filling spirals

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

Mx2

Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
27
At only 2.5 RPM my guess is that is not what you want...
Yes, faster speed but you did go a route I haven’t thought of and that is seeing what is all ready on market.

I was thinking about what you said regarding 3” and 4 inch and what one could do quickly, cheaply. No great flashes of inspiration on this end although I was thinking about it.

Currently I have about three Estes rocket kits I still need to build (small tube) and no immediate plans for larger tube. But all it would take is a device like you had found, possibly like a shoe buffer? Ahhhh, maybe? Laying in the back of a Thrift store for about $10 that could be easily converted over.... so I like your thinking what is out there that could turn 3 or 4 inch cardboard tube with minimal re-work and not creating a hazard to fingers and limbs.
Hmmmmm...
 

o1d_dude

'I battle gravity'
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
8,379
Reaction score
1,265
Location
A Banana Republic
Yes, faster speed but you did go a route I haven’t thought of and that is seeing what is all ready on market.

I was thinking about what you said regarding 3” and 4 inch and what one could do quickly, cheaply. No great flashes of inspiration on this end although I was thinking about it.

Currently I have about three Estes rocket kits I still need to build (small tube) and no immediate plans for larger tube. But all it would take is a device like you had found, possibly like a shoe buffer? Ahhhh, maybe? Laying in the back of a Thrift store for about $10 that could be easily converted over.... so I like your thinking what is out there that could turn 3 or 4 inch cardboard tube with minimal re-work and not creating a hazard to fingers and limbs.
Hmmmmm...
Great idea!

A shoe buffer would an excellent place to start.
 

jrap330

Retired Engineer, NAR # 76940
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 25, 2020
Messages
721
Reaction score
225
Location
NJ
Wondering if something like this could be used to spin tubes for filling:

Amazon. It’s called a cup turner.

I swear....sometimes I think the internet reads my posts and my mind...
It is design for cups and mugs....so 3-4 inch diameter????/Video..turns slow....so there goes you saving time by fast spin...sand etc
 

o1d_dude

'I battle gravity'
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
8,379
Reaction score
1,265
Location
A Banana Republic
It is design for cups and mugs....so 3-4 inch diameter????/Video..turns slow....so there goes you saving time by fast spin...sand etc
I’d imagine the motor could be replaced easily enough to address the slow speed issue but at this point I’m thinking about @Mx2 ‘s idea of using a shoe buffer...
 

jrap330

Retired Engineer, NAR # 76940
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 25, 2020
Messages
721
Reaction score
225
Location
NJ
Back to using drill..issue was beefing up a wooden dowel to hold air frame. If you installed the motor mount...then just glue an engine casing to a dowel and spin. .I do not think shoe buffer/shiner spin fast either..
 

BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
9,214
Reaction score
3,900
If you spin too fast won’t it fling the paint right off?
 

Mx2

Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
27
Possibly. Variable speed control, slow down rpm or quantity of paint.
 

Zbench

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 30, 2018
Messages
92
Reaction score
97
Location
Broadview Heights, OH
Mx2, I have to hand it to you on that Tamiya Basic Putty. I picked some up after looking at you using it on the video. I discovered that if you just get a little ball on your index finger you can move about 6" around a spiral before you have to reload. If you press and spread it thin it goes even farther.

I am working on an Aspire build and treated the upper half that way, doing both spirals, the deep one and the shallow one. It hardened up in about 20 minutes. I just used a pad of steel wool and worked it in my hand and then sprayed with my Seymour Filling primer. It worked fantastic. One coat and smoothed it out again with the 0000 steel wool and I am done.

That Tamiya putty is pretty tenacious and dries hard. I like that if flows smooth unlike bondo that gets clumpy really fast. It's a great solution. Thanks for the tip.
 

RocketTree

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2020
Messages
247
Reaction score
279
Location
Canada
I mask the spiral above and below with tape. Brush filler primer into the spiral 2-3 coats. Remove tape. Sand down and prime the whole rocket tube. Spirals gone!

If you use automotive filler, get "glazing putty". Bondo body filler is too "hard" to sand on a paper body tube.

All the best!
 

Mike Haberer

DaHabes
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 7, 2019
Messages
839
Reaction score
571
On my latest build I've used Bondo thinned with acetone. I make it as runny as possible and apply with a quality paint brush. The main problem with Bondo is the volatiles evaporate so quickly it is hard to spread evenly without clumping. Thinning helps. Once applied I go over any clumpy spots with the brush dipped in acetone, which helps spread the lumps out. I haven't gotten to priming yet, but the sanded airframe looks good.
 

neil_w

Brain and brain, what is brain!?!
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 14, 2015
Messages
12,363
Reaction score
5,310
Location
Northern NJ
But if I use my “scrap” tube I won’t have it for my next kit bash! :)
Nonsense; it just means that tube will be “ready to go” for your next build.

BTW dunno if I mentioned this before but I’ve started lightly sanding the whole tube with 400 grit before applying the CWF to help it adhere better (vs. the raw glassine).
 

brockrwood

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
528
Reaction score
316
Location
Denver, Colorado, USA
Nonsense; it just means that tube will be “ready to go” for your next build.

BTW dunno if I mentioned this before but I’ve started lightly sanding the whole tube with 400 grit before applying the CWF to help it adhere better (vs. the raw glassine).
The tube manufacturers should just omit the glassine finish.
 

Greg Furtman

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Nov 10, 2018
Messages
1,731
Reaction score
1,025
Location
Webster, Wisconsin
I found the sandpaper doesn't load as quickly if I sand sometimes in an orbital or circular motion.
Try some Mirka Abranet. Great stuff. Open mesh and when it fills up (which takes a lonnnggg time) just blow air through it from the backside and it is unloaded. :)
 

Back_at_it

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2019
Messages
781
Reaction score
671
I always do the filling after assembly. I don’t want any material getting between the glue bond on the fins.

Depending on the depth of the grooves I will either use DAP brand wood filler for the deeper stuff or simply use SEM high build automotive primer. For grooves in typical Estes kids, two coats of SEM primer will typically fill them completely without the need for wood filler.

SEM also sans very easily and doesn’t clog the paper. I also wet sand everything so this really has never been an issue regardless of the brand
 

kuririn

BARGeezer
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
7,011
Reaction score
5,229
Location
Hawaii
Lately I've been using this Aussie product I got from Amazon called Timber Mate. It's a water soluble wood filler with the consistency of putty. Just put a gob on your fingertip and run it along the spirals, going perpendicular to get it into the trough.
Just did a Squared Max tube, took maybe 5 minutes.
0804210436[1].jpg


0804210437[1].jpg


0804210436a[1].jpg


Also used it on the New Way Flat Boy with good results
1628088630912.png


Next: gonna try it on a foam Spaceship One. Tamiya white putty has a solvent that eats foam.
0804210454[1].jpg


Laters.
 

aviserated

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2021
Messages
82
Reaction score
28
Testors makes a putty that comes in a Gray tube. The tube is shaped much like their plastic cement tubes. Hobby lobby sells it. Smells alot like lacguer putty and should be more easy to apply than the red Bondo stuff.
 

DES

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 7, 2016
Messages
83
Reaction score
102
Location
Anchorage Alaska
The Bondo #907 solvent based glazing putty works really well. This is a solvent based putty very similar to the Testors or Tamiya, just a little bit thicker. Not the "Professional Glazing Putty" which is a two part polyester.

I have had really good luck with the "smear and wipe" technique. It is fast, and very little sanding required. Basically you smear a thin film of the solvent based glazing putty over the body tube, let it start to dry a bit so it gets thicker, then quickly wipe it all off with a paper towel, scrubbing across the spirals. It leaves the filler in the groves, but very little on the surface of the tube. The putty dries fast, so you have to do a section at a time and not get carried away. You can repeat the process a couple of times if the grooves are deep, or you can apply the putty directly to the groove, and use a plastic scraper to level it off. It goes really fast.

Then you sand and prime. Two coats of a fast dry lacquer base primer, with sanding between usually fills all the spirals. This will depend on your body tube and how deep the groove are. I don't like "spray fillers". They are soft and gummy, don't sand well, and don't really seem to fill spirals well.


DSCF1156.JPG


DSCF1162.JPG


DSCF1173.JPG


DSCF1174.JPG



DSCF1159.JPG
 

aviserated

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2021
Messages
82
Reaction score
28
Wouldn't it be best to spray on primer first then next apply the putty?
 

NateB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2012
Messages
2,095
Reaction score
2,193
Location
NE Indiana
Wouldn't it be best to spray on primer first then next apply the putty?
That's what I do. I prime and sand, which helps find the low spots. Use Bondo spot putty, sand, prime, sand and repeat until I'm happy.
 
Top