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Finishing filler/resin

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marvSRG

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I'm already on a posting rant tonight, so I figured I oughta keep it up. This one's for all you master finishers. I'm just a prime-sand-mask-paint-clear coat kinda guy for finishing. I'm looking into getting some better finishes, and finding a good body filler or resin that I can coat the rocket with and sand before I prime and paint...especially for those really rough airframes that result from accidental glue globs or messy glassing jobs. I've tried a few things, but nothing came out great. Any reccomendations? I'm thinking about microballoons and "finishing resin" epoxy.

Thanx!
 

teflonrocketry1

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You mean like Elmer's Carpenter's Interior Wood Filler. Sands easily, water clean up and available in a few different colors. You can purchase it at W-mart in a tube for a few dollars. I use it directly without thinning to fill spirals, dents and dings. Here is a picture of a recent model I made using this filler. The body tube transition was smoothed and the grain in the balsa fins were filled with the this material.

Bruce S. Levison, NAR #69055
 
A

Austin

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Elmers does a good job as does my favorite...I like to use EverCoat Formula 27 All Purpose Filler. This is purchased at boating stores and comes in a can with a tube kicker.

You lay a puddle on a plate, squeeze a small line of hardener across the top of the puddle, mix with a stick and spread. Auto body spreaders work fine while old credit cards work great for small spots. You have a few minutes to work before it starts kicking and it really fills well, including pinholes left by glassing. You can use your finger for tight spots, then wipe it off and wash hands with soap.

The beauty of this filler is workability. This stuff dries hard and strong, like concrete, but sands like butter. 150 grit takes it down fast, then you can switch to finer grits for the perfect finish. The filler sands into a non-buildup powder, almost like flour. A quick snap of the sandpaper on your leg and it's clean, ready to continue...I really like it alot. The final finish feels like a piece of plastic...really cool!

Hope this helps,

Carl
 

marvSRG

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Thanx guys. I'll check that product out, Carl. It sounds like what I'm looking for!

Thanx!
 

astronboy

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I am not sure what sized rockets you are finishing, but if they are low-power, I use 3-4 coats of the Elmer's FNF, then anywhere from 4-8 coats of primer paint, sanded every few coats or so.

Although there are a number of great primer paints out there, I usually use primer made by the same company as my finish coats. This should theoretically prevent and incompatability between the primer and the finish coat. (if your chosen paint company makes both laquer and enamels, be sure to use one or the other for both primer and finish coats)

Me, I am a simple man. I use Walmart-El-Cheapo flat white paint as a primer, and often follow this up with Wal-mart finish coats.

I have found that Krylon and ACE hardware paints work over this Walmart flat white.

Once I get all of the spirals, etc filled and sanded with 320 grit, I give a final smooth over with 400 grit sandpaper. Then I clean off the rocket with a tack cloth, and paint with 3 light coats of my finish paint, each coat sprayed about 15 minutes apart.

I let this dry for a good week or so before applying a second color.

Finally, once the rocket is all painted and decaled, I use a finish coat of Future Floor polish for a glossy 'wet' look.

I am sure there are as many ways to finish a rocket as there are to skin a cat, but hey, this works for me.

:D
 

Fore Check

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Originally posted by CTulanko
Elmers does a good job as does my favorite...I like to use EverCoat Formula 27 All Purpose Filler. This is purchased at boating stores and comes in a can with a tube kicker.

You lay a puddle on a plate, squeeze a small line of hardener across the top of the puddle, mix with a stick and spread. Auto body spreaders work fine while old credit cards work great for small spots. You have a few minutes to work before it starts kicking and it really fills well, including pinholes left by glassing. You can use your finger for tight spots, then wipe it off and wash hands with soap.

The beauty of this filler is workability. This stuff dries hard and strong, like concrete, but sands like butter. 150 grit takes it down fast, then you can switch to finer grits for the perfect finish. The filler sands into a non-buildup powder, almost like flour. A quick snap of the sandpaper on your leg and it's clean, ready to continue...I really like it alot. The final finish feels like a piece of plastic...really cool!

Hope this helps,

Carl
Would this stuff work well on fins?
 

Fore Check

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Originally posted by astronboy
I am not sure what sized rockets you are finishing, but if they are low-power, I use 3-4 coats of the Elmer's FNF, then anywhere from 4-8 coats of primer paint, sanded every few coats or so.

Although there are a number of great primer paints out there, I usually use primer made by the same company as my finish coats. This should theoretically prevent and incompatability between the primer and the finish coat. (if your chosen paint company makes both laquer and enamels, be sure to use one or the other for both primer and finish coats)

Me, I am a simple man. I use Walmart-El-Cheapo flat white paint as a primer, and often follow this up with Wal-mart finish coats.

I have found that Krylon and ACE hardware paints work over this Walmart flat white.

Once I get all of the spirals, etc filled and sanded with 320 grit, I give a final smooth over with 400 grit sandpaper. Then I clean off the rocket with a tack cloth, and paint with 3 light coats of my finish paint, each coat sprayed about 15 minutes apart.

I let this dry for a good week or so before applying a second color.

Finally, once the rocket is all painted and decaled, I use a finish coat of Future Floor polish for a glossy 'wet' look.

I am sure there are as many ways to finish a rocket as there are to skin a cat, but hey, this works for me.

:D
I never wait so long. I went from a naked rocket to a primed and finished two-color rocket in a day. Decals went on the next morning, gloss cote the same evening as the decals.

Looks good to me! The finish seems quite durable and no irregularities.
 
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