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First major setback

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NewEntity1

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I had primed my Big Daddy this morning, and that part worked well. Its was raining heavily all day, so I waited until this evening to put on the actual paint. This is when the problem struck.

The paint was a special spray-can modeling paint I had picked up (at an elevated price) at the same time I bought the Big Daddy. I believe it was intended for RC Model airplanes. At any rate, because of the rain, I set down newspapers in the toolshed and prepared to paint the rocket there. I shook the can for 3 minutes, then began to spray from 6-8" away. This had worked fine for the primer.

However, the paint went on in thick glops, which foamed with bubbles. I quickly rubbed the rocket down with a cloth (making a mess), and then went off to get some paint thinner. I removed most of the paint with paint thinner...however, I now have one ugly looking rocket :/

What should I do? Should I buy new paint at the hardware store, and paint over it? Should I try removing the remaining paint before doing so? Will the paint thinner used weaken the glue fillets?
 

Zippy

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Eyeball the glue fillets and freshen them up if you think they need it. As far as the paint goes, let it cure then wet sand it with 400 or 600. I've had to do that myself becouse of high humidity (Florida!) affecting the paint. In the end it just makes for a slicker if more expensive and time consuming paint job.

Edit: Forgot to mention you might want to test the paint on something else before replacing the can to see if it really is the paint or the weather that caused the problem.

Zippy
 

jflis

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let it dry completely then take some 600 grit sand paper and wet-sand it till it's smooth (you don't have to remove all the paint). Then hit it with 1-2 coats of primer, sanding between coats.

good as new and ready to take paint
 

Steward

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Sorry 'bout your paint problem...I've had that happen as well...
Humidity may play an important role in this..but I've learned that paint can get old, and not do well...especially the higher priced stuff that may have been sitting on the shelf a long...long...time.
I agree with the above posts in that you don't need to remove it all...and in the long run may benefit you...Patience is the hardest part sometimes....Good luck...!!!
 

Steward

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I wanted to say that in my above post...don't know why I didn't
I've always had the best of luck with all the "KRYLON "products...
Now if only some company rep saw this and say...sent me a bunch of it...wouldn't hurt me none...LOL
 

Fishhead

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Lowe's Valspar paints have always worked well for me. The color choice isn't anything to shout about, but I've always found that I got in the most trouble trying to get fancy instead of keeping it simple. (It hasn't stopped me from trying, but it usually shows in the final product.)
 

NewEntity1

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Wow I got a lot of replies...thanks :)

I think I'll do like some have suggested, and sand it down, then apply a new coat of primer. Then I'll go to the hardware store to get some regular spray paint (Krylon, or else the hardware store's own brand). I needed to get a second color for the nose cone, anyway :D
 

Ryan S.

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get some good primer, like Kilz. It is really expensive and goes on thick but it does the job amazingly.

make sure your surface is clean too that could be a problem. I have never really had a problem with paints bubbling but often they "alligate" which means the pain does weird things then ends up looking like alligator skin which, in short, really really sucks. Make sure the temperature is right too
 

Hospital_Rocket

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Everyone posted the obvious, use commercial spray like Krylon as it is all but rocket scientest proof. ;)

However, I want to drill a bit deeper and ask, were you trying to use a metallic, metalflake, or candy paint? If so, and you want the finish they provide, it's back to the hobby store for another $5, 3oz can of paint.

Here is the fruit of my experience with those finish types:

1. Expect to lay down 10-15 extremely thin coats. It glops, runs, and is a foul beast if you do it any other way.

2. Remember that a bunch of those model finishes are laquers and that chemistry does not always work well with enamel undercoats.

3. If this is the case. a simple wet sand and Krylon may not work for reason #2. What does work is about three days of curing, sanding, and a healthy coat of Kilz.

Al
 

NewEntity1

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Been posting my pics in the other thread (The one where subject titled: Digital Camera up and running again). Yesterday I attached photos of the primer coat I laid down on Christmas, and the new paintjob I did yesterday (Friday), after buying new paint. The picture is, unfortunately, a little shadowy, due to the flash on the camera no longer being functional.

I'm soon to start a new thread with some of today's pics, which are from the SCRA NAR#430 launch at the Santa Fe Dam. It was very crowded there today! :eek: :eek: :cool:
 

Cajunman06

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One piece of advice from someone hwo has experienced his share of frustrations with "models paints" (spray cans only):

STAY AWAY FROM THEM!!!

In my opinion, they just over priced cr*p.
 

astronboy

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Did the topcoat only bubble? Or did it eat into the under/primer coat?

If it is eating the primer coat, then you may be attempting to apply laquer over enamel.... laquer will eat enamel paint. (I learned this the usual way... the hard way :rolleyes: )

One thing I like to do to 'beef up' the spray-ability of canned spray paint, is to fill a bucket with hot tap water, and place the paint can in the hot water for 2-3 minutes just before painting. (NEVER heat the water on the stove, or you may explode the paint can!!) This will increase the pressure in the spray can, and I find that I get a thinner, less globbier (is that a word?) paint job. This is almost a must with TESTOR spray paint.
 
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