quick way :)
 

ben_ullman

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I found an old motor case (CTI 3G) in Wildman's box of junk today, and he let me keep it for free. :D Here's the catch, the threaded end of the case has a small dent in it (not very deep, but enough to keep the reload from screwing in. So I am trying to figure out a way to straighten it out. It's free, so I have nothing to lose, but I want to give it the ol college try. :D

What do you guys think would be the best way to try and straighten it out?
if you have a flat head screwdriver small enough to fit between the threads put it in there and use a mallet to see if that will move it enough to be usable.

If not, send it to CTI and tell them its deffective ;) :p

Ben
 

Chrisn

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Is it the thread which is damaged, or the casing has been dented and deforming the thread?
 

ben_ullman

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Is it the thread which is damaged, or the casing has been dented and deforming the thread?
It sounds like the latter IMO. I.E. the dent is causing the threads to not be threadable.

Ben
 

Binder Design

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Support the casing securely with a pipe vise being careful to use a shop rag around the casing as to not mar it.

Use a wooden dowel just a bit smaller than the casing ID, put it in about halfway then pry it towards the dent putting pressure directly on the dented side.

That should do the trick.

Mike Fisher
 

troj

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If not, send it to CTI and tell them its deffective ;) :p
Sorry, Ben, but I don't find recommendations like this to be even vaguely humorous.

Now, ignoring that, don't expect CTI to provide any sort of warranty coverage on the case, should you repair it, unless they've specifically stated that the repair results in something they will cover.

-Kevin
 

ben_ullman

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Sorry, Ben, but I don't find recommendations like this to be even vaguely humorous.

Now, ignoring that, don't expect CTI to provide any sort of warranty coverage on the case, should you repair it, unless they've specifically stated that the repair results in something they will cover.

-Kevin
Sorry Kevin. Didnt mean to step on anyones toes.

Ben
 

Gym_Class_Hero

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Thanks for the input guys. I went ahead and did what Mike suggested, with a little help from a long nose pliers. It worked like a charm. The threads got a little roughed up, but they were straighted out by sliding a slotted screwdriver through while I heated the case over the stove.
 

powderburner

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It's great that your DIY refurb worked out, but you should be extra careful of hidden damage.

I think troj sort of hinted at this (whether the manufacturer would be happy with your fix). You could have some subtle damage that you don't even know is there. With the "dented" motor case, and with the "un-dent" repair, the metal case could be weakened or cracked. (Some alloys are more forgiving than others for this sort of thing.) If you had any thread damage at all, it would be possible for the case to let go of an end closure.

I suggest that you spend at least one or two reloads on some ground proof tests. You need to find the propellant load that generates the highest internal pressure (regardless of the duration of that pressure) and use it. Inspect motor case and end closures very carefully afterward.

My two cents (which you didn't even ask for)
 

barstoolmike

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I agree, a couple ground tests are cheeper & safer than trashing a rocket. Besides if the threads do fail it will be at ejection. Do you realy want it coming in balistic because you didn't test it first. (safety first & above all else)

Mike

Another 2 cents you didn't ask for.
 

cjl

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Why would the threads fail at ejection? I'd guess that if they were to let go, it would be at ignition, which is often the point of maximum internal pressure.
 

ben_ullman

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Why would the threads fail at ejection? I'd guess that if they were to let go, it would be at ignition, which is often the point of maximum internal pressure.
I agree. The threads are holding pressure of the motor not the motor at ejection.

Ben
 

Binder Design

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Thanks for the input guys. I went ahead and did what Mike suggested, with a little help from a long nose pliers. It worked like a charm. The threads got a little roughed up, but they were straighted out by sliding a slotted screwdriver through while I heated the case over the stove.
Glad that worked for you. As long as the threads are mostly intact I wouldn't worry about flying it. Remember, most cases with commercial loads are rated very conservatively, the hardware is usually good to at least twice that pressure.

I'd say go for it, but you might want to make sure it's not in a one of your favorite rockets just in case. :)

Mike Fisher
 

ben_ullman

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Remember, most cases with commercial loads are rated very conservatively, the hardware is usually good to at least twice that pressure.

I'd say go for it, but you might want to make sure it's not in a one of your favorite rockets just in case. :)

Mike Fisher
How would you know? What kind of experience do you have with motor pressures and design?

Ben























Disclaimer, Mike Fisher is a kick @ss motor maker ;) This was meant to push any and all of his buttons
 

Gym_Class_Hero

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I'm pretty sure it would hold, the dent was very minor. Let me explain...

The dent only affected 1/8 or so of the circumfrence of the case. It was also only 3 thread layers deep. I feel that the re-bent threads are still around 70-80% their original strength. It should hold. :)

What do you guys think would be a good test load? The Vmax?
 

Binder Design

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How would you know? What kind of experience do you have with motor pressures and design?

Ben

Disclaimer, Mike Fisher is a kick @ss motor maker ;) This was meant to push any and all of his buttons
Nah, I'm an easy going guy (most of the time).:) Thanks for the comment!

Mike
 

ben_ullman

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Nah, I'm an easy going guy (most of the time).:) Thanks for the comment!

Mike
Mike you don't give yourself enough credit. You are on my top 5 "need to pick their brain" list in rocketry. a 38mm L5000 ? I can't even get a simple 98-13k N4000 to work.

Ben
 

cjl

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I'm pretty sure it would hold, the dent was very minor. Let me explain...

The dent only affected 1/8 or so of the circumfrence of the case. It was also only 3 thread layers deep. I feel that the re-bent threads are still around 70-80% their original strength. It should hold. :)

What do you guys think would be a good test load? The Vmax?
I'd try either the vmax or the white thunder to start.
 

ben_ullman

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I'd try either the vmax or the white thunder to start.
yeah that or the blue streak. The white is pretty tame. Its got a super rediculous KN (alot of whites do) Vmax and blue are pretty kicking.

Ben
 

cjl

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The Blue Streak is pretty tame, as blues are concerned. Actually, I like the longer burn that it has compared to blue thunder. It gives a good alternative to all of the fast blues on the market.
 

ben_ullman

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The Blue Streak is pretty tame, as blues are concerned. Actually, I like the longer burn that it has compared to blue thunder. It gives a good alternative to all of the fast blues on the market.
That suprises me. Any blue will (should) hit harder than a white. It may not burn like it but the pressures from a blue should be more than white. Just from my experience.

Ben
 

cjl

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Honestly, just from having seen it, I can almost guarantee you that White Thunder hits harder than Blue Streak (both of which hit harder than, say, AT White Lightning or CTI standard).

Oh, and would you consider this to be a white propellant?
http://www.pro38.com/images/NATS2.jpg
 

ben_ullman

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Honestly, just from having seen it, I can almost guarantee you that White Thunder hits harder than Blue Streak (both of which hit harder than, say, AT White Lightning or CTI standard).

Oh, and would you consider this to be a white propellant?
http://www.pro38.com/images/NATS2.jpg
I wish I could see the thrust/pressure data. Just because the MOTOR looks like it has a bigger flame doesn't mean the pressures higher. I246blue I315 white for the 38-3G. The blue has a higher total thrust.

Ben
 

cjl

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Very true (I'm a student in aerospace engineering, and I've already taken a class involving nozzle design - give me some credit here). As for total impulse (often incorrectly called total thrust), it is completely irrelevant. Actually, what would be useful would be the nozzle specs. From nozzle throat diameter and initial thrust, a decent pressure estimate could be obtained.

Oh, and I repeat my question. Do you consider this to be a white propellant?
http://www.pro38.com/images/NATS2.jpg
 

Chrisn

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Forbidden
You don't have permission to access /images/NATS2.jpg on this server.

Link us to the page it is on.
 

ben_ullman

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Very true (I'm a student in aerospace engineering, and I've already taken a class involving nozzle design - give me some credit here). As for total impulse (often incorrectly called total thrust), it is completely irrelevant. Actually, what would be useful would be the nozzle specs. From nozzle throat diameter and initial thrust, a decent pressure estimate could be obtained.

Oh, and I repeat my question. Do you consider this to be a white propellant?
http://www.pro38.com/images/NATS2.jpg
yeah yeah I know. You boasted about that at LDRS Mr engineer :neener:

I was looking at what was given to try and get an idea of what the differences are between the 2 with thrust and duration. Not 100% irrelevant with pressure (IMO)

Yes I do consider that white as it has a white flame? Am I missing a joke?

Ben
 

cjl

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Actually, it was more to prove a point. If you consider it white, it kind of proves your point about blues hitting harder than a white wrong (well, at least I have yet to see a blue that hits harder than Vmax, which is the propellant in that photo).

Oh, and for anyone having trouble with the above link, try this one:
http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c183/chris_lapanse/NATS2.jpg
 
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ben_ullman

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Actually, it was more to prove a point. If you consider it white, it kind of proves your point about blues hitting harder than a white wrong (well, at least I have yet to see a blue that hits harder than Vmax, which is the propellant in that photo).

Oh, and for anyone having trouble with the above link, try this one:
http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c183/chris_lapanse/NATS2.jpg
Ah a trickery photo! I should have known it. Not only because its from you ;) But because the flame pattern doesn't match most othe whites. I wasn't sure since CTI does have a kicking white.

Ben
 
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